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put (paste) from windows clipboard into vim

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  • Evan H. Carmi
    hey all, i am wondering how to copy through windows and than paste into vim with a keyboard command. for example: i am running FF and i copy some text, when i
    Message 1 of 7 , May 31, 2006
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      hey all,

      i am wondering how to copy through windows and than paste into vim with
      a keyboard command.

      for example: i am running FF and i copy some text, when i go into vim I
      don't know how to put (paste) that text without right clicking and
      selecting paste. the

      :p

      command doesn't work and seems to be put what is in the vim clipboard (i
      don't think clipboard is the correct term for the place where vim has
      yanked data. what is it?)

      peace, Evan
    • A.J.Mechelynck
      ... In Vim, the system clipboard is known as register plus . On non-Unix versions, register star is synonymous with it. So, just prefix your P (put) command
      Message 2 of 7 , May 31, 2006
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        Evan H. Carmi wrote:
        > hey all,
        >
        > i am wondering how to copy through windows and than paste into vim with
        > a keyboard command.
        >
        > for example: i am running FF and i copy some text, when i go into vim I
        > don't know how to put (paste) that text without right clicking and
        > selecting paste. the
        >
        > :p
        >
        > command doesn't work and seems to be put what is in the vim clipboard (i
        > don't think clipboard is the correct term for the place where vim has
        > yanked data. what is it?)
        >
        > peace, Evan
        >
        >
        >
        In Vim, the system clipboard is known as "register plus". On non-Unix
        versions, "register star" is synonymous with it. So, just prefix your P
        (put) command with "+ (double-quote plus) or, on non-Unix systems, by "*
        (double-quote star) and voilĂ ! The clipboard contents get patsed.
        Conversely, "+y or "+d do a yank (copy) or delete (cut) to the clipboard:

        "+p paste before cursor
        "+P paste after cursor
        "+y copy (visual area, or takes a postfix telling Vim
        "what" to copy)
        "+d cut (visual area, or with a postfix)

        :echo @+ show the contents of the system clipboard _without_
        pasting

        etc.

        And BTW, it's p (put after cursor) or P (put before cursor), _without_ a
        colon prefix; or you can youse the :pu[t] command, which takes the
        register-name after the command, and accepts a line number:

        :put +

        pastes the clipboard after the current line, and

        :0put +

        pastes it at the top of the file (or use ":$put +", without the quotes,
        to paste at the bottom).

        And the correct name (in Vim lingo) for where Vim stores data between a
        yank and a put if you don't explicitly specify a register name, is --
        the unnamed register.

        See ":help change.txt", and, in particular, ":help registers".


        HTH,
        Tony.
      • Max Dyckhoff
        Prefixing the yank and put commands with registers works, but I personally prefer the following, which just sets the default register to be the system
        Message 3 of 7 , Jun 1, 2006
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          Prefixing the yank and put commands with registers works, but I personally prefer the following, which just sets the default register to be the system clipboard. From :help clipboard,

          When the "unnamed" string is included in the 'clipboard' option, the
          Unnamed register is the same as the "* register. Thus you can yank to
          and paste the selection without prepending "* to commands.

          So just put "set clipboard=unnamed" in your vimrc file, use y and p as normal, and watch them yank to and put from the system clipboard! Woo!

          Max




          > -----Original Message-----
          > From: A.J.Mechelynck [mailto:antoine.mechelynck@...]
          > Sent: Wednesday, May 31, 2006 7:44 PM
          > To: evan@...
          > Cc: vim@...
          > Subject: Re: put (paste) from windows clipboard into vim
          >
          > Evan H. Carmi wrote:
          > > hey all,
          > >
          > > i am wondering how to copy through windows and than paste into vim with
          > > a keyboard command.
          > >
          > > for example: i am running FF and i copy some text, when i go into vim I
          > > don't know how to put (paste) that text without right clicking and
          > > selecting paste. the
          > >
          > > :p
          > >
          > > command doesn't work and seems to be put what is in the vim clipboard (i
          > > don't think clipboard is the correct term for the place where vim has
          > > yanked data. what is it?)
          > >
          > > peace, Evan
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > In Vim, the system clipboard is known as "register plus". On non-Unix
          > versions, "register star" is synonymous with it. So, just prefix your P
          > (put) command with "+ (double-quote plus) or, on non-Unix systems, by "*
          > (double-quote star) and voilĂ ! The clipboard contents get patsed.
          > Conversely, "+y or "+d do a yank (copy) or delete (cut) to the clipboard:
          >
          > "+p paste before cursor
          > "+P paste after cursor
          > "+y copy (visual area, or takes a postfix telling Vim
          > "what" to copy)
          > "+d cut (visual area, or with a postfix)
          >
          > :echo @+ show the contents of the system clipboard _without_
          > pasting
          >
          > etc.
          >
          > And BTW, it's p (put after cursor) or P (put before cursor), _without_ a
          > colon prefix; or you can youse the :pu[t] command, which takes the
          > register-name after the command, and accepts a line number:
          >
          > :put +
          >
          > pastes the clipboard after the current line, and
          >
          > :0put +
          >
          > pastes it at the top of the file (or use ":$put +", without the quotes,
          > to paste at the bottom).
          >
          > And the correct name (in Vim lingo) for where Vim stores data between a
          > yank and a put if you don't explicitly specify a register name, is --
          > the unnamed register.
          >
          > See ":help change.txt", and, in particular, ":help registers".
          >
          >
          > HTH,
          > Tony.
        • Tim Chase
          ... This is nice when you want it, but I find it frequently annoying when I do anything that happens to delete in the process...like ciw to change the current
          Message 4 of 7 , Jun 1, 2006
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            > So just put "set clipboard=unnamed" in your vimrc file, use y
            > and p as normal, and watch them yank to and put from the
            > system clipboard! Woo!


            This is nice when you want it, but I find it frequently annoying
            when I do anything that happens to delete in the process...like

            ciw

            to change the current word under the cursor. It tromps over my
            system clipboard, replacing it with the word I've removed. I
            tend to like to keep things of importance in my system clipboard,
            and I'm all to prone to making edits in Vim that would tromp on
            my clipboard.

            At least Vim offers the option, unlike most other editors. :)

            So use it if you like, but be forewarned :)

            -tim
          • Max Dyckhoff
            That seems like a fair warning, although I will say that I have never run into such a problem. I don t tend to keep things in the clipboard for very long at
            Message 5 of 7 , Jun 1, 2006
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              That seems like a fair warning, although I will say that I have never
              run into such a problem. I don't tend to keep things in the clipboard
              for very long at all, normally just to move from one place to another.
              If I do want them to be around for a while then I generally want them to
              be around for A Long Time, and so I put them in a named buffer so that
              nothing can stomp on them.

              Choose whatever is better for your workflow, is the solution!

              Max

              > -----Original Message-----
              > From: Tim Chase [mailto:vim@...]
              > Sent: Thursday, June 01, 2006 8:47 AM
              > To: Max Dyckhoff
              > Cc: evan@...; vim@...
              > Subject: Re: put (paste) from windows clipboard into vim
              >
              > > So just put "set clipboard=unnamed" in your vimrc file, use y
              > > and p as normal, and watch them yank to and put from the
              > > system clipboard! Woo!
              >
              >
              > This is nice when you want it, but I find it frequently annoying
              > when I do anything that happens to delete in the process...like
              >
              > ciw
              >
              > to change the current word under the cursor. It tromps over my
              > system clipboard, replacing it with the word I've removed. I
              > tend to like to keep things of importance in my system clipboard,
              > and I'm all to prone to making edits in Vim that would tromp on
              > my clipboard.
              >
              > At least Vim offers the option, unlike most other editors. :)
              >
              > So use it if you like, but be forewarned :)
              >
              > -tim
              >
              >
            • Georg Dahn
              Hi! There is another possibility: Shift-Ins = paste Ctrl-Ins = copy Shift-Del = cut These shortcuts work even without sourcing mswin.vim (BTW, I don t
              Message 6 of 7 , Jun 1, 2006
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                Hi!

                There is another possibility:

                Shift-Ins = paste
                Ctrl-Ins = copy
                Shift-Del = cut

                These shortcuts work even without sourcing mswin.vim (BTW, I don't
                recommend sourcing mswin.vim) and have the advantage that they work in
                all Windows applications.

                Best wishes,
                Georg



                Evan H. Carmi wrote:
                > hey all,
                >
                > i am wondering how to copy through windows and than paste into vim with
                > a keyboard command.
                >
                > for example: i am running FF and i copy some text, when i go into vim I
                > don't know how to put (paste) that text without right clicking and
                > selecting paste. the
                >
                > :p
                >
                > command doesn't work and seems to be put what is in the vim clipboard (i
                > don't think clipboard is the correct term for the place where vim has
                > yanked data. what is it?)
                >
                > peace, Evan
                >


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              • A.J.Mechelynck
                ... [...] I knew about that but I somehow forgot to mention it (though maybe I should have), because most of my puts and yanks are internal to Vim and I don t
                Message 7 of 7 , Jun 1, 2006
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                  Max Dyckhoff wrote:
                  > Prefixing the yank and put commands with registers works, but I personally prefer the following, which just sets the default register to be the system clipboard. From :help clipboard,
                  >
                  > When the "unnamed" string is included in the 'clipboard' option, the
                  > Unnamed register is the same as the "* register. Thus you can yank to
                  > and paste the selection without prepending "* to commands.
                  >
                  > So just put "set clipboard=unnamed" in your vimrc file, use y and p as normal, and watch them yank to and put from the system clipboard! Woo!
                  >
                  > Max
                  >
                  >
                  [...]

                  I knew about that but I somehow forgot to mention it (though maybe I
                  should have), because most of my puts and yanks are internal to Vim and
                  I don't like clobbering the system clipboard in that case. "De gustibus
                  et coloribus non est disputandum."


                  Best regards,
                  Tony.
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