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Re: Bug in :runtime ?

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  • Bill McCarthy
    ... IMHO too many. One common example is passing a file to a program within Vim - the / appears to be treated like a switch in many windows programs. --
    Message 1 of 10 , Jul 26, 2006
      On Wed 26-Jul-06 1:20pm -0600, A.J.Mechelynck wrote:

      > Morality: Whenever possible, use / as path separator in Vim, even on
      > Windows. There are a few exceptions (where they don't work).

      IMHO too many. One common example is passing a file to a
      program within Vim - the '/' appears to be treated like a
      switch in many windows programs.

      --
      Best regards,
      Bill
    • A.J.Mechelynck
      ... $HOME/vimfiles and $HOME/vimfiles/after should be in your rtp (on Windows); the first place where Vim looks for your _vimrc is $HOME even though it is
      Message 2 of 10 , Jul 26, 2006
        Bill McCarthy wrote:
        > On Wed 26-Jul-06 12:45am -0600, A.J.Mechelynck wrote:
        >
        >> IIUC, it's a feature: \* means a literal asterisk. Not a very good
        >> feature since IIUC, asterisks are not allowed in filenames on Windows.
        >> Or can they happen in long file names?
        >
        > I know \* means a literal asterisk in a regex, but didn't
        > know it meant that in a file name. In fact I don't believe
        > that is true on Windows. For example,
        >
        > :arg .\*.c
        >
        > works as expected (like :arg *.c).
        >
        >>From your second point, AFAIK '*' is not valid in a
        > filename:
        >
        > [c:\pad]echo foo > "bar*"
        > 4NT: (Sys) The filename, directory name, or volume label syntax is incorrect.
        > "C:\pad\bar*"
        >
        >> ... Don't you have a HOME directory? On XP, I would expect that to
        >> default to %HOMEDRIVE%%HOME£PATH% if you don't define it (something like
        >> C:\Documents and Settings\<username> ) -- and, since XP is a multiuser
        >> OS, it allows each user to have a different set of preferences. $VIM,
        >> OTOH, would normally be something like C:\Program Files\Vim , which is
        >> the same for everyone.
        >
        > Yes, I have a HOME, but it is not in my rtp.
        >
        > :echo expand("~")
        > c:\util\home
        >
        > :echo $vim $vimruntime
        > c:\vim c:\vim\vim70
        >
        > But since I'm the only user of Vim/Gvim on this machine or
        > my home network, I don't take advantage of per user
        > settings.
        >

        $HOME/vimfiles and $HOME/vimfiles/after should be in your 'rtp' (on
        Windows); the first place where Vim looks for your _vimrc is $HOME even
        though it is not in 'rtp'. (And BTW, $VIM should not be in your 'rtp'
        either; but $VIM/vimfiles and $VIM/vimfiles/after -- and $VIMRUNTIME
        which, on version 7.0, is $VIM/vim70 -- should.)

        Yeah, and some day you'll activate the "Guest" user for your
        eight-years-old precocious nephew, or someone... Well, it's your funeral.


        Best regards,
        Tony.
      • Bill McCarthy
        ... From :h starting Recommended place for your personal initializations: MS-DOS and Win32 $HOME/_vimrc or $VIM/_vimrc I use the second choice. In an office
        Message 3 of 10 , Jul 26, 2006
          On Wed 26-Jul-06 5:03pm -0600, A.J.Mechelynck wrote:

          > $HOME/vimfiles and $HOME/vimfiles/after should be in your 'rtp' (on
          > Windows); the first place where Vim looks for your _vimrc is $HOME even
          > though it is not in 'rtp'. (And BTW, $VIM should not be in your 'rtp'
          > either; but $VIM/vimfiles and $VIM/vimfiles/after -- and $VIMRUNTIME
          > which, on version 7.0, is $VIM/vim70 -- should.)

          From :h starting

          Recommended place for your personal initializations:
          MS-DOS and Win32 $HOME/_vimrc or $VIM/_vimrc

          I use the second choice.

          In an office environment I do use the $home directory for
          all personalizations. But at home, I find it more
          convenient to not do this - nor do I rely on automatic
          assignment of $home (this can lead to using embedded spaces
          inside directory or filenames - an offense worthy of Gitmo
          :)

          My _vimrc contains:

          set runtimepath=$vimfiles,$vimruntime,$vimfiles\\after

          (I don't know where you got the idea that $vim was in there)
          where:

          let $vimfiles = $vim . '\vimfiles'

          is defined at the top of the file.

          --
          Best regards,
          Bill
        • A.J.Mechelynck
          ... I didn t; except you mentioned as a kind of justification that $HOME wasn t in it. Best regards, Tony.
          Message 4 of 10 , Jul 26, 2006
            Bill McCarthy wrote:
            > On Wed 26-Jul-06 5:03pm -0600, A.J.Mechelynck wrote:
            >
            >> $HOME/vimfiles and $HOME/vimfiles/after should be in your 'rtp' (on
            >> Windows); the first place where Vim looks for your _vimrc is $HOME even
            >> though it is not in 'rtp'. (And BTW, $VIM should not be in your 'rtp'
            >> either; but $VIM/vimfiles and $VIM/vimfiles/after -- and $VIMRUNTIME
            >> which, on version 7.0, is $VIM/vim70 -- should.)
            >
            >>From :h starting
            >
            > Recommended place for your personal initializations:
            > MS-DOS and Win32 $HOME/_vimrc or $VIM/_vimrc
            >
            > I use the second choice.
            >
            > In an office environment I do use the $home directory for
            > all personalizations. But at home, I find it more
            > convenient to not do this - nor do I rely on automatic
            > assignment of $home (this can lead to using embedded spaces
            > inside directory or filenames - an offense worthy of Gitmo
            > :)
            >
            > My _vimrc contains:
            >
            > set runtimepath=$vimfiles,$vimruntime,$vimfiles\\after
            >
            > (I don't know where you got the idea that $vim was in there)
            > where:
            >
            > let $vimfiles = $vim . '\vimfiles'
            >
            > is defined at the top of the file.
            >

            I didn't; except you mentioned as a kind of "justification" that $HOME
            wasn't in it.


            Best regards,
            Tony.
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