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upgrading vim on linux

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  • e0richt@yahoo.com
    I seem to have a problem where I want to upgrade my version of gvim for linux but am somewhat confused by the site.... there seems to be a vim-7.1.tar.bz2....
    Message 1 of 8 , Mar 4, 2008
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      I seem to have a problem where I want to upgrade my version of gvim
      for linux but am somewhat confused by the site....

      there seems to be a vim-7.1.tar.bz2.... but I have no idea what a bz2
      file is and the site doesn't explain it (that I can find...).

      so I tried to use vim-6.4-src1.tar.gz and vim-6.4-src2.tar.gz and
      untar'ed them.
      according to the site you need to type "make install" and everything
      will work (assuming a c compiler and such...) but unfortunately, I
      couldn't find a "makefile"....

      Not sure why this couldn't be setup to be as easy as installing gvim
      for my windows box...



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    • Charles E Campbell Jr
      ... bunzip2 vim-7.1.tar.bz2 tar -xf vim-7.1.tar cd vim71 configure make make install Regards, Chip Campbell
      Message 2 of 8 , Mar 4, 2008
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        e0richt@... wrote:
        > I seem to have a problem where I want to upgrade my version of gvim
        > for linux but am somewhat confused by the site....
        >
        > there seems to be a vim-7.1.tar.bz2.... but I have no idea what a bz2
        > file is and the site doesn't explain it (that I can find...).
        >
        > so I tried to use vim-6.4-src1.tar.gz and vim-6.4-src2.tar.gz and
        > untar'ed them.
        > according to the site you need to type "make install" and everything
        > will work (assuming a c compiler and such...) but unfortunately, I
        > couldn't find a "makefile"....
        >
        > Not sure why this couldn't be setup to be as easy as installing gvim
        > for my windows box...
        >
        bunzip2 vim-7.1.tar.bz2
        tar -xf vim-7.1.tar
        cd vim71
        configure
        make
        make install

        Regards,
        Chip Campbell


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      • Fran├žois Ingelrest
        On Tue, Mar 4, 2008 at 4:58 PM, Charles E Campbell Jr ... I find the method using aap much simpler: http://www.a-a-p.org/ports.html It downloads all patches
        Message 3 of 8 , Mar 4, 2008
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          On Tue, Mar 4, 2008 at 4:58 PM, Charles E Campbell Jr
          <drchip@...> wrote:
          >
          > e0richt@... wrote:
          > > I seem to have a problem where I want to upgrade my version of gvim
          > > for linux but am somewhat confused by the site....
          > >
          > > there seems to be a vim-7.1.tar.bz2.... but I have no idea what a bz2
          > > file is and the site doesn't explain it (that I can find...).
          > >
          > > so I tried to use vim-6.4-src1.tar.gz and vim-6.4-src2.tar.gz and
          > > untar'ed them.
          > > according to the site you need to type "make install" and everything
          > > will work (assuming a c compiler and such...) but unfortunately, I
          > > couldn't find a "makefile"....
          > >
          > > Not sure why this couldn't be setup to be as easy as installing gvim
          > > for my windows box...
          > >
          > bunzip2 vim-7.1.tar.bz2
          > tar -xf vim-7.1.tar
          > cd vim71
          > configure
          > make
          > make install

          I find the method using aap much simpler:

          http://www.a-a-p.org/ports.html

          It downloads all patches automatically.

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        • Nico Weber
          ... bz2 is a compression format (like gz, but with better compression). On many systems, tar can uncompress tar.bz2 files directly if you do tar xfj
          Message 4 of 8 , Mar 4, 2008
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            > there seems to be a vim-7.1.tar.bz2.... but I have no idea what a bz2
            > file is and the site doesn't explain it (that I can find...).

            bz2 is a compression format (like gz, but with better compression). On
            many systems, tar can uncompress tar.bz2 files directly if you do

            tar xfj file.tar.bz2

            (that is, use a 'j' instead of the 'z' you use for tar.gz files).
            Here's the second hit of a google search for "bz2": http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bzip2

            > Not sure why this couldn't be setup to be as easy as installing gvim
            > for my windows box...

            There surely is a distribution-dependent way, that's "easy" (where
            "easy" means "similar to windows"). For example, I'm sure you can
            upgrade Vim through the add/remove programs dialog in Ubuntu. But
            uncompressing the source and doing `make && sudo make install` is what
            should work with all distributions.

            HTH,
            Nico

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          • Tony Mechelynck
            ... For more details (and a full step-by-step procedure the way I use it to keep Vim up-to-date on Linux) see
            Message 5 of 8 , Mar 4, 2008
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              Charles E Campbell Jr wrote:
              > e0richt@... wrote:
              >> I seem to have a problem where I want to upgrade my version of gvim
              >> for linux but am somewhat confused by the site....
              >>
              >> there seems to be a vim-7.1.tar.bz2.... but I have no idea what a bz2
              >> file is and the site doesn't explain it (that I can find...).
              >>
              >> so I tried to use vim-6.4-src1.tar.gz and vim-6.4-src2.tar.gz and
              >> untar'ed them.
              >> according to the site you need to type "make install" and everything
              >> will work (assuming a c compiler and such...) but unfortunately, I
              >> couldn't find a "makefile"....
              >>
              >> Not sure why this couldn't be setup to be as easy as installing gvim
              >> for my windows box...
              >>
              > bunzip2 vim-7.1.tar.bz2
              > tar -xf vim-7.1.tar
              > cd vim71
              > configure
              > make
              > make install
              >
              > Regards,
              > Chip Campbell

              For more details (and a full step-by-step procedure the way I use it to
              keep Vim up-to-date on Linux) see
              http://users.skynet.be/antoine.mechelynck/vim/compunix.htm

              One reason it's more complex on Linux is that there are a lot different
              Linux (and Unix) distributions, with nonuniform conventions as to where
              the runtime libraries are placed; also users have much more freedom
              about which software packages they want to install -- or not. You could
              say that the number of "possible" Unix/Linux systems is unbounded.
              Windows, OTOH, is distributed only by Microsoft, or at least, in a form
              strictly controlled by Microsoft. Compare the one CD or DVD for a given
              version of Windows with the plethora of CDs, DVDs, or online downloads
              released at approximately the same time by Red-Hat-Fedora, Novell-SuSE,
              Debian, Ubuntu, Gentoo, Mandriva, what-have-you. So, before we actually
              compile, we run a configure "program" to find out what software is
              sitting on the machine, where it is located, combine that with your
              configure options (such as --with-features=huge --enable-perlinterp
              etc.), and create a configure.mk which will be included by the
              src/Makefile invoked by the top-level Vim Makefile (Makefile, not
              makefile: case is significant in Unix/Linux filenames).

              This configure step also has advantages: you could say that it has the
              qualities of its defaults: it allows (almost) common treatment for not
              only various Linux distributions but also Unix and Unix-like systems
              which have nothing to do with Linux, such as BeOS, FreeBSD, even
              Mac-OS-X and VAX/VMS. The differences between all these only
              approximately similar systems are resolved at configure time with only
              very limited manual intervention. OTOH, when compiling for Windows,
              different Makefiles are needed to cater for something as elementary as
              different C compilers, hence the various Make_cyg.mak, Make_bc5.mak,
              Make_bc3.mak, Make_ming.mac, Make_mvc.mak, Make_w16.mak...


              Best regards,
              Tony.
              --
              Overflow on /dev/null, please empty the bit bucket.

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            • Charles E Campbell Jr
              ... Hello, Tony! Good explanation -- but (you knew that was coming!) vax/vms is pretty unlike unix. It falls into the totally dissimilar category (ie. not
              Message 6 of 8 , Mar 4, 2008
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                Tony Mechelynck wrote:
                > <snip>
                > This configure step also has advantages: you could say that it has the
                > qualities of its defaults: it allows (almost) common treatment for not
                > only various Linux distributions but also Unix and Unix-like systems
                > which have nothing to do with Linux, such as BeOS, FreeBSD, even
                > Mac-OS-X and VAX/VMS. The differences between all these only
                > approximately similar systems...<snip>

                Hello, Tony!

                Good explanation -- but (you knew that was coming!) vax/vms is pretty
                unlike unix. It falls into the totally dissimilar category (ie. not
                unix-like). For example, paths: [this.is.a.path]filename.ext ~
                /this/is/a/path/filename.ext . The Amiga is another dissimilar o/s, but
                I'd say its more similar to unix that vax/vms is.

                Anyway, to continue with Tony's point: the build & compile process is
                sufficiently flexible to handle totally dissimilar-to-unix operating
                systems such as AmigaDos and Vax/Vms.

                Regards,
                Chip Campbell


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              • Markus Heidelberg
                ... What Linux distribution do you use? Isn t there an up-to-date version of Vim available within your package manager? That s the normal way for end-users to
                Message 7 of 8 , Mar 4, 2008
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                  e0richt@..., Tuesday, 4. March 2008:
                  >
                  > Not sure why this couldn't be setup to be as easy as installing gvim
                  > for my windows box...

                  What Linux distribution do you use? Isn't there an up-to-date version of Vim
                  available within your package manager? That's the normal way for end-users to
                  install software and this is by far easier and more comfortable than installing
                  software on Windows.

                  Markus

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                • Yakov Lerner
                  You can try the scriptvim7-install.sh (attached) which downloads, builds and installs latest vim7 in one command without arguments. Description and download
                  Message 8 of 8 , Mar 6, 2008
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                    You can try the scriptvim7-install.sh (attached)
                    which downloads, builds and installs latest vim7
                    in one command without arguments.

                    Description and download link ia at:
                    http://www.vim.org/scripts/script.php?script_id=1473
                    Invocation:
                    sh ./vim7-install.sh

                    Or save the script directly from this link:
                    http://ilerner.3b1.org/vim7-install.sh

                    Attached.

                    Yakov

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