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Re: Go to start of visual selection

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  • Bill McCarthy
    ... Why do you use ` instead of just `
    Message 1 of 14 , Feb 1, 2007
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      On Thu 1-Feb-07 11:51am -0600, Tim Chase wrote:

      > vnoremap gt <esc>`>:exec 'norm '.visualmode().'`<lt>'<cr>
      > vnoremap gb <esc>`<lt>:exec 'norm '.visualmode().'`>'<cr>

      Why do you use `<lt> instead of just `< ? Just a matter of
      preference?

      --
      Best regards,
      Bill
    • Tim Chase
      ... Depending on what follows the `
      Message 2 of 14 , Feb 1, 2007
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        >> vnoremap gt <esc>`>:exec 'norm '.visualmode().'`<lt>'<cr>
        >> vnoremap gb <esc>`<lt>:exec 'norm '.visualmode().'`>'<cr>
        >
        > Why do you use `<lt> instead of just `< ? Just a matter of
        > preference?

        Depending on what follows the

        `<

        vim may try to interpret it as a character-notation. I prefer
        not to have to think about it, so just like with HTML entities
        when I write HTML, it's now hard-wired that, when writing
        mappings, I use <lt> (and I get stung enough with "|" vs. "<bar>"
        that I tend to err on the side of using the <> notation when I
        don't have to, just so I don't have to burn brain-cells thinking
        about it case-by-case.

        -tim
      • Yegappan Lakshmanan
        Hi Bill, ... The following text describing when to use in a map is taken from the Vim keymap tutorial which is available at:
        Message 3 of 14 , Feb 1, 2007
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          Hi Bill,

          On 2/1/07, Bill McCarthy <WJMc@...> wrote:
          > On Thu 1-Feb-07 11:51am -0600, Tim Chase wrote:
          >
          > > vnoremap gt <esc>`>:exec 'norm '.visualmode().'`<lt>'<cr>
          > > vnoremap gb <esc>`<lt>:exec 'norm '.visualmode().'`>'<cr>
          >
          > Why do you use `<lt> instead of just `< ? Just a matter of
          > preference?
          >

          The following text describing when to use <lt> in a map is taken
          from the Vim keymap tutorial which is available at:

          http://www.geocities.com/yegappan/vim_keymap.html

          ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
          When Vim parses a string in a map command, the \<...> sequence of characters is
          replaced by the corresponding control character. For example, let us
          say in insert
          mode you want the down arrow key to execute <C-N> when the insert complete
          popup menu is displayed. Otherwise, you want the down arrow key to move the
          cursor one line down. You can try the following command (which doesn't work):

          :inoremap <Down> <C-R>=pumvisible() ? "\<C-N>" : "\<Down>"<CR>

          When parsing the above command, Vim replaces <C-N> and <Down> with the
          corresponding control characters. When you press the down arrow in insert
          mode, as there are control characters in the expression now, the
          command will fail.

          To fix this, you should escape the "<" character, so that Vim will not
          replace "\<C-N>" with the control character when parsing the command. The
          following command works:

          :inoremap <Down> <C-R>=pumvisible() ? "\<lt>C-N>" : "\<lt>Down>"<CR>

          With the above command, Vim will use the control character only when the map
          is invoked and not when the above command is parsed.
          ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


          ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
          If the flag 'B' is present in 'cpoptions', then the backslash
          character is not treated
          as a special character in map commands. For example, let us say you want to
          create an insert-mode map for the <F6> key to insert the text "Press <Home> to
          go to first character". For this, you can try using the following command:

          imap <F6> Press <Home> to go to first character

          When you press <F6> in the insert mode, the <Home> in the above map will
          cause Vim to move the cursor to the first character in the line and insert the
          reminder of the text there. To literally enter the text "<Home>", you need
          to escape it:

          imap <F6> Press \<Home> to go to first character

          If the flag 'B' is not present in 'cpoptions', then the above map command will
          insert the correct text. If the flag 'B' is present, then the
          backslash character is
          not treated as a special character and the above map will not insert
          the correct
          text. To treat <Home> literally independent of the 'cpoptions' setting, you can
          use the following command:

          imap <F6> Press <lt>Home> to go to first character

          In the above command, the notation <lt> is used for "<" in "<Home>".
          ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

          - Yegappan
        • Andy Wokula
          ... I don t understand why this works. There must be a difference between ` v` markers. Why
          Message 4 of 14 , Feb 4, 2007
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            Tim Chase schrieb:
            >> How can I move the cursor the start of the visual selection?
            >> With the "o" command, yes. But how can I make sure the cursor
            >> is at the start while visual mode is on? The "`<" motion
            >> followed by "gv" sets the cursor back to the end if it was
            >> there.
            >
            > I think it sounds like you want something like the following:
            >
            > vnoremap gt <esc>`>:exec 'norm '.visualmode().'`<lt>'<cr>
            > vnoremap gb <esc>`<lt>:exec 'norm '.visualmode().'`>'<cr>
            >
            > which gives you a "Go to the Top" and "Go to the Bottom" mapping within
            > visual mode.
            >
            > It can be a little funky in blockwise visual-mode, if your '< and '>
            > points are top-right and bottom-left (rather than top-left and
            > bottom-right), as the "top" will go to the top-right, not the top-left.
            > I haven't figured out a good way to do this without considerably more
            > code in the mapping (save the column of '< and then "gvO" to go back to
            > visual-mode but in the other corner and then compare the columns to see
            > which you want, perhaps needing to switch back...it's ugly).
            >
            > However, it should work fine in character-wise and line-wise visual modes.
            >
            > HTH,
            >
            > -tim

            I don't understand why this works.

            There must be a difference between
            `>v`<
            and
            :normal `>v`<

            "v" defines a new visual area and overwrites the `<,`> markers. Why
            does "`<" after ":normal" move the cursor to the start of the
            _previously_ selected visual area?

            Thx,
            Andy

            --
            kühl, @... ist wieder zurück

            EOF






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          • Andy Wokula
            ... Works fine at least for character-wise visual mode, thanks! :-) IMHO, this little basic feature should be included in Vim. Regards, Andy -- EOF
            Message 5 of 14 , Feb 4, 2007
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              Tim Chase schrieb:
              >> How can I move the cursor the start of the visual selection?
              >> With the "o" command, yes. But how can I make sure the cursor
              >> is at the start while visual mode is on? The "`<" motion
              >> followed by "gv" sets the cursor back to the end if it was
              >> there.
              >
              > I think it sounds like you want something like the following:
              >
              > vnoremap gt <esc>`>:exec 'norm '.visualmode().'`<lt>'<cr>
              > vnoremap gb <esc>`<lt>:exec 'norm '.visualmode().'`>'<cr>
              >
              > which gives you a "Go to the Top" and "Go to the Bottom" mapping within
              > visual mode.
              >
              > It can be a little funky in blockwise visual-mode, if your '< and '>
              > points are top-right and bottom-left (rather than top-left and
              > bottom-right), as the "top" will go to the top-right, not the top-left.
              > I haven't figured out a good way to do this without considerably more
              > code in the mapping (save the column of '< and then "gvO" to go back to
              > visual-mode but in the other corner and then compare the columns to see
              > which you want, perhaps needing to switch back...it's ugly).
              >
              > However, it should work fine in character-wise and line-wise visual modes.
              >
              > HTH,
              >
              > -tim

              Works fine at least for character-wise visual mode, thanks! :-)
              IMHO, this little basic feature should be included in Vim.

              Regards,
              Andy

              --
              EOF




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            • Tim Chase
              ... Sorry it s taken me a while to get back on this...life got a little crazy. Buried away in the help just above ... and in the section ... one finds this
              Message 6 of 14 , Feb 6, 2007
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                >> vnoremap gt <esc>`>:exec 'norm '.visualmode().'`<lt>'<cr>
                >> vnoremap gb <esc>`<lt>:exec 'norm '.visualmode().'`>'<cr>
                >
                > I don't understand why this works.
                >
                > There must be a difference between
                > `>v`<
                > and
                > :normal `>v`<
                >
                > "v" defines a new visual area and overwrites the `<,`>
                > markers. Why does "`<" after ":normal" move the cursor to
                > the start of the _previously_ selected visual area?

                Sorry it's taken me a while to get back on this...life got a
                little crazy.

                Buried away in the help just above

                :help :map-verbose

                and in the section

                :help map-listing

                one finds this little morsel of help:

                Note: When using mappings for Visual mode, you can use
                the "'<" mark, which is the start of the last selected
                Visual area in the current buffer |'<|.

                It's also possible to read the help at

                :help '<

                either way, as it refers to the "last selected visual area"
                which in visual-mode could mean either "the area selected
                before the the one I'm currently in", or "the current visual
                selection which is now the 'last selected visual area'
                because I'm now doing something other than selecting". It
                might help to have an extra sentence at this help to say
                something like

                If you are currently in visual mode, this refers to the
                beginning/end of the *previous* visual selection

                Hope this helps shed light on your question rather than
                muddy the waters.

                -tim
              • Andy Wokula
                ... Thanks for the pointer! I couldn t find hints about this in the help. Interesting that mappings for Visual mode include commands given with :normal
                Message 7 of 14 , Feb 7, 2007
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                  Tim Chase schrieb:
                  > >> vnoremap gt <esc>`>:exec 'norm '.visualmode().'`<lt>'<cr>
                  > >> vnoremap gb <esc>`<lt>:exec 'norm '.visualmode().'`>'<cr>
                  > >
                  > > I don't understand why this works.
                  > >
                  > > There must be a difference between
                  > > `>v`<
                  > > and
                  > > :normal `>v`<
                  > >
                  > > "v" defines a new visual area and overwrites the `<,`>
                  > > markers. Why does "`<" after ":normal" move the cursor to
                  > > the start of the _previously_ selected visual area?
                  >
                  > Sorry it's taken me a while to get back on this...life got a
                  > little crazy.
                  >
                  > Buried away in the help just above
                  >
                  > :help :map-verbose
                  >
                  > and in the section
                  >
                  > :help map-listing
                  >
                  > one finds this little morsel of help:
                  >
                  > Note: When using mappings for Visual mode, you can use
                  > the "'<" mark, which is the start of the last selected
                  > Visual area in the current buffer |'<|.

                  Thanks for the pointer! I couldn't find hints about this in the help.

                  Interesting that "mappings for Visual mode" include commands given
                  with :normal (emphasize on "mappings").

                  > It's also possible to read the help at
                  >
                  > :help '<
                  >
                  > either way, as it refers to the "last selected visual area"
                  > which in visual-mode could mean either "the area selected
                  > before the the one I'm currently in", or "the current visual
                  > selection which is now the 'last selected visual area'
                  > because I'm now doing something other than selecting". It
                  > might help to have an extra sentence at this help to say
                  > something like
                  >
                  > If you are currently in visual mode, this refers to the
                  > beginning/end of the *previous* visual selection

                  This phrase would be more comprehensible, indeed.

                  > Hope this helps shed light on your question rather than
                  > muddy the waters.
                  >
                  > -tim

                  Most important: It turned out to be documented :-)

                  Regards,
                  Andy

                  --
                  EOF










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                • Andy Wokula
                  ... Ah, with a later Vim7 there is no difference any more. Obviously this has been fixed with patch 125, dated August 2006. Ok, this took three months till I
                  Message 8 of 14 , May 16, 2007
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                    Andy Wokula schrieb:
                    > Tim Chase schrieb:
                    >>> How can I move the cursor the start of the visual selection?
                    >>> With the "o" command, yes. But how can I make sure the cursor
                    >>> is at the start while visual mode is on? The "`<" motion
                    >>> followed by "gv" sets the cursor back to the end if it was
                    >>> there.
                    >>
                    >> I think it sounds like you want something like the following:
                    >>
                    >> vnoremap gt <esc>`>:exec 'norm '.visualmode().'`<lt>'<cr>
                    >> vnoremap gb <esc>`<lt>:exec 'norm '.visualmode().'`>'<cr>
                    >>
                    >> which gives you a "Go to the Top" and "Go to the Bottom" mapping
                    >> within visual mode.
                    >>
                    >> It can be a little funky in blockwise visual-mode, if your '< and '>
                    >> points are top-right and bottom-left (rather than top-left and
                    >> bottom-right), as the "top" will go to the top-right, not the
                    >> top-left. I haven't figured out a good way to do this without
                    >> considerably more code in the mapping (save the column of '< and then
                    >> "gvO" to go back to visual-mode but in the other corner and then
                    >> compare the columns to see which you want, perhaps needing to switch
                    >> back...it's ugly).
                    >>
                    >> However, it should work fine in character-wise and line-wise visual
                    >> modes.
                    >>
                    >> HTH,
                    >>
                    >> -tim
                    >
                    > I don't understand why this works.
                    >
                    > There must be a difference between
                    > `>v`<
                    > and
                    > :normal `>v`<
                    >
                    > "v" defines a new visual area and overwrites the `<,`> markers. Why
                    > does "`<" after ":normal" move the cursor to the start of the
                    > _previously_ selected visual area?
                    >
                    > Thx,
                    > Andy

                    Ah, with a later Vim7 there is no difference any more.
                    Obviously this has been fixed with patch 125, dated August 2006.
                    Ok, this took three months till I got it ...

                    --
                    Regards,
                    Andy
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