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  • Yakov Lerner
    [eval.txt] option                                          *expr-option* *E112* *E113* Suggest to add & character to tags here. If I
    Message 1 of 12 , Mar 19, 2009
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      [eval.txt]
      option                                          *expr-option* *E112* *E113*

      Suggest to add '&' character to tags here. If I want to jump to
      help topic about 'let &option=...', and I look at all tags containing
      &, it's not there. Example:

      option     *expr-option* *&option* *&g:option* *&l:option: *E112* *E113*

      (2) Suggest to add "See also |expr-options|" to :help setl and
      :help :setg.

      Suggest to add example with "let &..." to examples under *expr-option*.

      Yakov

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    • Yakov Lerner
      If vimscript functions had remark Added in vim7.1.129 , it would be useful. For example, if you want to know how portable the script is.
      Message 2 of 12 , Apr 4, 2009
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        If vimscript functions had remark "Added in vim7.1.129", it would be useful.
        For example, if you want to know how portable the script is.



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      • Matt Wozniski
        ... Probably not exactly what you re looking for, but I keep copies of vim 6.4.10 and 7.0.0 around just so that I can look at older runtimefiles and docs and
        Message 3 of 12 , Apr 4, 2009
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          On Sat, Apr 4, 2009 at 3:17 PM, Yakov Lerner wrote:
          >
          > If vimscript functions had remark "Added in vim7.1.129", it would be useful.
          > For example, if you want to know how portable the script is.

          Probably not exactly what you're looking for, but I keep copies of vim
          6.4.10 and 7.0.0 around just so that I can look at older runtimefiles
          and docs and test scripts in older vims.

          ~Matt

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        • Ingo Karkat
          ... I keep old Vim versions (since 6.0), too, and grep the docs for the first occurrence of a built-in function name. (But I also use these old Vims for
          Message 4 of 12 , Apr 4, 2009
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            On 04-Apr-09 22:21, Matt Wozniski wrote:
            > On Sat, Apr 4, 2009 at 3:17 PM, Yakov Lerner wrote:
            >> If vimscript functions had remark "Added in vim7.1.129", it would be useful.
            >> For example, if you want to know how portable the script is.
            >
            > Probably not exactly what you're looking for, but I keep copies of vim
            > 6.4.10 and 7.0.0 around just so that I can look at older runtimefiles
            > and docs and test scripts in older vims.
            >
            > ~Matt

            I keep old Vim versions (since 6.0), too, and grep the docs for the first
            occurrence of a built-in function name. (But I also use these old Vims for
            compatibility testing of my scripts.) I totally agree with Yakov that this would
            be very helpful for script writers. I'd love to see these remarks below each
            function's help text, with a formatting similar to those {not in Vi} and {not
            available when compiled without the +whatever feature} remarks, e.g. {since 7.0}
            or {optional third argument added with 7.1.42}.

            Manually researching this for all built-in functions looks tedious, but maybe
            someone can come up with a throwaway script that extracts the relevant info from
            the patch info / CVS history / git / ...?

            -- regards, ingo


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          • Tony Mechelynck
            ... The docs are there, it just may be a little esoteric to find them. ... or maybe, to narrow down the search, ... will search, in the former case the text of
            Message 5 of 12 , Apr 4, 2009
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              On 04/04/09 21:17, Yakov Lerner wrote:
              > If vimscript functions had remark "Added in vim7.1.129", it would be useful.
              > For example, if you want to know how portable the script is.

              The docs are there, it just may be a little esoteric to find them.

              :helpgrep \<foobar(

              or maybe, to narrow down the search,

              :vimgrep /\<foobar(/g $VIMRUNTIME/doc/version*.txt

              will search, in the former case the text of all help files, or in the
              latter case only that of the version*.txt helpfiles, for any mentioon of
              the foobar() function. If it was added to Vim not earlier than version
              4.0, you'll find at exactly at which version and patchlevel that happened.

              If you find out that it was introduced at version 6.3.87 you can test
              for it by either

              if exists('*foobar')

              or

              if version > 603 || (version == 603 && has('patch087'))

              The latter is useful if, at some point after introducing the function,
              an important bug in it (that you care about) was fixed.

              If some version of Vim 3 already had the function (i.e. it was already
              there as other than a "new feature" in Vim 4.0.000), then I suppose you
              can say by now that it's been there "forever", and the only case when
              you might still be unable to use it is if you use a non-feature-complete
              Vim lacking some optional feature which includes that function. Of
              course, -eval versions include no functions at all.


              Best regards,
              Tony.
              --
              The only really decent thing to do behind a person's back is pat it.

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            • George V. Reilly
              On Sat, Apr 4, 2009 at 5:31 PM, Tony Mechelynck ... VimL scripting was introduced in Vim 5.0, eleven years ago, according to
              Message 6 of 12 , Apr 4, 2009
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                On Sat, Apr 4, 2009 at 5:31 PM, Tony Mechelynck
                <antoine.mechelynck@...> wrote:

                > If some version of Vim 3 already had the function (i.e. it was already
                > there as other than a "new feature" in Vim 4.0.000), then I suppose you
                > can say by now that it's been there "forever", and the only case when
                > you might still be unable to use it is if you use a non-feature-complete
                > Vim lacking some optional feature which includes that function. Of
                > course, -eval versions include no functions at all.

                VimL scripting was introduced in Vim 5.0, eleven years ago, according
                to http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vim_(text_editor)#History. Personally,
                I wouldn't expend more than a few minutes ensuring compatibility with
                Vim 6.0 (2001), especially if you need dictionaries and other 7.0
                features.

                I think it's a mistake to continue supporting users who run really old
                versions of Vim or really old operating systems. Their numbers are
                dwindling and supporting them has real costs in terms of testing and
                code complexity. Look at the horrendous amounts of conditional code in
                the C source. If they don't want to upgrade (or can't), they'll have
                to accept limitations. They certainly have to from other programs.
                --
                /George V. Reilly george@...
                http://www.georgevreilly.com/blog http://blogs.cozi.com/tech

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              • Tony Mechelynck
                ... Didn t legacy Vi have exrc files? And how were they written if it wasn t in what could be recognizably seen as what evolved to become vimscript? ... Yeah,
                Message 7 of 12 , Apr 5, 2009
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                  On 05/04/09 04:33, George V. Reilly wrote:
                  >
                  > On Sat, Apr 4, 2009 at 5:31 PM, Tony Mechelynck
                  > <antoine.mechelynck@...> wrote:
                  >
                  >> If some version of Vim 3 already had the function (i.e. it was already
                  >> there as other than a "new feature" in Vim 4.0.000), then I suppose you
                  >> can say by now that it's been there "forever", and the only case when
                  >> you might still be unable to use it is if you use a non-feature-complete
                  >> Vim lacking some optional feature which includes that function. Of
                  >> course, -eval versions include no functions at all.
                  >
                  > VimL scripting was introduced in Vim 5.0, eleven years ago, according
                  > to http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vim_(text_editor)#History. Personally,
                  > I wouldn't expend more than a few minutes ensuring compatibility with
                  > Vim 6.0 (2001), especially if you need dictionaries and other 7.0
                  > features.

                  Didn't legacy Vi have exrc files? And how were they written if it wasn't
                  in what could be recognizably seen as what evolved to become vimscript?

                  >
                  > I think it's a mistake to continue supporting users who run really old
                  > versions of Vim or really old operating systems. Their numbers are
                  > dwindling and supporting them has real costs in terms of testing and
                  > code complexity. Look at the horrendous amounts of conditional code in
                  > the C source. If they don't want to upgrade (or can't), they'll have
                  > to accept limitations. They certainly have to from other programs.

                  Yeah, I rather think so too, but maybe with a different emphasis. I
                  think in terms of my present Vim 7.2 "with the latest patches", but I
                  write my vimrc etc. with appropriate "if has(...)" and "if exists(...)"
                  so they'll work on most Vim versions with as few errors as I can manage
                  (as they say, "be liberal in what you accept, conservative in what you
                  emit"). My whole vimrc includes if statements practically everywhere
                  (even ":if 1" in places) to avoid errors with the tiny minimum-features
                  version which I compile as a sanity check besides my day-to-day
                  workhorse Huge-with-GUI (whose binary is more than six times larger
                  after stripping).

                  When someone complains of a problem and mentions some "obsolete" Vim
                  version, I give as good an answer as I can think of, but I never fail to
                  mention the current version and patchlevel, with a sentence along the
                  lines of "I recommend that you upgrade: it will not necessarily cure
                  this problem, but it may cure other problems that you are or aren't
                  aware of".


                  Best regards,
                  Tony.
                  --
                  ARTHUR: Now stand aside worthy adversary.
                  BLACK KNIGHT: (Glancing at his shoulder) 'Tis but a scratch.
                  ARTHUR: A scratch? Your arm's off.
                  "Monty Python and the Holy Grail" PYTHON (MONTY)
                  PICTURES LTD

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                • Bram Moolenaar
                  ... This gets really messy, especially if you also want to mention extensions and changes done in a later version. And worse when including bug fixes. You can
                  Message 8 of 12 , Apr 5, 2009
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                    Yakov Lerner wrote:

                    > If vimscript functions had remark "Added in vim7.1.129", it would be
                    > useful. For example, if you want to know how portable the script is.

                    This gets really messy, especially if you also want to mention
                    extensions and changes done in a later version. And worse when
                    including bug fixes.

                    You can find the information in the version*.txt help files.
                    E.g. with ":help version7" you can see that all the List and Dictionary
                    stuff has been added in Vim 7.0. So instead of adding a remark "since
                    Vim 7.0" to every command, function, variable, etc. that uses a List
                    there is only this remark. It's a bit more work to figure out when
                    something got added, but it avoids a lot of mess scattered in the help
                    files. Some people may already find the {not in Vi} comments annoying.

                    --
                    TALL KNIGHT OF NI: Ni!
                    "Monty Python and the Holy Grail" PYTHON (MONTY) PICTURES LTD

                    /// Bram Moolenaar -- Bram@... -- http://www.Moolenaar.net \\\
                    /// sponsor Vim, vote for features -- http://www.Vim.org/sponsor/ \\\
                    \\\ download, build and distribute -- http://www.A-A-P.org ///
                    \\\ help me help AIDS victims -- http://ICCF-Holland.org ///

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                  • Tony Mechelynck
                    ... Well, OT1H they are somewhat annoying, but OTOH they are a warning that there might (not necessarily, but possibly) be a behaviour difference depending on
                    Message 9 of 12 , Apr 5, 2009
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                      On 05/04/09 17:54, Bram Moolenaar wrote:
                      > [...] Some people may already find the {not in Vi} comments annoying.

                      Well, OT1H they are somewhat annoying, but OTOH they are a warning that
                      there might (not necessarily, but possibly) be a behaviour difference
                      depending on the 'compatible' status; and seeing how many newbies are
                      still constantly bitten by the 'compatible' worm ('t ain't a bug, haha
                      ;-) ), I'd say that on the whole those comments are useful, even for
                      people who never use "legacy" Vi.


                      Best regards,
                      Tony.
                      --
                      Absinthe makes the tart grow fonder.

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                    • Spencer Collyer
                      ... IIRC, Vi s exrc files were just lists of Ex commands. --~--~---------~--~----~------------~-------~--~----~ You received this message from the vim_dev
                      Message 10 of 12 , Apr 5, 2009
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                        On Sun, 05 Apr 2009 11:38:18 +0200, Tony Mechelynck wrote:
                        >
                        > On 05/04/09 04:33, George V. Reilly wrote:
                        > >
                        > > On Sat, Apr 4, 2009 at 5:31 PM, Tony Mechelynck
                        > > <antoine.mechelynck@...> wrote:
                        > >

                        > > VimL scripting was introduced in Vim 5.0, eleven years ago,
                        > > according to
                        > > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vim_(text_editor)#History. Personally,
                        > > I wouldn't expend more than a few minutes ensuring compatibility
                        > > with Vim 6.0 (2001), especially if you need dictionaries and other
                        > > 7.0 features.
                        >
                        > Didn't legacy Vi have exrc files? And how were they written if it
                        > wasn't in what could be recognizably seen as what evolved to become
                        > vimscript?
                        >

                        IIRC, Vi's exrc files were just lists of Ex commands.

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                      • George V. Reilly
                        On Sun, Apr 5, 2009 at 11:12 PM, Spencer Collyer ... Pretty much just :map and :set. Look at the code in $VIMRUNTIME/macros and shudder. -- /George V. Reilly
                        Message 11 of 12 , Apr 6, 2009
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                          On Sun, Apr 5, 2009 at 11:12 PM, Spencer Collyer
                          <spencer@...> wrote:
                          >
                          > On Sun, 05 Apr 2009 11:38:18 +0200, Tony Mechelynck wrote:
                          >>
                          >> On 05/04/09 04:33, George V. Reilly wrote:
                          >> >
                          >> > On Sat, Apr 4, 2009 at 5:31 PM, Tony Mechelynck
                          >> > <antoine.mechelynck@...> wrote:
                          >> >
                          >
                          >> > VimL scripting was introduced in Vim 5.0, eleven years ago,
                          >> > according to
                          >> > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vim_(text_editor)#History. Personally,
                          >> > I wouldn't expend more than a few minutes ensuring compatibility
                          >> > with Vim 6.0 (2001), especially if you need dictionaries and other
                          >> > 7.0 features.
                          >>
                          >> Didn't legacy Vi have exrc files? And how were they written if it
                          >> wasn't in what could be recognizably seen as what evolved to become
                          >> vimscript?
                          >>
                          >
                          > IIRC, Vi's exrc files were just lists of Ex commands.

                          Pretty much just :map and :set. Look at the code in $VIMRUNTIME/macros
                          and shudder.
                          --
                          /George V. Reilly george@...
                          http://www.georgevreilly.com/blog http://blogs.cozi.com/tech

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                        • Tony Mechelynck
                          ... [...] ... art, except of course that it rightly belongs in $VIMRUNTIME/plugin. Best regards, Tony. -- This fortune intentionally not included.
                          Message 12 of 12 , Apr 6, 2009
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                            On 06/04/09 09:09, George V. Reilly wrote:
                            > On Sun, Apr 5, 2009 at 11:12 PM, Spencer Collyer
                            > <spencer@...> wrote:
                            [...]
                            >> IIRC, Vi's exrc files were just lists of Ex commands.
                            >
                            > Pretty much just :map and :set. Look at the code in $VIMRUNTIME/macros
                            > and shudder.

                            :-) Depends what in $VIMRUNTIME/macros. matchit.vim is a real work of
                            art, except of course that it rightly belongs in $VIMRUNTIME/plugin.


                            Best regards,
                            Tony.
                            --
                            This fortune intentionally not included.

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