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Regarding visual prompting for abbreviations

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  • Noah Scales
    Hello. This is a feature request for vim 7(or 8). The feature is a visual prompt for completions of ordinary language words AND phrases that responds to your
    Message 1 of 6 , Aug 8, 2005
      Hello.

      This is a feature request for vim 7(or 8).

      The feature is a visual prompt for completions of
      ordinary language words AND phrases that responds to
      your keystrokes as if you're typing abbreviations, but
      doesn't require that you know any. The feature instead
      interprets what you're typing as a sequence of the
      first letters occuring in the phrases available to
      view. A product that has this feature is InstantText,
      made by Textware Solutions, Inc. The marketers at
      www.textware.com refer to it as no-memorization-needed
      abbreviations, but it also works like a
      text-completion feature. I'm familiar with text
      completion in an IDE because of my experience using
      Microsoft's VBA programming environment, and I own a
      copy of Instanttext ($200!), and the two are
      completely different. This visual prompt system that
      I'm describing enables much more general and flexible
      text completion than any IDE can provide. The visual
      prompt lets anyone take advantage of text completion
      with great efficiency, allowing abbreviation of
      literally 1000's, even 10's of 1000's of words and
      phrases. The textware website is translated Auf
      Deutsch and En Francais, as well as in English, and
      discusses this feature in their Instanttext product
      more than I can do it justice.

      Now that I use Linux full-time, I'm wanting a
      replacement (even partial if the concept is covered by
      patents) for the only software program that tempts me
      to return to windows. So I hope this feature request
      is of interest.

      -Noah Scales



      ____________________________________________________
      Start your day with Yahoo! - make it your home page
      http://www.yahoo.com/r/hs
    • Stefan Karlsson
      Are you familiar with Vim s completion as it is implemented today? I believe it suppports many of the features you mention. For instance, it can complete words
      Message 2 of 6 , Aug 8, 2005
        Are you familiar with Vim's completion as it is implemented today? I
        believe it suppports many of the features you mention. For instance, it
        can complete words based on other words in your text (even in other
        files than the one you're currently editing). You can also tie it to
        dictionaries, thesauruses and tag files.

        :help ins-completion gives you the full story.


        Regards,

        -- Stefan


        Noah Scales wrote:

        >Hello.
        >
        >This is a feature request for vim 7(or 8).
        >
        >The feature is a visual prompt for completions of
        >ordinary language words AND phrases that responds to
        >your keystrokes as if you're typing abbreviations, but
        >doesn't require that you know any. The feature instead
        >interprets what you're typing as a sequence of the
        >first letters occuring in the phrases available to
        >view. A product that has this feature is InstantText,
        >made by Textware Solutions, Inc. The marketers at
        >www.textware.com refer to it as no-memorization-needed
        >abbreviations, but it also works like a
        >text-completion feature. I'm familiar with text
        >completion in an IDE because of my experience using
        >Microsoft's VBA programming environment, and I own a
        >copy of Instanttext ($200!), and the two are
        >completely different. This visual prompt system that
        >I'm describing enables much more general and flexible
        >text completion than any IDE can provide. The visual
        >prompt lets anyone take advantage of text completion
        >with great efficiency, allowing abbreviation of
        >literally 1000's, even 10's of 1000's of words and
        >phrases. The textware website is translated Auf
        >Deutsch and En Francais, as well as in English, and
        >discusses this feature in their Instanttext product
        >more than I can do it justice.
        >
        >Now that I use Linux full-time, I'm wanting a
        >replacement (even partial if the concept is covered by
        >patents) for the only software program that tempts me
        >to return to windows. So I hope this feature request
        >is of interest.
        >
        >-Noah Scales
        >
        >
        >
        >____________________________________________________
        >Start your day with Yahoo! - make it your home page
        >http://www.yahoo.com/r/hs
        >
        >
        >
        >
      • Noah Scales
        I accidentally sent my reply just to Stefan. Here is a similar reply to the list. (sorry, Stefan, to send you this information twice.) The feature suggestion
        Message 3 of 6 , Aug 8, 2005
          I accidentally sent my reply just to Stefan. Here is
          a similar reply to the list. (sorry, Stefan, to send
          you this information twice.)

          The feature suggestion is for something like ambigous
          abbreviation expansion. Each abbreviation is built
          according to the rule that each letter of the
          abbreviation is the first letter of each sequential
          word in a phrase, found in a document that VIm knows
          about.

          So if you type:

          titw

          Vim prompts you with a number of abbreviations that
          start with titw, including:

          1. tilting into the wind
          2. tilting into the wind, he rode hard
          3. this is the way
          4. this is the way from here
          5. type into the window
          6. type into the window above the prompt area

          then you type a row number from the list to choose
          your expansion for "titw". For example, '6', giving
          you:

          titw6

          and you confirm that with a key like ';', so you have
          typed:

          titw6;

          and that Vim immediately expands 'titw6;' to:

          type into the window above the prompt area

          You use an abbreviation for a long phrase, but you
          don't have to memorize it. You simply know how the
          abbreviation was built, and then select your expansion
          from Vim's visual prompt of a list of possible
          expansions. This is somewhat similar to
          text-completion in the MS VBA IDE, where objects and
          properties appear on lists in front of what you type,
          and you can select from the alternatives to choose the
          object or property.
          The difference is that this works with long English
          phrases, instead of object names and property names.

          And you can use prediction with this feature, like an
          IDE does text completion, so that after typing
          'titw6;' you are prompted with another list that Vim
          thinks you want to follow your selected phrase (type
          into the window above the prompt area) with. Vim
          builds this new list from a frequency analysis of the
          document containing all the phrases that its phrase
          expansions are built from. For example, the list:

          1. to start the expansion.
          2. to start the expansion of your text.
          3. to begin editing.
          4. to begin editing your file.
          5. to write into your document.

          and you can select again immediately, so that you have
          typed:

          titw6;2;

          and Vim produces the expansion:

          type into the window above the prompt area to start
          the expansion of your text.

          (to have capitalized the sentence, you would have used
          typed 'Titw6;2;', letting VIm auto-capitalize the
          first word in the expansion for you.)
          Using this on-the-fly expansion feature, you didn't
          memorize 'titw6;2;', but you saved more than 70% of
          the keystrokes needed to type your expansion.

          This concept is similar to what IDE's use, so I doubt
          its legally protected. Tech writers and
          transcriptionists who work with linux will welcome
          this feature, if you implement it.

          -Noah


          --- Stefan Karlsson <stefan.74@...> wrote:

          > Are you familiar with Vim's completion as it is
          > implemented today? I
          > believe it suppports many of the features you
          > mention. For instance, it
          > can complete words based on other words in your text
          > (even in other
          > files than the one you're currently editing). You
          > can also tie it to
          > dictionaries, thesauruses and tag files.
          >
          > :help ins-completion gives you the full story.
          >
          >
          > Regards,
          >
          > -- Stefan
          >
          >
          > Noah Scales wrote:
          >
          > >Hello.
          > >
          > >This is a feature request for vim 7(or 8).
          > >
          > >The feature is a visual prompt for completions of
          > >ordinary language words AND phrases that responds
          > to
          > >your keystrokes as if you're typing abbreviations,
          > but
          > >doesn't require that you know any. The feature
          > instead
          > >interprets what you're typing as a sequence of the
          > >first letters occuring in the phrases available to
          > >view. A product that has this feature is
          > InstantText,
          > >made by Textware Solutions, Inc. The marketers at
          > >www.textware.com refer to it as
          > no-memorization-needed
          > >abbreviations, but it also works like a
          > >text-completion feature. I'm familiar with text
          > >completion in an IDE because of my experience using
          > >Microsoft's VBA programming environment, and I own
          > a
          > >copy of Instanttext ($200!), and the two are
          > >completely different. This visual prompt system
          > that
          > >I'm describing enables much more general and
          > flexible
          > >text completion than any IDE can provide. The
          > visual
          > >prompt lets anyone take advantage of text
          > completion
          > >with great efficiency, allowing abbreviation of
          > >literally 1000's, even 10's of 1000's of words and
          > >phrases. The textware website is translated Auf
          > >Deutsch and En Francais, as well as in English, and
          > >discusses this feature in their Instanttext product
          > >more than I can do it justice.
          > >
          > >Now that I use Linux full-time, I'm wanting a
          > >replacement (even partial if the concept is covered
          > by
          > >patents) for the only software program that tempts
          > me
          > >to return to windows. So I hope this feature
          > request
          > >is of interest.
          > >
          > >-Noah Scales
          > >
          > >
          > >
          >
          >____________________________________________________
          > >Start your day with Yahoo! - make it your home page
          >
          > >http://www.yahoo.com/r/hs
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          >


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        • Bram Moolenaar
          ... Sounds like a nice idea. I suppose the method is to look in the text for words that have the characters used in the abbreviation. That would be quite
          Message 4 of 6 , Aug 9, 2005
            Noah Scales wrote:

            > This is a feature request for vim 7(or 8).
            >
            > The feature is a visual prompt for completions of
            > ordinary language words AND phrases that responds to
            > your keystrokes as if you're typing abbreviations, but
            > doesn't require that you know any. The feature instead
            > interprets what you're typing as a sequence of the
            > first letters occuring in the phrases available to
            > view. A product that has this feature is InstantText,
            > made by Textware Solutions, Inc. The marketers at
            > www.textware.com refer to it as no-memorization-needed
            > abbreviations, but it also works like a
            > text-completion feature. I'm familiar with text
            > completion in an IDE because of my experience using
            > Microsoft's VBA programming environment, and I own a
            > copy of Instanttext ($200!), and the two are
            > completely different. This visual prompt system that
            > I'm describing enables much more general and flexible
            > text completion than any IDE can provide. The visual
            > prompt lets anyone take advantage of text completion
            > with great efficiency, allowing abbreviation of
            > literally 1000's, even 10's of 1000's of words and
            > phrases. The textware website is translated Auf
            > Deutsch and En Francais, as well as in English, and
            > discusses this feature in their Instanttext product
            > more than I can do it justice.
            >
            > Now that I use Linux full-time, I'm wanting a
            > replacement (even partial if the concept is covered by
            > patents) for the only software program that tempts me
            > to return to windows. So I hope this feature request
            > is of interest.

            Sounds like a nice idea. I suppose the method is to look in the text
            for words that have the characters used in the abbreviation. That would
            be quite simple, just requires a fuzzy word compare function. The rest
            of the mechanism is already there: Insert mode completion.

            Is this covered by a patent perhaps? Or is this some old algorithm
            known in literature?

            --
            hundred-and-one symptoms of being an internet addict:
            27. You refer to your age as 3.x.

            /// Bram Moolenaar -- Bram@... -- http://www.Moolenaar.net \\\
            /// Sponsor Vim, vote for features -- http://www.Vim.org/sponsor/ \\\
            \\\ Project leader for A-A-P -- http://www.A-A-P.org ///
            \\\ Buy LOTR 3 and help AIDS victims -- http://ICCF.nl/lotr.html ///
          • Noah Scales
            Hello, Mr. Moolenaar. Yes, insert-mode completion would be fine with me, if that is convenient for you. I can t answer your questions about patents and public
            Message 5 of 6 , Aug 9, 2005
              Hello, Mr. Moolenaar.

              Yes, insert-mode completion would be fine with me, if
              that is convenient for you. I can't answer your
              questions about patents and public software
              algorithms, I'm afraid, but maybe someone else can. I
              mentioned patents only because I didn't want you to
              think there was 0% likelihood of Textware Solutions,
              Inc., or someone else, raising that objection sometime
              further along. But I really hope this feature gets
              into an upcoming release of VIm, and I am not terribly
              worried about patents.

              Mr. Moolenaar, thank you for your time, and for your
              wonderful software product. Thanks also to the other
              members of this list, including Stefan, for your
              follow-up about the current completion features in
              available in VIm.

              I'm going to unsubscribe from the list now - the
              feature request that I made was my only reason for
              subscribing. If for any reason any of you would like
              to contact me, you can email me directly at:
              noahjscales@....

              Thanks again for your time.

              -Noah Scales

              --- Bram Moolenaar <Bram@...> wrote:

              >
              > Noah Scales wrote:
              >
              > > This is a feature request for vim 7(or 8).
              > >
              > > The feature is a visual prompt for completions of
              > > ordinary language words AND phrases that responds
              > to
              > > your keystrokes as if you're typing abbreviations,
              > but
              > > doesn't require that you know any. The feature
              > instead
              > > interprets what you're typing as a sequence of the
              > > first letters occuring in the phrases available to
              > > view. A product that has this feature is
              > InstantText,
              > > made by Textware Solutions, Inc. The marketers at
              > > www.textware.com refer to it as
              > no-memorization-needed
              > > abbreviations, but it also works like a
              > > text-completion feature. I'm familiar with text
              > > completion in an IDE because of my experience
              > using
              > > Microsoft's VBA programming environment, and I own
              > a
              > > copy of Instanttext ($200!), and the two are
              > > completely different. This visual prompt system
              > that
              > > I'm describing enables much more general and
              > flexible
              > > text completion than any IDE can provide. The
              > visual
              > > prompt lets anyone take advantage of text
              > completion
              > > with great efficiency, allowing abbreviation of
              > > literally 1000's, even 10's of 1000's of words and
              > > phrases. The textware website is translated Auf
              > > Deutsch and En Francais, as well as in English,
              > and
              > > discusses this feature in their Instanttext
              > product
              > > more than I can do it justice.
              > >
              > > Now that I use Linux full-time, I'm wanting a
              > > replacement (even partial if the concept is
              > covered by
              > > patents) for the only software program that tempts
              > me
              > > to return to windows. So I hope this feature
              > request
              > > is of interest.
              >
              > Sounds like a nice idea. I suppose the method is to
              > look in the text
              > for words that have the characters used in the
              > abbreviation. That would
              > be quite simple, just requires a fuzzy word compare
              > function. The rest
              > of the mechanism is already there: Insert mode
              > completion.
              >
              > Is this covered by a patent perhaps? Or is this
              > some old algorithm
              > known in literature?
              >
              > --
              > hundred-and-one symptoms of being an internet
              > addict:
              > 27. You refer to your age as 3.x.
              >
              > /// Bram Moolenaar -- Bram@... --
              > http://www.Moolenaar.net \\\
              > /// Sponsor Vim, vote for features --
              > http://www.Vim.org/sponsor/ \\\
              > \\\ Project leader for A-A-P --
              > http://www.A-A-P.org ///
              > \\\ Buy LOTR 3 and help AIDS victims --
              > http://ICCF.nl/lotr.html ///
              >




              ____________________________________________________
              Start your day with Yahoo! - make it your home page
              http://www.yahoo.com/r/hs
            • Marian Csontos
              Hello Mr.Scales, somethineg simillar you want to do is possible with Vim7 new feature - custom completion with . I ve just submitted my first
              Message 6 of 6 , Aug 9, 2005
                Hello Mr.Scales,
                somethineg simillar you want to do is possible with Vim7 new feature -
                custom completion with <CTRL-X><CTRL-U>.
                I've just submitted my first tip to vim.sourceforge.net using this feature:
                http://vim.sourceforge.net/tips/tip.php?tip_id=968

                Probably this could be changed to do, what you want. Now it completes only
                keywords found in your currently opened file. (I don't know if is possible
                to search in files without opening them. At least search pattern could be
                changed to look for more words instead one only)
                let s:re = '\<'.substitute(line,a:anyre,'\\k*',"g").'\>'
                should be changed to
                let s:re = '\<'.substitute(line,a:anyre,'\\k*\\s\+',"g").'\>'
                to search for more words.

                But I suppose it will be rather slow, so better is to made your own
                complete function. What is your experience with vim? Because it could be
                quite difficult for novice...

                Problem with other non-custom kinds of completion is they are completing
                keywords only. You could add spaces and interpuction to keywords, but it
                seems crazy. Probably thesaurus could be used for this if it allowed
                spaces, IMO it should, because of phrasal verbs.

                Request: new type of completion, like thesaurus, but with another format:

                keyword any sentnece, allowing any characters, also spaces.
                keyword2 how to handle specials, like:\n\t- line-breaks,\n\t- and
                tabulators?
                ...

                Completion should work also with prefixes, so key returns 1st and 2nd
                sentence, but keyword2 only first one...

                Of course this could be easily done with some script too.

                -- Marian


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