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Re: minor feature request: let!

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  • Nikolai Weibull
    ... And in any case, setting an option using let is very different from setting a user variable to a value. This is a case of Trying Too Hard . When exactly
    Message 1 of 10 , Jul 2, 2006
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      On 7/2/06, Yakov Lerner <iler.ml@...> wrote:
      > On 7/2/06, Mikolaj Machowski <mikmach@...> wrote:
      > > Dnia niedziela, 2 lipca 2006 12:06, Nikolai Weibull napisaƂ:
      > > > On 7/1/06, justin constantino <goflyapig@...> wrote:
      > > > > E706: Variable type mismatch
      > > > >
      > > > > As a minor improvement, I think it would be nice if you could do:
      > > > >
      > > > > let foo = "one,two,three"
      > > > > let! foo = split(foo, ',')
      > > >
      > > > I think we should just remove the whole restriction.
      > > >
      > > Definitely not. I was thinking about suggestion of :let! few times before
      > > and each time I was throwing it away. For example :let allows to change
      > > settings. Silently dropping changing of option value or setting it to
      > > some absurd setting would be Bad Thing(tm).
      >
      > I'd like to see how current :let is so super-intelligent
      > so that it prevents assignment of what you call "absurd setting"
      > to the &options.
      >
      > Consider string-to-number assignment rules.
      > :let &readonly="abc" " silently allowed
      > :let &shiftwidth="xyz" " silently allowed
      > :let &statusline=123 " silently allowed

      And in any case, setting an option using let is very different from
      setting a user variable to a value.

      This is a case of "Trying Too Hard".

      When exactly does this prevent you from making an error?

      It's only valid for options, and they have very different semantics
      from user variables. So just drop the check and allow people to reuse
      their variables if they like.

      nikolai
    • Hari Krishna Dara
      ... I recently sent a question to vim list about the same restriction. The restriction doesn t make any sense to me either. -- Thanks, Hari
      Message 2 of 10 , Jul 2, 2006
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        On Sun, 2 Jul 2006 at 12:06pm, Nikolai Weibull wrote:

        > On 7/1/06, justin constantino <goflyapig@...> wrote:
        >
        > > E706: Variable type mismatch
        >
        > > As a minor improvement, I think it would be nice if you could do:
        > >
        > > let foo = "one,two,three"
        > > let! foo = split(foo, ',')
        >
        > I think we should just remove the whole restriction.
        >
        > nikolai
        >

        I recently sent a question to vim list about the same restriction. The
        restriction doesn't make any sense to me either.

        --
        Thanks,
        Hari

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      • Bram Moolenaar
        ... Suppose someone asks you what the foo variable is for, what are you going answer? The point is: let the variable name reflect what it contains, don t
        Message 3 of 10 , Jul 9, 2006
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          Justin Constantino wrote:

          > Currently, if you try to assign a value to a variable with a different
          > type, you get:
          >
          > E706: Variable type mismatch
          >
          > To make it work, you have to first unlet the variable, which is kind
          > of annoying if the expression you are assigning references that
          > variable. For example, to split a string in-place, you have to do:
          >
          > let foo = "one,two,three"
          > let temp = split(foo, ',')
          > unlet foo
          > let foo = temp
          > unlet temp
          >
          > As a minor improvement, I think it would be nice if you could do:
          >
          > let foo = "one,two,three"
          > let! foo = split(foo, ',')

          Suppose someone asks you what the "foo" variable is for, what are you
          going answer?

          The point is: let the variable name reflect what it contains, don't
          re-use the same variable for something else. That way your code will be
          a lot more readable.

          let fooline = "one,two,three"
          let foowords = split(fooline, ',')

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          (Scott Adams - The Dilbert principle)

          /// Bram Moolenaar -- Bram@... -- http://www.Moolenaar.net \\\
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        • justin constantino
          ... Fair enough, but in most of the cases where this came up, I never really cared about the fooline variable. It only existed as an intermediate to
          Message 4 of 10 , Jul 13, 2006
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            On 7/9/06, Bram Moolenaar <Bram@...> wrote:
            >
            > Justin Constantino wrote:
            >
            > > Currently, if you try to assign a value to a variable with a different
            > > type, you get:
            > >
            > > E706: Variable type mismatch
            > >
            > > To make it work, you have to first unlet the variable, which is kind
            > > of annoying if the expression you are assigning references that
            > > variable. For example, to split a string in-place, you have to do:
            > >
            > > let foo = "one,two,three"
            > > let temp = split(foo, ',')
            > > unlet foo
            > > let foo = temp
            > > unlet temp
            > >
            > > As a minor improvement, I think it would be nice if you could do:
            > >
            > > let foo = "one,two,three"
            > > let! foo = split(foo, ',')
            >
            > Suppose someone asks you what the "foo" variable is for, what are you
            > going answer?
            >
            > The point is: let the variable name reflect what it contains, don't
            > re-use the same variable for something else. That way your code will be
            > a lot more readable.
            >
            > let fooline = "one,two,three"
            > let foowords = split(fooline, ',')
            >

            Fair enough, but in most of the cases where this came up, I never
            really cared about the 'fooline' variable. It only existed as an
            intermediate to 'foowords'. My choices were either: 1) put everything
            in one assignment, which can get long and messy and harder to read, or
            2) split it into two assignments by declaring an extra 'foowords' that
            I never really care about. Reusing the variable makes sense to me in
            this case, and this seemed like a harmless and logical addition, but I
            guess you're the Bram.
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