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Water Heater Expansion Tank Problems

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  • Peter Aitoro
    There have been a number of Virginia Trace residents that have had problems with the expansion tanks on their water heaters (at least 5 that I know of), so
    Message 1 of 3 , Aug 1, 2009
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      There have been a number of Virginia Trace residents that have had
      problems with the expansion tanks on their water heaters (at least 5
      that I know of), so this may be a common problem in The Villages. In
      most of these cases, the problem is manifested by leakage from the
      pressure relief valve. Some people are fortunate in that the pressure
      relief valve leakage goes into a catch basin beneath the water heater.
      In other cases, the leakage drips onto the pedestal or floor beneath the
      water heater. As a point of information, the problem may not be the
      pressure relief valve, but a failure of the expansion tank above the
      water heater. When the expansion tank fails, you may get leakage from
      the pressure relief valve. Before you go out and buy/install a new
      pressure relief valve, check to see if the expansion tank above the
      water heater is full. You can do this by tapping the tank to hear if it
      is full, or by depressing the valve (I was told it was similar to the
      air valve in an automobile tire) at the top of the expansion tank. If
      water comes out instead of air, then it is likely that the expansion
      tank has failed.

      I'm reporting this so that you do-it-yourselfers don't spend money
      needlessly on a pressure relief valve, when the problem may be the
      expansion tank. By the way, I was told* the expansion tank is not part
      of the warranty on your water heater*, since it was an add-on installed
      by your plumber. The expansion tank has its own warranty, but I can
      almost guarantee that if it fails it's past the expiration date of the
      warranty. I had Torri Plumbing install my new expansion tank at a cost
      of $105, but they also flushed out my water heater and did some other
      minor work. Do-it-yourselfers can save a few bucks if you can manage it
      yourself. Good luck!
    • Gwen Barshay
      I absolutely agree with what you had to say. We had water running out of our tank into the pan below the hot water heater and two service calls tried to
      Message 2 of 3 , Aug 1, 2009
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        I absolutely agree with what you had to say. We had water running out of
        our tank into the pan below the hot water heater and two service calls tried
        to repair/replace the pressure relief valve. Turns out a plumber who really
        knew what he was doing finally diagnosed it as the expansion tank. It was
        filled with water. Once that was replaced, we have had no leaks in over a
        year. We spent a lot of money on plumbers who didn't know what they were
        doing to find out what you wrote about. Thanks for hopefully saving lots of
        people monies they would have spent needlessly.

        Gwen Barshay



        Live Simply, Love Generously, Care Deeply, Speak Kindly, Pray Daily -- Leave
        the Rest to God.



        From: virginia_trace@yahoogroups.com [mailto:virginia_trace@yahoogroups.com]
        On Behalf Of Peter Aitoro
        Sent: Saturday, August 01, 2009 11:45 AM
        To: virginia_trace@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: VIRGINIA TRACE Water Heater Expansion Tank Problems





        There have been a number of Virginia Trace residents that have had
        problems with the expansion tanks on their water heaters (at least 5
        that I know of), so this may be a common problem in The Villages. In
        most of these cases, the problem is manifested by leakage from the
        pressure relief valve. Some people are fortunate in that the pressure
        relief valve leakage goes into a catch basin beneath the water heater.
        In other cases, the leakage drips onto the pedestal or floor beneath the
        water heater. As a point of information, the problem may not be the
        pressure relief valve, but a failure of the expansion tank above the
        water heater. When the expansion tank fails, you may get leakage from
        the pressure relief valve. Before you go out and buy/install a new
        pressure relief valve, check to see if the expansion tank above the
        water heater is full. You can do this by tapping the tank to hear if it
        is full, or by depressing the valve (I was told it was similar to the
        air valve in an automobile tire) at the top of the expansion tank. If
        water comes out instead of air, then it is likely that the expansion
        tank has failed.

        I'm reporting this so that you do-it-yourselfers don't spend money
        needlessly on a pressure relief valve, when the problem may be the
        expansion tank. By the way, I was told* the expansion tank is not part
        of the warranty on your water heater*, since it was an add-on installed
        by your plumber. The expansion tank has its own warranty, but I can
        almost guarantee that if it fails it's past the expiration date of the
        warranty. I had Torri Plumbing install my new expansion tank at a cost
        of $105, but they also flushed out my water heater and did some other
        minor work. Do-it-yourselfers can save a few bucks if you can manage it
        yourself. Good luck!





        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Rose Helle
        Thanks for the info - we will check ours out today.   Rose Helle ... From: Peter Aitoro Subject: VIRGINIA TRACE Water Heater Expansion
        Message 3 of 3 , Aug 2, 2009
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          Thanks for the info - we will check ours out today.
           
          Rose Helle

          --- On Sat, 8/1/09, Peter Aitoro <retepo@...> wrote:


          From: Peter Aitoro <retepo@...>
          Subject: VIRGINIA TRACE Water Heater Expansion Tank Problems
          To: virginia_trace@yahoogroups.com
          Date: Saturday, August 1, 2009, 11:44 AM


           



          There have been a number of Virginia Trace residents that have had
          problems with the expansion tanks on their water heaters (at least 5
          that I know of), so this may be a common problem in The Villages. In
          most of these cases, the problem is manifested by leakage from the
          pressure relief valve. Some people are fortunate in that the pressure
          relief valve leakage goes into a catch basin beneath the water heater.
          In other cases, the leakage drips onto the pedestal or floor beneath the
          water heater. As a point of information, the problem may not be the
          pressure relief valve, but a failure of the expansion tank above the
          water heater. When the expansion tank fails, you may get leakage from
          the pressure relief valve. Before you go out and buy/install a new
          pressure relief valve, check to see if the expansion tank above the
          water heater is full. You can do this by tapping the tank to hear if it
          is full, or by depressing the valve (I was told it was similar to the
          air valve in an automobile tire) at the top of the expansion tank. If
          water comes out instead of air, then it is likely that the expansion
          tank has failed.

          I'm reporting this so that you do-it-yourselfers don't spend money
          needlessly on a pressure relief valve, when the problem may be the
          expansion tank. By the way, I was told* the expansion tank is not part
          of the warranty on your water heater*, since it was an add-on installed
          by your plumber. The expansion tank has its own warranty, but I can
          almost guarantee that if it fails it's past the expiration date of the
          warranty. I had Torri Plumbing install my new expansion tank at a cost
          of $105, but they also flushed out my water heater and did some other
          minor work. Do-it-yourselfers can save a few bucks if you can manage it
          yourself. Good luck!



















          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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