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OT: dictionaries

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  • Walter Briscoe
    I am conscious that this is probably off topic. However, while a spelling checker is being added to vim, I hope it has some relevance in the same way that a
    Message 1 of 4 , Nov 12, 2005
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      I am conscious that this is probably off topic. However, while a
      spelling checker is being added to vim, I hope it has some relevance in
      the same way that a thesaurus shows related words.

      I am looking for conventional dictionaries I can load on my machine. I
      prefer free software in the GNU sense but have found nothing.

      There is a "free for personal use" windoze English dictionary at
      http://wordweb.info/. It supports several locales including
      (alphabetically) america, australia, britain and canada. I recently read
      "A Short History of Myth". It contains a lot of technical philosophical
      English which was new to me. The short dictionary only failed once. (I
      did not note the failure.) The product has a neat "Type of" facility.
      For C, it says "3 A general-purpose programming language closely
      associated with the UNIX operating system". "Type of" leads to BASIC, C,
      COBOL, LISP, Pascal and PROLOG. I dislike the omission of ALGOL and
      FORTRAN but am impressed by the facility. "saint" ranges between ambrose
      and wynfrith. ;) The full version costs the equivalent of 20USD.
      Support seems good. I got a reply to an omission report within 24 hours.

      I have found no downloadable English-French translation-dictionary. My
      rugby-playing son needed talonneur for hooker for some schoolwork. My
      paperback Oxford French Dictionary @ 7.99UKP omits both talonneur and
      hooker. (I found the translation online at a URL I do not recall.)

      I can add a topicality veneer by asking how does one produce accented
      characters in vim where the glyph (wordweb meaning absent ;) is not on
      the keyboard. é (e+acute) can be put in a windose gvim document via
      charmap. In vim, the mapping does not work. ":help accent" is absent.
      "word" implements CTRL+'e.
      --
      Walter Briscoe
    • Peter Cech
      ... One can likely find better sources for French, but they have a bunch of other free dictionaries (and links to some more): http://www.dicts.info/ When you
      Message 2 of 4 , Nov 12, 2005
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        On Sat, Nov 12, 2005 at 08:56:14 +0000, Walter Briscoe wrote:
        > I have found no downloadable English-French translation-dictionary. My
        > rugby-playing son needed talonneur for hooker for some schoolwork. My
        > paperback Oxford French Dictionary @ 7.99UKP omits both talonneur and
        > hooker. (I found the translation online at a URL I do not recall.)

        One can likely find better sources for French, but they have a bunch of
        other free dictionaries (and links to some more):

        http://www.dicts.info/

        When you are there, feel free to contribute few words.

        > I can add a topicality veneer by asking how does one produce accented
        > characters in vim where the glyph (wordweb meaning absent ;) is not on
        > the keyboard. é (e+acute) can be put in a windose gvim document via
        > charmap. In vim, the mapping does not work. ":help accent" is absent.
        > "word" implements CTRL+'e.

        You can use digraphs (:help digraphs). You can enter é by pressing
        CTRL+K, e and '. Command :digraphs lists all active digraphs. The
        predefined set changes according to chosen encoding, so if you are
        missing something, try to change the encoding (utf-8 provides quite
        extensive set of characters).

        Regards,

        Peter
      • A. J. Mechelynck
        ... In European French, a hooker does translate as un talonneur (which I disn t know, but my Harraps Shorter English French told me -- 7th ed. 2004,
        Message 3 of 4 , Nov 12, 2005
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          Walter Briscoe wrote:
          > I am conscious that this is probably off topic. However, while a
          > spelling checker is being added to vim, I hope it has some relevance in
          > the same way that a thesaurus shows related words.
          >
          > I am looking for conventional dictionaries I can load on my machine. I
          > prefer free software in the GNU sense but have found nothing.
          >
          > There is a "free for personal use" windoze English dictionary at
          > http://wordweb.info/. It supports several locales including
          > (alphabetically) america, australia, britain and canada. I recently read
          > "A Short History of Myth". It contains a lot of technical philosophical
          > English which was new to me. The short dictionary only failed once. (I
          > did not note the failure.) The product has a neat "Type of" facility.
          > For C, it says "3 A general-purpose programming language closely
          > associated with the UNIX operating system". "Type of" leads to BASIC, C,
          > COBOL, LISP, Pascal and PROLOG. I dislike the omission of ALGOL and
          > FORTRAN but am impressed by the facility. "saint" ranges between ambrose
          > and wynfrith. ;) The full version costs the equivalent of 20USD.
          > Support seems good. I got a reply to an omission report within 24 hours.
          >
          > I have found no downloadable English-French translation-dictionary. My
          > rugby-playing son needed talonneur for hooker for some schoolwork. My
          > paperback Oxford French Dictionary @ 7.99UKP omits both talonneur and
          > hooker. (I found the translation online at a URL I do not recall.)

          In European French, "a hooker" does translate as "un talonneur" (which I
          disn't know, but my Harraps Shorter English <=> French told me -- 7th
          ed. 2004, xiv+1102+16+82+68+964pp slightly smaller than A4). However, in
          its more familiar use (a girl pacing the street waiting for a customer),
          I would have translated it as "une fille qui fait du racolage" or (maybe
          better but dated) "une péripatéticienne"; the same dictionary says "esp.
          Am., Fam., = prostitute: une putain". It does mention "péripatéticienne"
          with the translation "streetwalker, prostitute". If your paperback
          Oxford E-F doesn't even mention that other meaning of "hooker" it's not
          worth the £8 you paid for it.

          >
          > I can add a topicality veneer by asking how does one produce accented
          > characters in vim where the glyph (wordweb meaning absent ;) is not on
          > the keyboard. é (e+acute) can be put in a windose gvim document via
          > charmap. In vim, the mapping does not work. ":help accent" is absent.
          > "word" implements CTRL+'e.

          In Vim, if you don't have some accented letter on your keyboard, you can
          either set a keymap, or use digraphs. You can also enter them by their
          character code if you know it (decimal, octal or hex if single-byte, hex
          only for multibyte Unicode codepoints). Keymaps are better for
          non-Latin-Alphabet laguages or for systematic use, digraphs for accented
          Latin letters or for sporadic use, hex entry for exceptional Unicode
          codepoints not present in your keymap. To enter é (e acute) in Vim
          (assuming your current 'encoding' allows it), type Ctrl-K, e-for-echo,
          apostrophe (three keypresses, or maybe three and one-half depending how
          you count).

          Oh, and I forgot (probably because I use it the other way round):
          anything you can type in one program can be transferred to another via
          the clipboard (I use it mostly from gvim to Firefox but the reverse
          works equally well).

          See
          :help 'keymap'
          :help digraphs
          :help i_CTRL-V_digit
          :help registers

          HTH,
          Tony.
        • Charles E. Campbell, Jr.
          ... will get you started on this. Alternatively, you can try EasyAccents.vim, so that one types a (or a depending on the existence&value of the variable
          Message 4 of 4 , Nov 14, 2005
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            Walter Briscoe wrote:

            >I can add a topicality veneer by asking how does one produce accented
            >characters in vim where the glyph (wordweb meaning absent ;) is not on
            >the keyboard. é (e+acute) can be put in a windose gvim document via
            >charmap. In vim, the mapping does not work. ":help accent" is absent.
            >"word" implements CTRL+'e.
            >
            >
            :he digraph

            will get you started on this. Alternatively, you can try
            EasyAccents.vim, so that one types
            a' (or 'a depending on the existence&value of the variable
            "g:EasyAccents_VowelFirst")
            and gets an appropriately accented vowel (a' a` a: etc). EasyAccents is
            available at:
            http://vim.sourceforge.net/scripts/script.php?script_id=451

            Good luck!
            Charles Campbell
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