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RE: [vintagejapansewingmachines] Re: introduction

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  • Gary Smyth
    Thanks Jeff, No cams came with this machine. I got the machine and cabinet at GoodWill for 1/2 price of $25.00 and bought it for the cabinet intending to
    Message 1 of 10 , Nov 11, 2009
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      Thanks Jeff,

      No cams came with this machine.

      I got the machine and cabinet at GoodWill for 1/2 price of $25.00 and bought it for the cabinet intending to re-donate the machine back to them. I got it home and threaded it up and it zigzags so beautifully and is such a quite machine I decided to add it to my herd of 18 machines.

      All it had was one extra bobbin.

      The serial number starts with the prefix 'FZ' 9031122 if that is any help at all.

      Thanks again,

      GArY

      To: vintagejapansewingmachines@yahoogroups.com
      From: jpmotis@...
      Date: Tue, 10 Nov 2009 20:43:08 +0000
      Subject: [vintagejapansewingmachines] Re: introduction




























      Did any of the decorator stitch cams come with the machine? It looks like it takes the type that remind me of an older radio knob. Some Dressmakers and the early Kenmores had these type versus the flatter Singer's and Elna's. Your probably looking at a window between 55 and 61. I hope someone can be more help. If you found any JA or JC numbers that didn't show up in the pictures, those could help too.



      Jeff


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • gwin1943
      Hello, Everyone -- I ve just joined and wanted to introduce myself. My name is Gwin, which was my maternal grandmother s maiden name. I am a quilter and have
      Message 2 of 10 , May 31, 2012
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        Hello, Everyone --

        I've just joined and wanted to introduce myself. My name is Gwin, which was my maternal grandmother's maiden name. I am a quilter and have collected vintage Singers for several years and have been active on some other Yahoo machine groups during that time. My interest in Japanese machines began recently when I stumbled across a Singer 226 in an antique mall in Clarkston, WA. I also have a mid-'70s New Home 554, which my husband purchased for me new way back then.

        The 226 has a robin's egg blue motor and male plug but I'm assuming (maybe incorrectly) that it did not leave the factory that way. Please correct me if you know differently or think that that is an incorrect assumption on my part. I see similarities in this machine to several different other vintage Singers and I'm assuming that it's considered a "class 15". Compared to my 30+ other vintage Singers, it seems like some sort of hybrid. Again, please correct me if I'm wrong. There is no owner's manual with the machine and I am hoping that someone here can help me find one to download or purchase. I would also appreciate input from anyone who has this machine or has information about it.

        I would also appreciate knowing if either the Singer 226 or the New Home 554 were made by Toyota.

        Thank you for your help.

        Gwin, a native Texan transplanted to the beautiful Pacific Northwest
      • rons_hobbies
        It s almost certain the factory color, there are some real sweet ones out there. Search the message archives for Manual and then also with the name of your
        Message 3 of 10 , Jun 3, 2012
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          It's almost certain the factory color, there are some real sweet ones out there. Search the message archives for "Manual" and then also with the name of your machine. You'll probably find a generic manual in the group files is what you need. Very few came with anything other then a generic manual. Morse's are an exception.

          I have never heard of either of those two being made by Toyota. On the machines that did have a Toyota affiliation there is often a clue such as a casting mark on the underside of the bed or a logo with a crown like Toyota used. And that's not 100% certain.

          Ron

          --- In vintagejapansewingmachines@yahoogroups.com, "gwin1943" <gwin1943@...> wrote:
          >
          > Hello, Everyone --
          >
          <Snip>
          >
          > The 226 has a robin's egg blue motor and male plug but I'm assuming (maybe incorrectly) that it did not leave the factory that way. Please correct me if you know differently or think that that is an incorrect assumption on my part. I see similarities in this machine to several different other vintage Singers and I'm assuming that it's considered a "class 15". Compared to my 30+ other vintage Singers, it seems like some sort of hybrid. Again, please correct me if I'm wrong. There is no owner's manual with the machine and I am hoping that someone here can help me find one to download or purchase. I would also appreciate input from anyone who has this machine or has information about it.
          >
          > I would also appreciate knowing if either the Singer 226 or the New Home 554 were made by Toyota.
          >
          > Thank you for your help.
          >
          > Gwin, a native Texan transplanted to the beautiful Pacific Northwest
          >
        • Kitty
          I don t know if you re aware that many japanese companies began to copy Singers that the pattens had expired on, right after the second world war. it was a way
          Message 4 of 10 , Jun 4, 2012
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            I don't know if you're aware that many japanese companies began to copy
            Singers that the pattens had expired on, right after the second world
            war. it was a way to get some cash flow into the country right away to
            aid in rebuilding. Straight stitch only Class 15's were widely copied
            even down to the dents sometimes, but were not considered singers at
            all, even though they look like them and are basically just as good a
            machine.

            In my own view, (and I'm no expert) it seems like they didn't begin to
            design and build their own machines til the 70's or early 80's. I'd
            assume your robin egg blue machine is a copy of a Singer but in no way
            affiliated.
          • rons_hobbies
            Changes to the basic 15 mechanism can be seen in early to mid 50s machines. One example is the dropping of the feed dogs. Ron
            Message 5 of 10 , Jun 5, 2012
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              Changes to the basic 15 mechanism can be seen in early to mid '50s machines. One example is the dropping of the feed dogs.

              Ron

              --- In vintagejapansewingmachines@yahoogroups.com, Kitty <basyfeltn@...> wrote:
              >
              > I don't know if you're aware that many japanese companies began to copy
              > Singers that the pattens had expired on, right after the second world
              > war. it was a way to get some cash flow into the country right away to
              > aid in rebuilding. Straight stitch only Class 15's were widely copied
              > even down to the dents sometimes, but were not considered singers at
              > all, even though they look like them and are basically just as good a
              > machine.
              >
              > In my own view, (and I'm no expert) it seems like they didn't begin to
              > design and build their own machines til the 70's or early 80's. I'd
              > assume your robin egg blue machine is a copy of a Singer but in no way
              > affiliated.
              >
            • gwin1943
              ... Well, my 226 has dropping feed dogs. Gwin in Spokane
              Message 6 of 10 , Jun 5, 2012
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                "rons_hobbies" <peter.pilot@...> wrote:
                >
                > Changes to the basic 15 mechanism can be seen in early to mid '50s machines. One example is the dropping of the feed dogs.

                Well, my 226 has dropping feed dogs.

                Gwin in Spokane
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