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Re: VIM 7.0026: A Patch for Make_mvc.mak and failed tests

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  • Walter Briscoe
    In message of Sat, 1 Jan 2005 07:17:02 in , Johnny Blaze writes ... Scenario? Numbers? --
    Message 1 of 27 , Jan 1, 2005
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      In message <804f592d04123117177ef4e581@...> of Sat, 1 Jan
      2005 07:17:02 in , Johnny Blaze <pyromancer@...> writes
      >On Fri, 31 Dec 2004 13:24:28 -0800, George V. Reilly <george@...> wrote:
      >> Does Vim actually generate code that uses SSE2 instructions or does it
      >> notably benefit from P4-specific optimizations? Vim is fast on modern
      >> hardware.
      >
      >I runs faster for me with the optimizations.

      Scenario? Numbers?
      --
      Walter Briscoe
    • Johnny Blaze
      test11 and test30 still fail. I used cvs co -kb vim7/src/testdir after removing testdir. -kb is supposed to use the same line endings as stored in CVS. On
      Message 2 of 27 , Jan 2, 2005
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        test11 and test30 still fail. I used "cvs co -kb vim7/src/testdir"
        after removing testdir. -kb is supposed to use the same line endings
        as stored in CVS.

        On a related note, have you considered switching the repository to
        subversion? (http://subversion.tigris.org) There are scripts to
        convert a CVS repository to a Subversion repository.... :-)



        On Sat, 01 Jan 2005 17:37:57 +0100, Bram Moolenaar <Bram@...> wrote:
        >
        > Johnny Blaze wrote:
        >
        > > On Sat, 01 Jan 2005 14:23:06 +0100, Bram Moolenaar <Bram@...> wrote:
        > >
        > > > I would think that for CVS all test files should actually NOT be marked
        > > > binary, so that the line endings are adjusted. Problem is that this
        > > > process apparently fails to work properly, not adding a CR to a line
        > > > that already ends in a CR. I don't know how to solve that...
        > > >
        > > > Otherwise, we would need to run a script that fixes the fileformats
        > > > before running the actual tests. It seems using this in
        > > > src/testdir/Make_dos.mak works:
        > > >
        > > > nongui: fixff $(SCRIPTS16) $(SCRIPTS)
        > > > echo ALL DONE
        > > >
        > > > small: fixff $(SCRIPTS16)
        > > > echo ALL DONE
        > > >
        > > > gui: fixff $(SCRIPTS16) $(SCRIPTS) $(SCRIPTS_GUI)
        > > > echo ALL DONE
        > > >
        > > > win32: fixff $(SCRIPTS16) $(SCRIPTS) $(SCRIPTS32)
        > > > echo ALL DONE
        > > >
        > > > fixff:
        > > > -$(VIMPROG) -u dos.vim --noplugin "+argdo set ff=dos|upd" +q *.in *.ok
        > > >
        > > > If this works properly then ALL files in src/testdir can be marked binary.
        > >
        > > test30 and test11 still fail with fixff added. I could only get
        > > test11 to be successful if I change the line in test11.in:"set nobin
        > > ff&" to "set nobin ff=unix". test30 is only successful if I restore
        > > test30.ok from the snapshot (and keep fixff from changing it).
        >
        > Did you check out the files in Unix mode, thus without CVS doing any CR
        > adding? I suspect it only adds a CR when there isn't one already, that
        > breaks the tests. Vim adds a CR to every line, then it should be OK.
        >
        > --
        > $ echo pizza > /dev/oven
        >
        > /// Bram Moolenaar -- Bram@... -- http://www.Moolenaar.net \\\
        > /// Sponsor Vim, vote for features -- http://www.Vim.org/sponsor/ \\\
        > \\\ Project leader for A-A-P -- http://www.A-A-P.org ///
        > \\\ Buy LOTR 3 and help AIDS victims -- http://ICCF.nl/lotr.html ///
        >


        --

        . o O pyromancer O o .
      • Bram Moolenaar
        ... test11 fails if gzip is not available. Perhaps that s the problem you are encountering? It appears the test[11|30].[in|ok] files in CVS are identical to
        Message 3 of 27 , Jan 2, 2005
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          Johnny Blaze wrote:

          > test11 and test30 still fail. I used "cvs co -kb vim7/src/testdir"
          > after removing testdir. -kb is supposed to use the same line endings
          > as stored in CVS.

          test11 fails if gzip is not available. Perhaps that's the problem you
          are encountering?

          It appears the test[11|30].[in|ok] files in CVS are identical to what I
          have. Another cause for problems is a diff program that can't handle
          the different line endings.

          > On a related note, have you considered switching the repository to
          > subversion? (http://subversion.tigris.org) There are scripts to
          > convert a CVS repository to a Subversion repository.... :-)

          It has been considered. There are two problems:
          (1) we don't have a reliable repository for subversion (SourceForge
          doesn't support it).
          (2) Not many people have it, thus we would have to keep the CVS
          repository as well.

          Since we are using CVS for distribution and keeping old versions, not
          for actual development, it's not much use to switch to subversion.

          --
          hundred-and-one symptoms of being an internet addict:
          211. Your husband leaves you...taking the computer with him and you
          call him crying, and beg him to bring the computer back.

          /// Bram Moolenaar -- Bram@... -- http://www.Moolenaar.net \\\
          /// Sponsor Vim, vote for features -- http://www.Vim.org/sponsor/ \\\
          \\\ Project leader for A-A-P -- http://www.A-A-P.org ///
          \\\ Buy LOTR 3 and help AIDS victims -- http://ICCF.nl/lotr.html ///
        • Johnny Blaze
          ... hmm... I am using the current versions of both diff and gzip from gnuwin32.sf.net ... I ll check into diff and see if they have fiddled with it. Thanks
          Message 4 of 27 , Jan 2, 2005
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            On Sun, 02 Jan 2005 22:33:08 +0100, Bram Moolenaar <Bram@...> wrote:
            >
            > Johnny Blaze wrote:
            >
            > > test11 and test30 still fail. I used "cvs co -kb vim7/src/testdir"
            > > after removing testdir. -kb is supposed to use the same line endings
            > > as stored in CVS.
            >
            > test11 fails if gzip is not available. Perhaps that's the problem you
            > are encountering?
            >
            > It appears the test[11|30].[in|ok] files in CVS are identical to what I
            > have. Another cause for problems is a diff program that can't handle
            > the different line endings.

            hmm... I am using the current versions of both diff and gzip from
            gnuwin32.sf.net ... I'll check into diff and see if they have fiddled
            with it. Thanks Bram.

            > > On a related note, have you considered switching the repository to
            > > subversion? (http://subversion.tigris.org) There are scripts to
            > > convert a CVS repository to a Subversion repository.... :-)
            >
            > It has been considered. There are two problems:
            > (1) we don't have a reliable repository for subversion (SourceForge
            > doesn't support it).
            > (2) Not many people have it, thus we would have to keep the CVS
            > repository as well.

            1: ww.tigris.org (for project hosting) and svn.collab.net (for the
            subverison repository hosting)

            > Since we are using CVS for distribution and keeping old versions, not
            > for actual development, it's not much use to switch to subversion.

            okay... Subversion is my new favorite toy (okay, second favorite
            behind vim :-)... just thought I would share :-)

            --

            . o O pyromancer O o .
          • George V. Reilly
            [Adding vim-dev back, since I inadvertently dropped them] [!#@!@# qmail bounced the first copy of this since it was in HTML] ... native ... It s talking about
            Message 5 of 27 , Jan 2, 2005
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              [Adding vim-dev back, since I inadvertently dropped them]
              [!#@!@# qmail bounced the first copy of this since it was in HTML]

              Johnny Blaze wrote:
              >George V. Reilly <george@...> wrote:
              >>According to
              >>http://msdn.microsoft.com/library/en-us/vccore/html/_core_.2f.z7.2c_2f.zd.2c_2f.zi.asp
              >>it does no such thing.
              >>
              >>/Zi can affect the runtime performance of *managed* code, but Vim is
              native
              >>code. The /clr flag is not present in the compiler flags. Generating
              >>debugger information can also make the compilation a little slower.
              >
              >From the link you gave:
              >
              >"This attribute can affect the runtime performance of the application.
              >For more information about how the Debuggable attribute affects
              >performance and how you can modify the performance impact, see Making
              >an Image Easier to Debug."
              >
              >Its unclear to me as to whether this is talking about the combination
              >of /Zi and /clr ("This attribute" not "these attributes"). or /Zi
              >alone.

              It's talking about the "Debuggable" attribute from the preceding
              sentence, which you omitted. /Zi and /clr are _options_ to the compiler.
              Debuggable is an _attribute_ in the the assembly metadata. There are no
              assemblies in the unmanaged world.

              Compare the language in the description for the VC6 compiler, which was
              the last compiler before .NET:
              http://msdn.microsoft.com/library/en-us/vccore98/html/_core_.2f.z7.2c_2f.zd.2c_2f.zi.asp

              /Zi Produces a program database (PDB) that contains type
              information and symbolic debugging information for use with
              the debugger. The symbolic debugging information includes
              the names and types of variables, as well as functions
              and line numbers.

              It doesn't say anything about performance, for the good reason that /Zi
              doesn't affect performance.

              I used to be the Performance Lead for IIS. Here are some performance
              articles that I wrote, which may convince you that I know something
              about the subject:
              http://msdn.microsoft.com/workshop/server/asp/asptips.asp
              http://www.microsoft.com/technet/prodtechnol/windows2000serv/technologies/iis/maintain/optimize/iis5tune.mspx
              http://msdn.microsoft.com/workshop/server/iis/tencom.asp

              But here's an even better way to convince yourself. Use the /FAcs option
              to generate a .cod (combined machine, source, and assembly listing)
              file. Try this on several Vim source files, both with and without /Zi.
              Let us know if you find a real difference in code generation.

              >> I don't know about you, but I often need to debug optimized code, and
              >>without symbols, it's a pain. You don't have to ship the symbols. Just
              >>archive them for major releases.
              >
              >Why can't this be a separate option? (PDB=yes) Does the vast majority
              >of people compiling a SSE2 optimized, no-debug version of vim with
              >MSVC need debugging information?

              The debugging information is essentially free, because almost all of it
              ends up in the PDB symbols file. You just get a small amount of
              metainformation in the EXE, which makes it slightly larger, but no slower.

              Microsoft builds all binaries with debugging information and archives
              the PDBs on symbol servers. This helps enormously when crashes happen in
              the field. These symbols are available for developers to use with
              Windbg/ntsd/kd: see
              http://www.microsoft.com/whdc/devtools/debugging/symbols.mspx

              One other thing. I'd recommend using the /GS flag, which inserts stack
              canaries to detect stack buffer overruns. All the binaries in Windows XP
              SP2 and in Windows Server 2003 are compiled with this flag.
              http://msdn.microsoft.com/library/en-us/vccore/html/vclrfGSBufferSecurity.asp
              http://blogs.msdn.com/branbray/archive/2003/11/11/51012.aspx
              --
              1) The project is on schedule.
              2) I just fixed the last bug.
              3) I only changed one little thing.
              4) This will take just a minute.
              -- The four great lies of computing
              (Get Witty Auto-Generated Signatures from http://SmartBee.org)
              George V. Reilly george@...
              http://george.reilly.org/
              Read my blog: http://weblogs.asp.net/george_v_reilly/
            • Johnny Blaze
              ... oh, I didn t mean to imply that you weren t who you said you are, or to indicate that you didn t know what you were talking about, I was just going off of
              Message 6 of 27 , Jan 3, 2005
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                On Sun, 02 Jan 2005 22:08:19 -0800, George V. Reilly <george@...> wrote:
                > I used to be the Performance Lead for IIS. Here are some performance
                > articles that I wrote, which may convince you that I know something
                > about the subject:
                > http://msdn.microsoft.com/workshop/server/asp/asptips.asp
                > http://www.microsoft.com/technet/prodtechnol/windows2000serv/technologies/iis/maintain/optimize/iis5tune.mspx
                > http://msdn.microsoft.com/workshop/server/iis/tencom.asp

                oh, I didn't mean to imply that you weren't who you said you are, or
                to indicate that you didn't know what you were talking about, I was
                just going off of my understanding of the Microsoft Docs. I
                appreciate the information.

                --

                . o O pyromancer O o .
              • Johnny Blaze
                ... Bram, The problem with test11 appears to be the gnuwin32 port of sed. This version of sed operates in text mode by default, which changes line-endings to
                Message 7 of 27 , Jan 3, 2005
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                  On Sun, 02 Jan 2005 22:33:08 +0100, Bram Moolenaar <Bram@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > Johnny Blaze wrote:
                  >
                  > > test11 and test30 still fail. I used "cvs co -kb vim7/src/testdir"
                  > > after removing testdir. -kb is supposed to use the same line endings
                  > > as stored in CVS.
                  >
                  > test11 fails if gzip is not available. Perhaps that's the problem you
                  > are encountering?
                  >
                  > It appears the test[11|30].[in|ok] files in CVS are identical to what I
                  > have. Another cause for problems is a diff program that can't handle
                  > the different line endings.

                  Bram,

                  The problem with test11 appears to be the gnuwin32 port of sed. This
                  version of sed operates in text mode by default, which changes
                  line-endings to the native system (only if sed changes something, if
                  you run a cat-like sed script, it appears to put out what you put in).
                  If you run it in binary mode, it leaves line-endings alone.

                  I changed the sed command in test11.in to sed -B s/e/E ... and it works fine.

                  Again on test30, If I put the snapshot-zip version of test30.ok in the
                  working directory and cvs update test30.ok it shows that it was
                  locally modified. If I cvs update -kb test30.ok (-kb is supposed to
                  use the same line-endings as stored in the repos.) it still shows
                  modified. Vim sees test30.ok as ff=unix, so fixff will cause test30
                  to fail if you put the snapshot version in.

                  --

                  . o O pyromancer O o .
                • Walter Briscoe
                  In message of Tue, 4 Jan 2005 09:40:59 in , Johnny Blaze writes ... -B is not a standard
                  Message 8 of 27 , Jan 4, 2005
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                    In message <804f592d05010319402ef2deab@...> of Tue, 4 Jan
                    2005 09:40:59 in , Johnny Blaze <pyromancer@...> writes
                    >On Sun, 02 Jan 2005 22:33:08 +0100, Bram Moolenaar <Bram@...> wrote:
                    >>
                    >> Johnny Blaze wrote:
                    >>
                    >> > test11 and test30 still fail. I used "cvs co -kb vim7/src/testdir"
                    >> > after removing testdir. -kb is supposed to use the same line endings
                    >> > as stored in CVS.
                    >>
                    >> test11 fails if gzip is not available. Perhaps that's the problem you
                    >> are encountering?
                    >>
                    >> It appears the test[11|30].[in|ok] files in CVS are identical to what I
                    >> have. Another cause for problems is a diff program that can't handle
                    >> the different line endings.
                    >
                    >Bram,
                    >
                    >The problem with test11 appears to be the gnuwin32 port of sed. This
                    >version of sed operates in text mode by default, which changes
                    >line-endings to the native system (only if sed changes something, if
                    >you run a cat-like sed script, it appears to put out what you put in).
                    > If you run it in binary mode, it leaves line-endings alone.
                    >
                    >I changed the sed command in test11.in to sed -B s/e/E ... and it works fine.

                    -B is not a standard flag in sed which only operates on text files.

                    I download the UNIX files to an MS system. I have to convert line
                    endings for tests. I do this with the following in a .bat file:

                    tar c testdir | gzip -c > testdir.tar.gz
                    move testdir testdir.0 > nul
                    untar -cq testdir.tar.gz

                    :: vim.bat sets echo off
                    call vim.bat -eu NONE "+set backup backupext=.0 ff=dos" +wq Make_ivc.mak
                    @if not %makevim%.==. @echo on
                    call vim.bat -eu NONE "+set backup backupext=.0 ff=dos" +wq vim16.def
                    @if not %makevim%.==. @echo on
                    call vim.bat -eu NONE "+set backup backupext=.0 ff=dos" +wq vim.rc
                    @if not %makevim%.==. @echo on

                    (The echo manipulation code above is unnecessary. "vim ..." allows vim
                    to change reporting in the calling script; "call vim ..." isolates the
                    effect.)

                    As I found using vim to change line endings was painfully slow, I use
                    untar from ftp://ftp.cs.pdx.edu/pub/elvis/untar.c. - a 40k portable file

                    I don't have time now to get back up to speed on vim testing.

                    BTW Johnny, you did not reply to "Scenario? Numbers?" from me when you
                    asserted a change was an optimisation. A long time ago, I absorbed 3
                    optimisation rules which I paraphrase as: don't; don't yet; measure.
                    --
                    Walter Briscoe
                  • Bram Moolenaar
                    ... Ah, that explains the problems. The -B argument is not available elsewhere, thus we can t use that. You can try adding a command to remove the extra CR
                    Message 9 of 27 , Jan 4, 2005
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                      Johnny Blaze wrote:

                      > The problem with test11 appears to be the gnuwin32 port of sed. This
                      > version of sed operates in text mode by default, which changes
                      > line-endings to the native system (only if sed changes something, if
                      > you run a cat-like sed script, it appears to put out what you put in).
                      > If you run it in binary mode, it leaves line-endings alone.
                      >
                      > I changed the sed command in test11.in to sed -B s/e/E ... and it
                      > works fine.

                      Ah, that explains the problems. The -B argument is not available
                      elsewhere, thus we can't use that. You can try adding a command to
                      remove the extra CR characters:

                      *** testdir/test11.in~ Sun Jul 18 21:46:21 2004
                      --- testdir/test11.in Tue Jan 4 09:55:07 2005
                      ***************
                      *** 44,49 ****
                      --- 44,50 ----
                      :au FilterReadPost *.out '[,']s/x/X/g
                      :e! test.out " Edit the output file
                      :23,$!cat
                      + :23,$s/\r$// " remove CR for when sed adds them
                      :au! FileReadPre *.gz !gzip -d <afile>
                      :au FileReadPre *.gz call rename(expand("<afile>:r"), expand("<afile>"))
                      :au! FileReadPost *.gz '[,']s/l/L/

                      > Again on test30, If I put the snapshot-zip version of test30.ok in the
                      > working directory and cvs update test30.ok it shows that it was
                      > locally modified. If I cvs update -kb test30.ok (-kb is supposed to
                      > use the same line-endings as stored in the repos.) it still shows
                      > modified. Vim sees test30.ok as ff=unix, so fixff will cause test30
                      > to fail if you put the snapshot version in.

                      I don't understand this. It works fine for me, thus the version of
                      test30.ok in the snapshot should be OK. Note that it is in unix format,
                      thus fixff must change it to dos format. If you compare the files after
                      that they will differ.

                      I just checked again that the current files (snapshot 29) work fine for
                      me. That is using Make_mvc.mak.

                      --
                      hundred-and-one symptoms of being an internet addict:
                      218. Your spouse hands you a gift wrapped magnet with your PC's name
                      on it and you accuse him or her of genocide.

                      /// Bram Moolenaar -- Bram@... -- http://www.Moolenaar.net \\\
                      /// Sponsor Vim, vote for features -- http://www.Vim.org/sponsor/ \\\
                      \\\ Project leader for A-A-P -- http://www.A-A-P.org ///
                      \\\ Buy LOTR 3 and help AIDS victims -- http://ICCF.nl/lotr.html ///
                    • Johnny Blaze
                      ... This works excellently. ... I found something that does work. (I have attached a patch for src/testdir/Make_dos.mak. Basically duplicate fixff s only
                      Message 10 of 27 , Jan 4, 2005
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                        On Tue, 04 Jan 2005 11:18:31 +0100, Bram Moolenaar <Bram@...> wrote:
                        >
                        > Johnny Blaze wrote:
                        >
                        > > The problem with test11 appears to be the gnuwin32 port of sed. This
                        > > version of sed operates in text mode by default, which changes
                        > > line-endings to the native system (only if sed changes something, if
                        > > you run a cat-like sed script, it appears to put out what you put in).
                        > > If you run it in binary mode, it leaves line-endings alone.
                        > >
                        > > I changed the sed command in test11.in to sed -B s/e/E ... and it
                        > > works fine.
                        >
                        > Ah, that explains the problems. The -B argument is not available
                        > elsewhere, thus we can't use that. You can try adding a command to
                        > remove the extra CR characters:
                        >
                        > *** testdir/test11.in~ Sun Jul 18 21:46:21 2004
                        > --- testdir/test11.in Tue Jan 4 09:55:07 2005
                        > ***************
                        > *** 44,49 ****
                        > --- 44,50 ----
                        > :au FilterReadPost *.out '[,']s/x/X/g
                        > :e! test.out " Edit the output file
                        > :23,$!cat
                        > + :23,$s/\r$// " remove CR for when sed adds them
                        > :au! FileReadPre *.gz !gzip -d <afile>
                        > :au FileReadPre *.gz call rename(expand("<afile>:r"), expand("<afile>"))
                        > :au! FileReadPost *.gz '[,']s/l/L/

                        This works excellently.

                        > I don't understand this. It works fine for me, thus the version of
                        > test30.ok in the snapshot should be OK. Note that it is in unix format,
                        > thus fixff must change it to dos format. If you compare the files after
                        > that they will differ.
                        >
                        > I just checked again that the current files (snapshot 29) work fine for
                        > me. That is using Make_mvc.mak.

                        I found something that does work. (I have attached a patch for
                        src/testdir/Make_dos.mak. Basically duplicate fixff's only action and
                        change ff=dos to ff=unix and make it only for test30.ok.

                        @@ -46,6 +45,7 @@

                        fixff:
                        -$(VIMPROG) -u dos.vim --noplugin "+argdo set ff=dos|upd" +q *.in *.ok
                        + -$(VIMPROG) -u dos.vim --noplugin "+argdo set ff=unix|upd" +q test30.ok

                        -------------

                        That seems to work everytime even after deleting the file (test30.ok)
                        and pulling another from CVS.

                        Its kinda kludgy, but it works.

                        --

                        . o O pyromancer O o .
                      • Bram Moolenaar
                        ... I don t like this solution, because it makes an exception for one file. It does point in the right direction: Apparently it worked for me because my diff
                        Message 11 of 27 , Jan 4, 2005
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                          Johnny Blaze wrote:

                          > > I don't understand this. It works fine for me, thus the version of
                          > > test30.ok in the snapshot should be OK. Note that it is in unix
                          > > format, thus fixff must change it to dos format. If you compare the
                          > > files after that they will differ.
                          > >
                          > > I just checked again that the current files (snapshot 29) work fine for
                          > > me. That is using Make_mvc.mak.
                          >
                          > I found something that does work. (I have attached a patch for
                          > src/testdir/Make_dos.mak. Basically duplicate fixff's only action and
                          > change ff=dos to ff=unix and make it only for test30.ok.

                          I don't like this solution, because it makes an exception for one file.
                          It does point in the right direction: Apparently it worked for me
                          because my "diff" ignored differences in dos/unix file formats.
                          test30.ok would be dos and test30.out will be unix format.

                          For DOS I prefer all file formats to be dos (after fixff), so that there
                          are no exceptions.

                          Besides this, using the "cat" command will break the test for people
                          that don't have it. I'll change the test to avoid it. Makes it
                          portable and faster too.

                          --
                          hundred-and-one symptoms of being an internet addict:
                          225. You sign up for free subscriptions for all the computer magazines

                          /// Bram Moolenaar -- Bram@... -- http://www.Moolenaar.net \\\
                          /// Sponsor Vim, vote for features -- http://www.Vim.org/sponsor/ \\\
                          \\\ Project leader for A-A-P -- http://www.A-A-P.org ///
                          \\\ Buy LOTR 3 and help AIDS victims -- http://ICCF.nl/lotr.html ///
                        • Johnny Blaze
                          ... Thanks Bram. -- . o O pyromancer O o .
                          Message 12 of 27 , Jan 4, 2005
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                            On Tue, 04 Jan 2005 16:07:50 +0100, Bram Moolenaar <Bram@...> wrote:
                            > For DOS I prefer all file formats to be dos (after fixff), so that there
                            > are no exceptions.
                            >
                            > Besides this, using the "cat" command will break the test for people
                            > that don't have it. I'll change the test to avoid it. Makes it
                            > portable and faster too.

                            Thanks Bram.

                            --

                            . o O pyromancer O o .
                          • Johnny Blaze
                            On Tue, 4 Jan 2005 08:01:21 +0000, Walter Briscoe ... Bram s got it fixed without using the -B switch. So now, its nice and portable. ... I ve been looking for
                            Message 13 of 27 , Jan 5, 2005
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                              On Tue, 4 Jan 2005 08:01:21 +0000, Walter Briscoe
                              <wbriscoe@...> wrote:
                              > -B is not a standard flag in sed which only operates on text files.
                              >
                              > I download the UNIX files to an MS system. I have to convert line
                              > endings for tests. I do this with the following in a .bat file:
                              > [snip]

                              Bram's got it fixed without using the -B switch. So now, its nice and portable.

                              > BTW Johnny, you did not reply to "Scenario? Numbers?" from me when you
                              > asserted a change was an optimisation. A long time ago, I absorbed 3
                              > optimisation rules which I paraphrase as: don't; don't yet; measure.

                              I've been looking for an MS equivalent of time on linux. I was going
                              to time vim as it went through the tests... it should give a profile
                              of vim doing alot of different things. then some simple load times.

                              The data that I have now... It "pops" faster (loads) on both a 1.8GHz
                              P4 and a 3.0GHz than it does with CPUNR=i686. It takes longer to
                              compile, and it runs the tests faster. As you can see I have no hard
                              numbers as of yet.


                              --

                              . o O pyromancer O o .
                            • Walter Briscoe
                              In message of Wed, 5 Jan 2005 18:36:52 in , Johnny Blaze writes ... Good! ... Look for
                              Message 14 of 27 , Jan 6, 2005
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                                In message <804f592d050105043637e68b22@...> of Wed, 5 Jan
                                2005 18:36:52 in , Johnny Blaze <pyromancer@...> writes
                                >On Tue, 4 Jan 2005 08:01:21 +0000, Walter Briscoe
                                ><wbriscoe@...> wrote:
                                >> -B is not a standard flag in sed which only operates on text files.
                                >>
                                >> I download the UNIX files to an MS system. I have to convert line
                                >> endings for tests. I do this with the following in a .bat file:
                                >> [snip]
                                >
                                >Bram's got it fixed without using the -B switch. So now, its nice and portable.
                                Good!

                                >
                                >> BTW Johnny, you did not reply to "Scenario? Numbers?" from me when you
                                >> asserted a change was an optimisation. A long time ago, I absorbed 3
                                >> optimisation rules which I paraphrase as: don't; don't yet; measure.
                                >
                                >I've been looking for an MS equivalent of time on linux. I was going
                                >to time vim as it went through the tests... it should give a profile
                                >of vim doing alot of different things. then some simple load times.
                                Look for timethis.exe which is a crude MS elapsed time measurer. If you
                                can't find it, I will send you a copy. Time comparison is REALLY hard
                                due to caching. On UNIX (AIX), I never found satisfactory way to flush
                                cache. I wrote a small MS program to time repeated runs of a given
                                program. It measures mean and standard deviation of execution times. You
                                then need standard difference of means techniques to estimate
                                probability of chance giving observed results. I attach source. Real
                                gonad crusher is that execution times are not normally distributed and I
                                have no theory to compare anything else. It is easy where something
                                takes one hour rather than six. It is really hard when it takes 59
                                minutes rather than 60. I think you should probably reboot your machine
                                before making each measurement to have any chance of repeatable results.
                                You then have a problem that your repeatable results may not be typical.

                                >
                                >The data that I have now... It "pops" faster (loads) on both a 1.8GHz
                                >P4 and a 3.0GHz than it does with CPUNR=i686. It takes longer to
                                >compile, and it runs the tests faster. As you can see I have no hard
                                >numbers as of yet.

                                With rare exceptions, such as searching multi-megabyte files or running
                                it once for each file in a directory, I find vim is fast enough.
                                The former case can be sped by avoiding expensive things like
                                'incsearch'; the latter by running vim once for all files in a directory
                                if one has enough effort to improve the algorithm. That effort is not
                                usually available.
                              • Antoine J. Mechelynck
                                Bram Moolenaar wrote: [...] ... Dos has equivalents of the cat command for the most common cases, as follows: Copy to stdout: Unix: cat foo.bar Dos: type
                                Message 15 of 27 , Jan 7, 2005
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                                  Bram Moolenaar wrote:
                                  [...]
                                  > Besides this, using the "cat" command will break the test for people
                                  > that don't have it. I'll change the test to avoid it. Makes it
                                  > portable and faster too.
                                  >

                                  Dos has equivalents of the "cat" command for the most common cases, as
                                  follows:

                                  Copy to stdout:
                                  Unix: cat foo.bar
                                  Dos: type foo.bar

                                  Append:
                                  Unix: cat foo.txt >> bar.txt
                                  Dos: type foo.txt >> bar.txt

                                  Concatenate:
                                  Unix: cat file1 file2 file3 > file4
                                  Dos: copy /B file1+file2+file3 file4

                                  (the /B is optional, it forces "binary" or "raw" mode. /A would mean
                                  "ASCII" or "cooked" mode instead, including stop on Ctrl-Z and add
                                  Ctrl-Z at EOF if not present. The default depends on the file type
                                  [extension or device name].)

                                  Just FYI (my 0,02€).
                                  Best regards,
                                  Tony.
                                • Antoine J. Mechelynck
                                  Johnny Blaze wrote: [...] ... [...] I m not sure what time on Linux does but Dos has date and time commands: DATE [new date] TIME [new time] Arguments (if
                                  Message 16 of 27 , Jan 7, 2005
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                                    Johnny Blaze wrote:
                                    [...]
                                    > I've been looking for an MS equivalent of time on linux. I was going
                                    > to time vim as it went through the tests... it should give a profile
                                    > of vim doing alot of different things. then some simple load times.
                                    [...]

                                    I'm not sure what time on Linux does but Dos has "date" and "time" commands:

                                    DATE [new date]

                                    TIME [new time]

                                    Arguments (if present) are locale-dependent. If called without an
                                    argument, each of these commands displays the current value then asks
                                    for a new setting. (The prompt for DATE tells you which format is
                                    expected.) A workaround (to display the date/time without changing it)
                                    would be

                                    DATE < nul
                                    TIME < nul

                                    but of course they still display the prompts, which may in this case be
                                    regarded as interspersed garbage. This may or may not suit you.

                                    In CMD.EXE only (not in COMMAND.COM), and only when command extensions
                                    are enabled, you can also use

                                    DATE /T
                                    TIME /T

                                    to display the current values with no prompting. On my system,
                                    "time<nul" displays the time to the last tenth of a second, but "time/t"
                                    only gives it to the minute, which might not be precise enough for you.

                                    Note: IIRC (and if ECHO ON displays the %PROMPT% -- I haven't tested it
                                    recently in batch), you can also achieve timestamping of all commands in
                                    a batch script with

                                    ECHO ON
                                    PROMPT $D^I$T$_$P$G

                                    instead of the more usual "@ECHO OFF" at the start. ^I is an actual hard
                                    tab (or spaces if you like that better). This gives a timestamp (to the
                                    tenth of a second in COMMAND.COM or CMD.EXE) immediately above each
                                    executed command. Or remove the $_$P and you get the timestamp (instead
                                    of the current drive and directory) left of the > prompt.

                                    HTH,
                                    Tony.
                                  • Johnny Blaze
                                    I compiled two different versions. The only difference is CPUNR=i686 and CPUNR=P4. These are from the vim7 module in CVS current as of 10:00PM CST
                                    Message 17 of 27 , Jan 7, 2005
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                                      I compiled two different versions. The only difference is CPUNR=i686
                                      and CPUNR=P4. These are from the vim7 module in CVS current as of
                                      10:00PM CST 1/6/2004.

                                      I ran two test runs for the cli and the gui

                                      Test1: run the test suite
                                      Test2: load vim and quit immediately ((g)vim +q) in the build
                                      directory, which should mean minimal options/plugins etc.

                                      Note: the gui tests are a little skewed (they should be shorter)
                                      since when the gui runs the tests, vimrun pops a window that you have
                                      to press enter before it returns control. I practiced a few times and
                                      think that the skew is minimal.

                                      Test System: P4 2.6GHz, 1GB Ram (DDR200), UDMA hard drive, WinXPSP2

                                      Results:

                                      Test1:
                                      --------
                                      (i686, cli) = 1:08.750
                                      (P4, cli) = 1:07.562
                                      ========
                                      difference: P4 1.188 seconds faster

                                      (i686, gui) = 1:17.985
                                      (P4, gui) = 1:16.203
                                      ========
                                      difference: P4 1.782 seconds faster

                                      Test2:
                                      --------
                                      (i686, cli) = 0.360
                                      (P4, cli) = 0.344
                                      =========
                                      difference: P4 0.016 seconds faster

                                      (i686, gui) = 0.531
                                      (P4, gui) = 0.484
                                      =========
                                      difference: P4 0.047 seconds faster

                                      I've noticed that several people were sceptical about any performance
                                      gain. I realize that these gains are quite small, but they are
                                      performance gains. Seeing as how there were no actual code changes
                                      needed to get this performance increase, only a different compiler
                                      option, I don't know why anyone would protest the option being
                                      available.


                                      On Thu, 6 Jan 2005 09:38:06 +0000, Walter Briscoe
                                      <wbriscoe@...> wrote:
                                      > In message <804f592d050105043637e68b22@...> of Wed, 5 Jan
                                      > 2005 18:36:52 in , Johnny Blaze <pyromancer@...> writes
                                      > >On Tue, 4 Jan 2005 08:01:21 +0000, Walter Briscoe
                                      > ><wbriscoe@...> wrote:
                                      > >> -B is not a standard flag in sed which only operates on text files.
                                      > >>
                                      > >> I download the UNIX files to an MS system. I have to convert line
                                      > >> endings for tests. I do this with the following in a .bat file:
                                      > >> [snip]
                                      > >
                                      > >Bram's got it fixed without using the -B switch. So now, its nice and portable.
                                      > Good!
                                      >
                                      > >
                                      > >> BTW Johnny, you did not reply to "Scenario? Numbers?" from me when you
                                      > >> asserted a change was an optimisation. A long time ago, I absorbed 3
                                      > >> optimisation rules which I paraphrase as: don't; don't yet; measure.
                                      > >
                                      > >I've been looking for an MS equivalent of time on linux. I was going
                                      > >to time vim as it went through the tests... it should give a profile
                                      > >of vim doing alot of different things. then some simple load times.
                                      > Look for timethis.exe which is a crude MS elapsed time measurer. If you
                                      > can't find it, I will send you a copy. Time comparison is REALLY hard
                                      > due to caching. On UNIX (AIX), I never found satisfactory way to flush
                                      > cache. I wrote a small MS program to time repeated runs of a given
                                      > program. It measures mean and standard deviation of execution times. You
                                      > then need standard difference of means techniques to estimate
                                      > probability of chance giving observed results. I attach source. Real
                                      > gonad crusher is that execution times are not normally distributed and I
                                      > have no theory to compare anything else. It is easy where something
                                      > takes one hour rather than six. It is really hard when it takes 59
                                      > minutes rather than 60. I think you should probably reboot your machine
                                      > before making each measurement to have any chance of repeatable results.
                                      > You then have a problem that your repeatable results may not be typical.
                                      >
                                      > >
                                      > >The data that I have now... It "pops" faster (loads) on both a 1.8GHz
                                      > >P4 and a 3.0GHz than it does with CPUNR=i686. It takes longer to
                                      > >compile, and it runs the tests faster. As you can see I have no hard
                                      > >numbers as of yet.
                                      >
                                      > With rare exceptions, such as searching multi-megabyte files or running
                                      > it once for each file in a directory, I find vim is fast enough.
                                      > The former case can be sped by avoiding expensive things like
                                      > 'incsearch'; the latter by running vim once for all files in a directory
                                      > if one has enough effort to improve the algorithm. That effort is not
                                      > usually available.
                                      >
                                      >
                                      > --
                                      > Walter Briscoe
                                      >
                                      >
                                      >
                                      >


                                      --

                                      . o O pyromancer O o .
                                    • Dan Sharp
                                      ... Sorry for not thinking of this earlier, but would you care to change the P4 option value to pentium4 instead? This would make it consistent with the gcc
                                      Message 18 of 27 , Jan 7, 2005
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                                        Johnny Blaze wrote:
                                        > On Sat, 01 Jan 2005 14:23:06 +0100, Bram Moolenaar <Bram@...> wrote:
                                        >
                                        >>>I have attached a patch to Make_mvc.mak. It adds another CPUNR option
                                        >>>and removes some debug options from CFLAGS, PDB, and LINK_PDB.
                                        >>>
                                        >>>CPUNR: Adds "P4" to the list. It uses the options /G7 and /arch:SSE2.
                                        >>> This causes CL to optimize the code specifically for P4 and AMD
                                        >>>processors that implement SSE2 instructions. /arch:SSE2 is a new
                                        >>>option as of VC7.0.
                                        >>
                                        >>Looks OK. P4 also needs to be added to the comments at line 58.
                                        >
                                        >
                                        > got it.

                                        Sorry for not thinking of this earlier, but would you care to change the
                                        P4 option value to pentium4 instead? This would make it consistent with
                                        the gcc values for ARCH (and formerly CPUNR) in Make_cyg.mak and
                                        Make_ming.mak, which include values like i386, i486, i586, i686,
                                        pentium, pentium-mmx, pentiumpro, pentium2, pentium3, pentium4,
                                        prescott, nocona, k6, k6-2, k6-3, athlon, athlon-tbird, athlon-4,
                                        athlon-xp, athlon-mp, winchip-c6, winchip2 and c3 [from the gcc 3.3.3
                                        man page]. I don't know if the msvc compiler supports all these
                                        targets, but for those it does I think it would be a good idea to use a
                                        matching name.

                                        Also, in earlier messages it was decided to remove the CPUNR option from
                                        Make_cyg.mak and Make_ming.mak in favor of ARCH. I was wondering if
                                        the ARCH option could be renamed CPUNR as well. It would still do
                                        everything that ARCH currently does, and everything the previous CPUNR
                                        option did would still be removed. Alternatively, the CPUNR option in
                                        Make_mvc.mak and Make_bc5.mak could be renamed ARCH.

                                        The main reason for the above two suggestions is consistency. The four
                                        win32 makefiles (Make_bc5.mak, Make_cyg.mak, Make_ming.mak, and
                                        Make_mvc.mak) should have as much in common as possible so that you can
                                        use the same compile options for each one. The above two changes would
                                        let CPUNR=pentium4 work in all four makefiles (in Make_bc5.mak it would
                                        be unrecognized and simply get converted to i386).

                                        Dan Sharp
                                      • Bram Moolenaar
                                        ... Does MSVC understand pentium4 ? Then we can change P4 to pentium4. ... For things that are CPU numbers we should use CPUNR. ARCH sounds more like
                                        Message 19 of 27 , Jan 8, 2005
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                                          Dan Sharp wrote:

                                          > >>Looks OK. P4 also needs to be added to the comments at line 58.
                                          >
                                          > Sorry for not thinking of this earlier, but would you care to change the
                                          > P4 option value to pentium4 instead? This would make it consistent with
                                          > the gcc values for ARCH (and formerly CPUNR) in Make_cyg.mak and
                                          > Make_ming.mak, which include values like i386, i486, i586, i686,
                                          > pentium, pentium-mmx, pentiumpro, pentium2, pentium3, pentium4,
                                          > prescott, nocona, k6, k6-2, k6-3, athlon, athlon-tbird, athlon-4,
                                          > athlon-xp, athlon-mp, winchip-c6, winchip2 and c3 [from the gcc 3.3.3
                                          > man page]. I don't know if the msvc compiler supports all these
                                          > targets, but for those it does I think it would be a good idea to use a
                                          > matching name.

                                          Does MSVC understand "pentium4"? Then we can change P4 to pentium4.

                                          > Also, in earlier messages it was decided to remove the CPUNR option from
                                          > Make_cyg.mak and Make_ming.mak in favor of ARCH. I was wondering if
                                          > the ARCH option could be renamed CPUNR as well. It would still do
                                          > everything that ARCH currently does, and everything the previous CPUNR
                                          > option did would still be removed. Alternatively, the CPUNR option in
                                          > Make_mvc.mak and Make_bc5.mak could be renamed ARCH.

                                          For things that are CPU numbers we should use CPUNR. ARCH sounds more
                                          like "architecture", which could mean many things.

                                          > The main reason for the above two suggestions is consistency. The four
                                          > win32 makefiles (Make_bc5.mak, Make_cyg.mak, Make_ming.mak, and
                                          > Make_mvc.mak) should have as much in common as possible so that you can
                                          > use the same compile options for each one. The above two changes would
                                          > let CPUNR=pentium4 work in all four makefiles (in Make_bc5.mak it would
                                          > be unrecognized and simply get converted to i386).

                                          That's good. For Vim 7 we can make changes like this.

                                          --
                                          GOD: That is your purpose Arthur ... the Quest for the Holy Grail ...
                                          "Monty Python and the Holy Grail" PYTHON (MONTY) PICTURES LTD

                                          /// Bram Moolenaar -- Bram@... -- http://www.Moolenaar.net \\\
                                          /// Sponsor Vim, vote for features -- http://www.Vim.org/sponsor/ \\\
                                          \\\ Project leader for A-A-P -- http://www.A-A-P.org ///
                                          \\\ Buy LOTR 3 and help AIDS victims -- http://ICCF.nl/lotr.html ///
                                        • Dan Sharp
                                          ... Not directly, but that doesn t matter. Make_mvc.mak just looks at the value of CPUNR and converts it to the appropriate /Gx option, so it really shouldn t
                                          Message 20 of 27 , Jan 8, 2005
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                                            Bram Moolenaar wrote:

                                            > Dan Sharp wrote:
                                            >
                                            >>>> Looks OK. P4 also needs to be added to the comments at line 58.
                                            >>
                                            >>
                                            >> Sorry for not thinking of this earlier, but would you care to change
                                            >> the P4 option value to pentium4 instead? This would make it
                                            >> consistent with the gcc values for ARCH (and formerly CPUNR) in
                                            >> Make_cyg.mak and Make_ming.mak, which include values like i386, i486,
                                            >> i586, i686, pentium, pentium-mmx, pentiumpro, pentium2, pentium3,
                                            >> pentium4, prescott, nocona, k6, k6-2, k6-3, athlon, athlon-tbird,
                                            >> athlon-4, athlon-xp, athlon-mp, winchip-c6, winchip2 and c3 [from the
                                            >> gcc 3.3.3 man page]. I don't know if the msvc compiler supports all
                                            >> these targets, but for those it does I think it would be a good idea
                                            >> to use a matching name.
                                            >
                                            > Does MSVC understand "pentium4"? Then we can change P4 to pentium4.

                                            Not directly, but that doesn't matter. Make_mvc.mak just looks at the
                                            value of CPUNR and converts it to the appropriate /Gx option, so it
                                            really shouldn't matter which label is used to assign the value.
                                            Make_cyg.mak and Make_ming.mak are the ones that use the value directly
                                            (-march=$CPUNR) so those must use use correct value, like pentium4.

                                            >> Also, in earlier messages it was decided to remove the CPUNR option
                                            >> from Make_cyg.mak and Make_ming.mak in favor of ARCH. I was
                                            >> wondering if the ARCH option could be renamed CPUNR as well. It
                                            >> would still do everything that ARCH currently does, and everything
                                            >> the previous CPUNR option did would still be removed. Alternatively,
                                            >> the CPUNR option in Make_mvc.mak and Make_bc5.mak could be renamed
                                            >> ARCH.
                                            >
                                            > For things that are CPU numbers we should use CPUNR. ARCH sounds more
                                            > like "architecture", which could mean many things.

                                            Sounds good. The ARCH option does mean architecture, because that is
                                            what is getting set by it (the -march compile flag) for gcc. The CPUNR
                                            option was used to set the -mcpu compile flag for gcc. MSVC and BCC55
                                            only have one option to set, but I am not sure if it corresponds more to
                                            the -march or the -mcpu option. Using CPUNR for all of them would
                                            probably be the safest bet.

                                            Dan Sharp
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