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49289Re: VIM and NTFS streams

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  • Bram Moolenaar
    Feb 6, 2008
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      Alex Jakushev wrote:

      > On 1/31/08, Bram Moolenaar <Bram@...> wrote:
      > >
      > > Try setting the 'backupcopy' option to "yes".
      >
      > This worked, but then it raises another question. Previous value
      > of the 'backupcopy' option was auto, which means yes or no, which
      > works best. Why didn't it choose yes, if no fails?

      Vim doesn't detect the situation that you are editing an info stream
      directly.

      > Also, in my configuration, backup option is no. Theoretically, I should
      > not bother with all this stuff at all? I use Vim7.1 last official release.

      The 'writebackup' option matters too.

      > > I thought Vim did copy the streams, but I suppose this doesn't work when
      > > you edit one specific stream. If you want to look at it: function
      > > copy_infostreams() in src/os_win32.c
      >
      > This may take a while for me to set up everything...
      >
      > But i have an idea that the problem is with file names.
      > When you open some specific stream, vim considers the stream name as
      > filename, and filename as subfolder. The stream name is separated from file
      > name with a colon (c:\path\foo.txt:bar), and the same colon is used to
      > separate drive letter. Maybe this causes some confusion?

      Detecting the colon should be simple. When not using NTFS the file name
      would be illegal. I'll add a todo item for this. But it would be nice
      if someone can make a patch for it.

      > Also, VIM converts dots in file name to underscores sometimes, when
      > streams are specified.

      I haven't seen this. Perhaps it's because the long file name is
      converted to a 8.3 file name? Can you give a reproducable example?

      > > NTFS streams are mostly restricted to MS-Windows applications, and
      > > rarely used. I don't think it's a good idea to support them in Vim
      > > directly.
      >
      > I understand it, but vim has specific windows functionality anyway.
      > But of course it is easy for me to suggest this and that :)

      I always put more effort in functionality that works everywhere. And to
      keep programs portable rare features should be avoided, especially when
      they don't add something essential for the end user. MS thinks
      otherwise: They want programs to only run on MS-Windows. Portability
      means they might lose customers. Some Linux developers also go in this
      direction, they don't care about MS-Windows users. I care for everybody
      :-).

      --
      The process for understanding customers primarily involves sitting around with
      other marketing people and talking about what you would to if you were dumb
      enough to be a customer.
      (Scott Adams - The Dilbert principle)

      /// Bram Moolenaar -- Bram@... -- http://www.Moolenaar.net \\\
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      \\\ download, build and distribute -- http://www.A-A-P.org ///
      \\\ help me help AIDS victims -- http://ICCF-Holland.org ///

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