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Re: Introduction

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  • klmandco2001
    This is my third attempt to respond to this message. Maybe the third time will be a charm. This time I will not try to preview it. Your advice about choosing
    Message 1 of 20 , Apr 23, 2009
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      This is my third attempt to respond to this message. Maybe the third time will be a charm. This time I will not try to preview it.

      Your advice about choosing the ones I don't love to sew with or look at is good. I have been trying to do that, as I audition them for piecing, heavier duty sewing, free motion quilting, regular quilting, and thread painting. The trouble is, I can rationalize keeping most of them.

      Actually, I have given lots away and now mostly have machines that I really like or machines that I can't fix myself and can't afford to have repaired all at once. I may offer them to the repairman as parts machines or ones that he could fix and sell or donate. I got a little carried away with my purchasing and my optimisim about my ability to repair them.

      Today I have been making dog/cat beds for the shelter using my Kenmore 1040 and am trying to figure out why my "Star" 15 clone doesn't want to stitch. I think it would be great for free motion or thread painting. It's also a pretty machine. It reminds me of a thoroughbred racehorse--sleek and strong.

      Karlyn from Missouri
    • scotprin
      Hi. I m rather new to vintage sewing machine collecting and can t seem to pass up a good one. I have a Singer Spartan in mint condition. A New Home (Janome)
      Message 2 of 20 , Nov 21, 2009
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        Hi. I'm rather new to vintage sewing machine collecting and can't seem to pass up a good one. I have a Singer Spartan in mint condition. A New Home (Janome) 534, zig zag, cammed machine (but no cams). A Nechhi BU; three Supernovas, a Brother model 80 straight stitch and a like new badged "White" 15 clone. All sew beautifuly and my wife has even gotten into sewing again (she's done pillows with the Spartan and at present is recovering couch cushions with the New Home) it's in a very nice walnut cabinet that she had me put in the family room.

        My problem: The axle on the White clone was frozen in its arm and even though I got it to loosen some, the arm snapped off. Needless to say, I'm looking for that arm including the bobbin axle and wheel. If anyone is parting a "15" clone and has this assembly for sale, I'd be very interested. The machine is too nice not to be perfect!

        Thanks,

        Scott/Michigan
      • merainia
        My name is Melainia and I recently got an Electra Royal XL 5000 sewing machine for $10 at a thrift shop. The plate on the back says it s made in Japan. I have
        Message 3 of 20 , Mar 27, 2012
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          My name is Melainia and I recently got an Electra Royal XL 5000 sewing machine for $10 at a thrift shop. The plate on the back says it's made in Japan. I have finally found a manual for it online, which was mislabeled as a Brother manual (unless Brother made these machines but didn't label them as Brother). I did a search for any mention of the Electra brand on this forum and only came up with one conversation about a Necchi machine, and so I wanted to put my machine out here for future searches, or if anyone can tell me anything about it that isn't in the manual. I will post some pictures as well, since it seems not many people are putting any info on the web about them. I have no idea about when this machine was made, but I do know it's a low shank machine mostly made of metal with a verticle bobbin, and the screw and foot shank from my older singer (but not that old, 3270C) fits on it. The manual shows an extension plate, which I would love to have, but have no idea if I could find one.

          Thanks for letting me join, I'm new to vintage sewing machines. Perhaps it will become a hobby for me as well.

          Melainia
        • Cari
          Meliania, Your machine could very well be made by Brother. Brother made and badged several brands of machines. I can t tell you anything specific other than if
          Message 4 of 20 , Mar 28, 2012
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            Meliania,
            Your machine could very well be made by Brother. Brother made and badged several brands of machines. I can't tell you anything specific other than if it's a Brother, it should be a good machine. I'm quite fond of them and have several. As for the bed extension, if you find one it will be pure luck. Most times, once they are separated from the machine they are never to be seen again. You would have more luck finding one of those old free arm sewing tables where the left half of the table flips up to meet the machine. I see them in thrift stores and on CL quite often. I picked up mine at a Goodwill store and all my vintage free arm machines fit well enough.

            Cari

            --- In vintagejapansewingmachines@yahoogroups.com, "merainia" <mel@...> wrote:
            >
            > My name is Melainia and I recently got an Electra Royal XL 5000 sewing machine for $10 at a thrift shop. The plate on the back says it's made in Japan. I have finally found a manual for it online, which was mislabeled as a Brother manual (unless Brother made these machines but didn't label them as Brother). I did a search for any mention of the Electra brand on this forum and only came up with one conversation about a Necchi machine, and so I wanted to put my machine out here for future searches, or if anyone can tell me anything about it that isn't in the manual. I will post some pictures as well, since it seems not many people are putting any info on the web about them. I have no idea about when this machine was made, but I do know it's a low shank machine mostly made of metal with a verticle bobbin, and the screw and foot shank from my older singer (but not that old, 3270C) fits on it. The manual shows an extension plate, which I would love to have, but have no idea if I could find one.
            >
            > Thanks for letting me join, I'm new to vintage sewing machines. Perhaps it will become a hobby for me as well.
            >
            > Melainia
            >
          • rons_hobbies
            Welcome. Do a message search on Clone and you will get answers to most if not all of your questions. It can be a fun hobby, especially if you live someplace
            Message 5 of 20 , Mar 29, 2012
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              Welcome. Do a message search on "Clone" and you will get answers to most if not all of your questions. It can be a fun hobby, especially if you live someplace where prices are not insane just because the machine is "Old."

              Ron

              --- In vintagejapansewingmachines@yahoogroups.com, "merainia" <mel@...> wrote:
              >
              > My name is Melainia and I recently got an Electra Royal XL 5000 sewing machine for $10 at a thrift shop. The plate on the back says it's made in Japan. I have finally found a manual for it online, which was mislabeled as a Brother manual (unless Brother made these machines but didn't label them as Brother).
              <Snip>
              The manual shows an extension plate, which I would love to have, but have no idea if I could find one.
              >
              > Thanks for letting me join, I'm new to vintage sewing machines. Perhaps it will become a hobby for me as well.
              >
              > Melainia
              >
            • fruitfarmergirl
              Hello everyone..... I sew for a living- started with dolls clothes when i was 12- and i use only vintage machines. I bought my first machine, a Kenmore
              Message 6 of 20 , May 4, 2012
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                Hello everyone.....

                I sew for a living- started with dolls clothes when i was 12- and i use only vintage machines.
                I bought my first machine, a Kenmore 158-16520, which was my primary machine until 3 years ago.
                Since then, i have become the proud owner of a fair number of vintage Singers and a few more Kennies.

                Always open to adopting more, i hope to gain info and share some of my experiences, here with all of you nice folks.

                Mariah
              • Tanit-Isis
                Hi! I was recently given a teal-coloured Piedmont badged machine (photos in the gallery). It s beautiful, although the motor needs rewiring, and once I got it
                Message 7 of 20 , Nov 15, 2012
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                  Hi! I was recently given a teal-coloured Piedmont badged machine (photos in the gallery). It's beautiful, although the motor needs rewiring, and once I got it oiled up it stitched really well (as far as I can tell from handwheeling). I'm so glad I found this group, because it's been very helpful for figuring out things like where the machine was sold (the Hudson's Bay Company, a major Canadian department store) and the generic model 15 manual in the files section is perfect.

                  The serial # is C788793. Aside from the "Piedmont" lettering, a small logo on the base of the harp arm says "JSM." I was wondering if this might denote the manufacturer, or if it's just some further layer of badging. Janome came to mind, but I've never seen a Janome in this old style, and most of the posts I've read say that Janome machines have a serial # starting with J or JA.

                  Thanks for all the help I've already gotten from the messages, files, and photos. :)

                  Tanit
                • Susan
                  Hello, My name is Susan. I joined awhile back and have been reading and learning. I became interested in fixing vintage sewing machines fairly recently, but I
                  Message 8 of 20 , Dec 29, 2012
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                    Hello,
                    My name is Susan. I joined awhile back and have been reading and learning.
                    I became interested in fixing vintage sewing machines fairly recently, but I absolutely love it!
                    It started when a plastic part disintegrated inside my Pfaff tiptronic 1171. I bought the machine new 25 to 30 years ago. I figure other parts will begin to go too, so do not intend to repair it.
                     My daughter had picked up a machine from Goodwill for $11, then became frustrated when she could not make it work, as she has little experience and no manual. She planned to trash it. I did not feel right, with no sewing machine to use, so I got that machine out. It is a very heavy, all metal, Japanese made Emdeko. I found a manual for it on line, threaded it correctly,
                    and it sews wonderfully. I even found a set of the cams for it on ebay, though only because I knew what to look for, having seen a demonstration video of this machine that showed the cams.
                    That was the beginning. I am now cleaning, repairing and adjusting a made in Japan Ward's Signature UHT J277D to give my daughter. It came from a Goodwill auction for $17 with the manual and all the accessories, no case though.

                    Also from the same auction, I have a made in Japan Nelco R-375-2 in a cabinet standing by. Interesting machine, left needle position.

                    I have since added a Necchi BCJ in it's cabinet and an older Viking Husqvarna.
                    The Japanese made machines are my favorites, so far. If I am not careful my house will be full of sewing machines!
                    No pictures yet, but will post some later.
                    Thank you all so much for sharing your knowledge and information.
                    Susan
                  • Susan
                    Hi Susan, I m another Susan recently bitten by the vintage sewing machine bug. I quilt as a hobby, have a computerized machine, but saw a Pink Atlas a few
                    Message 9 of 20 , Jan 2, 2013
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                      Hi Susan, I'm another Susan recently bitten by the vintage sewing machine bug. I quilt as a hobby, have a computerized machine, but saw a Pink Atlas a few months ago & fell in love with the look of it. It was pretty dirty & needed some tinkering to get it running.
                      I've been sewing for yrs & knew enough to keep my "modern" machines going, other than that, I'm not normally mechanically inclined. Working on that old Atlas turned out to be so much fun, I was kind of sad when it was working & all bright & shiny again.

                      I've decided, I don't want to buy any pretty, clean ones - finding one that needs lots of TLC is where the real fun & challenge is. I haven't been as lucky as you finding any so cheap (but I've been looking everywhere). Recently picked up 2 1948 Singers, 1 in a bentwood case that I fixed, the other is in a cabinet. I can sneak fabric into the house much easier than sewing machines. I've read & watched lots of videos on restoring these machines & just went out & bought what everyone suggested to use, to get them going again.

                      No idea what I'm going to do with all these machines (my family thinks I'm crazy), but fixing them has turned out to be almost as fun as sewing on them. Looking forward to seeing pictures of your machines. Glad I'm not the only one who enjoys this. Susan...



                      -
                    • Rachel
                      Hi Susan, I am new here and what a great forum. I fixed a machine with tension assembly issues by finding the answer here - a set screw was loose! I too quilt
                      Message 10 of 20 , Jan 2, 2013
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                        Hi Susan,

                        I am new here and what a great forum. I fixed a machine with tension assembly issues by finding the answer here - a set screw was loose!

                        I too quilt and have fallen in love with the old machines. I use daily a Morse 4400 Fotomatic for most of my peicing. It is the quietest machine I have and I can sew in the middle of the night and not bother my husband. LOL I love working on the old machines and making them sparkle again and have quite a few old Singers -301, 401, 404A, 15-95 in a great art deco cabinet and a few more I am sure I have missed. My favorite straight stitch is my old Kenmore Deluxe Rotary but I call it my growler. It has a case like an old suitcase and I have taken it to a few classes. The looks and laughs when I set it up are always fun but I never have bobbin or tension problems and the straight stitch is beautiful. Seems so many people with the new machines are always fiddling with something or having issues with birds nest or tension problems. Never any issues with my old Kenmore other than I get a work out hauling it around.

                        My husband was always asking why I need another machine but has gotten used to me bringing them home from garage sales and thrift stores and figures if 10.00 here or 20.00 there makes me happy, he can live with it as long as I use the Morse at night. His only request! He likes the Morse as much as I do.

                        Sure glad I found this group!

                        Happy New Year Everyone.

                        Rachel


                        --- In vintagejapansewingmachines@yahoogroups.com, "Susan" <sewnsuzie@...> wrote:
                        >
                        > Hi Susan, I'm another Susan recently bitten by the vintage sewing machine bug. I quilt as a hobby, have a computerized machine, but saw a Pink Atlas a few months ago & fell in love with the look of it. It was pretty dirty & needed some tinkering to get it running.
                        > I've been sewing for yrs & knew enough to keep my "modern" machines going, other than that, I'm not normally mechanically inclined. Working on that old Atlas turned out to be so much fun, I was kind of sad when it was working & all bright & shiny again.
                      • mdougherty22000
                        I joined the list last year when it became apparent that I would be inheriting a Morse Super-Dial. It has been in a closet for about 25 years. I would like to
                        Message 11 of 20 , Jan 18, 2013
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                          I joined the list last year when it became apparent that I would be inheriting a Morse Super-Dial. It has been in a closet for about 25 years. I would like to have it looked over and tuned up. I live just outside of Boston. Would any of you here live in the Boston area and have someone you trust or be someone who works on these machines?

                          I'd be very grateful for the advice.

                          Thank you,

                          Michele Dougherty
                        • mdougherty22000
                          Hi,I thought thaat I sent a post a few days ago. I understand that my message must be approved but maybe I did not send it properly the first time. I have just
                          Message 12 of 20 , Jan 23, 2013
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                            Hi,I thought thaat I sent a post a few days ago. I understand that my message must be approved but maybe I did not send it properly the first time.

                            I have just inherited a Morse Super-Dial. It has been in my mother's closet for 25 years. Apparently it was one of my grandmother's machines. I did not know about it until my mom became ill. She has now passed and I have it here at my home near Boston, MA.

                            It runs. I just ran it briefly as I did not want to cause damage from lack of oiling or perhaps the belt or wires being brittle.

                            It has a nice sound to it. I have another vintage machine of a kind not discussed here. I was fortunate to buy it from a skilled repair person some distance from me. It had been completely rewired and overhauled.

                            I would like to to the same with my new acquisition and am hoping that one of you here knows of someone wiht the skills to take care of it somewhere in my general area. I am north of Boston.

                            I would appreciate any recommendations or advice you may have to offer. I am enjoying all of the information in your files.

                            Thank you for your advice,

                            Michele
                          • nim macfadyen
                            You could try taking her apart and cleaning and oiling yourself. That s what most of us have found satisfying. Or you could take it to Spirito in Prov. RI.
                            Message 13 of 20 , Jan 26, 2013
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                              You could try taking her apart and cleaning and oiling yourself. That's
                              what most of us have found satisfying. Or you could take it to Spirito in
                              Prov. RI. They are among the best old machine techs anywhere.

                              On Wed, Jan 23, 2013 at 2:46 PM, mdougherty22000 <M2Dougherty@...>wrote:

                              > **
                              >
                              >
                              > Hi,I thought thaat I sent a post a few days ago. I understand that my
                              > message must be approved but maybe I did not send it properly the first
                              > time.
                              >
                              > I have just inherited a Morse Super-Dial. It has been in my mother's
                              > closet for 25 years. Apparently it was one of my grandmother's machines. I
                              > did not know about it until my mom became ill. She has now passed and I
                              > have it here at my home near Boston, MA.
                              >
                              > It runs. I just ran it briefly as I did not want to cause damage from lack
                              > of oiling or perhaps the belt or wires being brittle.
                              >
                              > It has a nice sound to it. I have another vintage machine of a kind not
                              > discussed here. I was fortunate to buy it from a skilled repair person some
                              > distance from me. It had been completely rewired and overhauled.
                              >
                              > I would like to to the same with my new acquisition and am hoping that one
                              > of you here knows of someone wiht the skills to take care of it somewhere
                              > in my general area. I am north of Boston.
                              >
                              > I would appreciate any recommendations or advice you may have to offer. I
                              > am enjoying all of the information in your files.
                              >
                              > Thank you for your advice,
                              >
                              > Michele
                              >
                              >
                              >


                              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                            • sammie simpson
                              Today at 10:10 AM I own several vintage Japanese machines and would like to join this group. I m trying to find out info on my Seam Master Model 2416, Serial
                              Message 14 of 20 , Feb 13, 2014
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                                Today at 10:10 AM
                                I own several vintage Japanese machines and would like to join this group. I'm trying to find out info on my Seam Master Model 2416, Serial # 1755 and JA 39 stamped on the bottom. It may be made by Koyo from Osaka, Japan but I'm not sure. I'd like to know what year it was made also. It has a place for cams on the top and I would like to know how to find some. I did a search and came up with nothing so I'm hoping your files will help.

                                Sammie quilter from NC
                              • sammie simpson
                                I own several vintage Japanese machines and would like to join this group. I m trying to find out info on my Seam Master Model 2416, Serial # 1755 and JA 39
                                Message 15 of 20 , Feb 17, 2014
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                                  I own several vintage Japanese machines and would like to join this group. I'm trying to find out info on my Seam Master Model 2416, Serial # 1755 and JA 39 stamped on the bottom. It may be made by Koyo from Osaka, Japan but I'm not sure. I'd like to know what year it was made also. It has a place for cams on the top and I would like to know how to find some. I did a search and came up with nothing so I was hoping your files would help but I did not find anything on this machine.

                                  Sammie quilter from NC


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