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RE: Easy On The Eyes

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  • jonah
    ... Robert, Thanks for the link... I almost like matrix... I just wish it used a few different shades of green rather than the block word highlighting....
    Message 1 of 30 , Aug 31 1:26 PM
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      > Check out this link, it is a bunch
      > of themes to get an idea
      > about what you like...
      >
      > http://www-2.cs.cmu.edu/~maverick/VimColorSc
      > hemeTest/index-perl.html

      Robert,

      Thanks for the link...

      I almost like matrix... I just wish it used a few
      different shades of green rather than the block word
      highlighting.... maybe I'll fiddle with it when I
      have some time.

      Brent Saunders also recommended murphy, which is
      pretty nice too.

      J
    • Dave Silvia
      Shades of green and blue are easier on the eye (tho I don t know about a black background, but something softer than stark white). That s why many moons ago
      Message 2 of 30 , Aug 31 1:57 PM
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        Shades of green and blue are easier on the eye (tho' I don't know about a
        black background, but something softer than stark white). That's why many
        moons ago blackboards were changed to green.
        -----Original Message-----
        From: jonah [mailto:jonahgoldstein@...]
        Sent: Tuesday, August 31, 2004 2:21 PM
        To: vim
        Subject: Easy On The Eyes

        Hi,

        Does anyone know which vim color scheme is supposed to
        be least stressful on the eyes?

        To some extent, this is a matter of taste, but I
        remember reading once about a study which claimed that
        green or amber text on a black background was supposed
        to be easiest for humans to look at for long periods.
        Does anyone know if this is true? If so, which vim
        color scheme would be best?

        Thanks,
        Jonah
      • Dave Silvia
        If you want to experiment easily, try the script InteractHL.vim (http://www.vim.org/scripts/script.php?script_id=1054). It allows you to pick colors by name
        Message 3 of 30 , Aug 31 2:33 PM
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          If you want to experiment easily, try the script InteractHL.vim
          (http://www.vim.org/scripts/script.php?script_id=1054). It allows you to
          pick colors by name for the different highlight groups and see the results
          immediately. You can then copy the resulting file to syntax/syncolor.vim in
          an 'after' directory.

          install details
          NOTE: REQUIRES vsutil_vim.zip


          HTH,
          Dave S.
          -----Original Message-----
          From: jonah [mailto:jonahgoldstein@...]
          Sent: Tuesday, August 31, 2004 2:21 PM
          To: vim
          Subject: Easy On The Eyes

          Hi,

          Does anyone know which vim color scheme is supposed to
          be least stressful on the eyes?

          To some extent, this is a matter of taste, but I
          remember reading once about a study which claimed that
          green or amber text on a black background was supposed
          to be easiest for humans to look at for long periods.
          Does anyone know if this is true? If so, which vim
          color scheme would be best?

          Thanks,
          Jonah
        • Dave Silvia
          Absolutely! ... From: Keith Roberts [mailto:kroberts@wpas-inc.com] Sent: Tuesday, August 31, 2004 5:29 PM To: Dave Silvia; jonah; vim Subject: RE: Easy On The
          Message 4 of 30 , Aug 31 3:27 PM
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            Absolutely!
            -----Original Message-----
            From: Keith Roberts [mailto:kroberts@...]
            Sent: Tuesday, August 31, 2004 5:29 PM
            To: Dave Silvia; jonah; vim
            Subject: RE: Easy On The Eyes

            >-----Original Message-----
            >From: Dave Silvia [mailto:dsilvia@...]
            >Sent: Tuesday, August 31, 2004 12:58 PM
            >To: jonah; vim
            >Subject: RE: Easy On The Eyes
            >
            >Shades of green and blue are easier on the eye (tho' I don't
            >know about a black background, but something softer than stark
            >white). That's why many moons ago blackboards were changed to
            >green.

            Perhaps, but there's a difference in eyestrain created by reflection
            from a solid surface like a black/greenboard as opposed to that of a
            computer screen, with images created by phosphorescence. I find dim
            external lighting, low display intensity, dark backgrounds and font
            colors with good contrast to the background to be most soothing.
          • Keith Roberts
            ... Perhaps, but there s a difference in eyestrain created by reflection from a solid surface like a black/greenboard as opposed to that of a computer screen,
            Message 5 of 30 , Aug 31 3:28 PM
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              >-----Original Message-----
              >From: Dave Silvia [mailto:dsilvia@...]
              >Sent: Tuesday, August 31, 2004 12:58 PM
              >To: jonah; vim
              >Subject: RE: Easy On The Eyes
              >
              >Shades of green and blue are easier on the eye (tho' I don't
              >know about a black background, but something softer than stark
              >white). That's why many moons ago blackboards were changed to
              >green.

              Perhaps, but there's a difference in eyestrain created by reflection
              from a solid surface like a black/greenboard as opposed to that of a
              computer screen, with images created by phosphorescence. I find dim
              external lighting, low display intensity, dark backgrounds and font
              colors with good contrast to the background to be most soothing.
            • GD
              ... http://home.att.net/~videomonitors/images/ibm-5151.jpg Comes with its own colour scheme ;-)
              Message 6 of 30 , Aug 31 7:24 PM
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                jonah wrote:

                >Hi,
                >
                >Does anyone know which vim color scheme is supposed to
                >be least stressful on the eyes?
                >
                >To some extent, this is a matter of taste, but I
                >remember reading once about a study which claimed that
                >green or amber text on a black background was supposed
                >to be easiest for humans to look at for long periods.
                >Does anyone know if this is true? If so, which vim
                >color scheme would be best?
                >
                >Thanks,
                >Jonah
                >
                >
                >

                http://home.att.net/~videomonitors/images/ibm-5151.jpg
                <http://home.att.net/%7Evideomonitors/images/ibm-5151.jpg>

                Comes with its own colour scheme ;-)

                Seriously, whether the colour scheme works for you is a function of your
                personal aesthetics and ambient light. Most programmers fall somewhere
                between aesthetically challenged and colour blind, so don't rely on
                anyone's opinions but your own.

                Dark backgrounds work best in a dimly lit environment. Lighter or white
                backgrounds are best in an a brightly-lit environment or where there is
                a lot of natural light, even under the 60Hz green-hued flickering of
                fluorescent lighting. So if you're the type to write code typically at
                2:00 a.m., and the only source of ambient light is a small lamp in the
                corner and the glow from some burning incense, you'll be happier with
                darker schemes. Just don't expect to open a browser window without
                being annoyed by the glare.

                If you're looking for a middle of the road compromise, I doubt you'll be
                satisfied. A certain amount of contrast is required, and studies have
                shown that attention and learning, at least with respect to infants
                (who, admittedly, probably write very little code), increases with contrast.

                I use a modified oceandeep colour scheme. I also have a Fine Arts
                degree. Which makes me dissatisfied with my modifed oceandeep scheme.
                The problem is that no combination of colours will work in all
                environments, and solid colours are, for a lack of a better word,
                unnatural. Staring at the pages of a printed book does not give you the
                eye strain that a computer monitor does because (backlighting issues
                aside) you are not looking at a white background with black text. To
                reproduce those subtle shadows and hues on your screen, you'd need some
                sort of background image/transparency support (among other things), none
                of which is available for your platform, or with vim.

                So, unless you want to dust off that old Underwood, find a scheme that
                *sucks less* than all the others, and take frequent breaks to mitigate
                whatever eye strain that will inevitably result. Remember too that your
                eyes will dry quickly when staring into a monitor because you will blink
                less.

                HTH
              • panshizhu@routon.com
                Hi, It is truly difficult to say which one is best, or which one is least stressful. Since most color scheme is supposed to be least stressful but your mind
                Message 7 of 30 , Aug 31 11:18 PM
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                  Hi,

                  It is truly difficult to say which one is best, or which one is least
                  stressful.

                  Since most color scheme is 'supposed' to be least stressful but your mind
                  may vary.

                  I've got a script in
                  http://vim.sourceforge.net/scripts/script.php?script_id=760
                  Which enables me to tune the whole color scheme easier. It gave examples
                  to tune the whole color scheme to be black background + green foreground,
                  and can be easily changed to amber foreground. Hope you will found it
                  useful.



                  --
                  Sincerely, Pan Shizhu, ext: 2221

                  "jonah" <jonahgoldstein@...> wrote on 2004-09-01 03:20:46:

                  > Hi,
                  >
                  > Does anyone know which vim color scheme is supposed to
                  > be least stressful on the eyes?
                  >
                  > To some extent, this is a matter of taste, but I
                  > remember reading once about a study which claimed that
                  > green or amber text on a black background was supposed
                  > to be easiest for humans to look at for long periods.
                  > Does anyone know if this is true? If so, which vim
                  > color scheme would be best?
                  >
                  > Thanks,
                  > Jonah
                  >
                • Bram Moolenaar
                  ... Right, the average brightness of the screen should match the room around it. Otherwise your eyes need to adjust every time you look away from the screen.
                  Message 8 of 30 , Sep 1, 2004
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                    GD wrote:

                    > Dark backgrounds work best in a dimly lit environment. Lighter or white
                    > backgrounds are best in an a brightly-lit environment or where there is
                    > a lot of natural light, even under the 60Hz green-hued flickering of
                    > fluorescent lighting. So if you're the type to write code typically at
                    > 2:00 a.m., and the only source of ambient light is a small lamp in the
                    > corner and the glow from some burning incense, you'll be happier with
                    > darker schemes. Just don't expect to open a browser window without
                    > being annoyed by the glare.

                    Right, the average brightness of the screen should match the room around
                    it. Otherwise your eyes need to adjust every time you look away from
                    the screen.

                    Besides that, the contrast should be high enough to easily read the
                    text, but not much higher than that. That's why in time of terminals
                    amber was preferred above bright green.

                    I generally prefer a gray background. A white background is often too
                    bright, a black background gives too much contrast. When working with a
                    colored background for a while, white paper starts to look colored.

                    --
                    This sentence is not sure that it exists, but if it does, it will
                    certainly consider the possibility that other sentences exist.

                    /// Bram Moolenaar -- Bram@... -- http://www.Moolenaar.net \\\
                    /// Sponsor Vim, vote for features -- http://www.Vim.org/sponsor/ \\\
                    \\\ Project leader for A-A-P -- http://www.A-A-P.org ///
                    \\\ Buy at Amazon and help AIDS victims -- http://ICCF.nl/click1.html ///
                  • P@draigBrady.com
                    ... Interesting. I tought amber on black would be the easiest on the eye (since less energy would be leaving the screen?). However I ve found the lesser
                    Message 9 of 30 , Sep 1, 2004
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                      Dave Silvia wrote:
                      > Shades of green and blue are easier on the eye (tho' I don't know about a
                      > black background, but something softer than stark white). That's why many
                      > moons ago blackboards were changed to green.

                      Interesting. I tought amber on black would be the easiest
                      on the eye (since less energy would be leaving the screen?).
                      However I've found the lesser contrast of a dark green background
                      the best, and the one I use is called hhteal:

                      http://www-2.cs.cmu.edu/~maverick/VimColorSchemeTest/hhteal-perl.html
                      http://www-2.cs.cmu.edu/~maverick/VimColorSchemeTest/hhteal.vim

                      Pádraig.
                    • Alan G Isaac
                      ... Very nice. But try ... and then set your colorscheme. I think the black stretch initiated by the is surprising. Cheers, Alan Isaac
                      Message 10 of 30 , Sep 1, 2004
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                        On Tue, 31 Aug 2004, Robert Melton apparently wrote:
                        > http://vim.sourceforge.net/scripts/script.php?script_id=985

                        Very nice.
                        But try
                        :h colorscheme
                        and then set your colorscheme.
                        I think the black stretch initiated by the '>'
                        is surprising.

                        Cheers,
                        Alan Isaac
                      • Scott C
                        my personal favorite, of course, is toothpik :) ... __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? Yahoo! Mail - 50x more storage than other providers!
                        Message 11 of 30 , Sep 1, 2004
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                          my personal favorite, of course, is toothpik :)



                          --- Tim Chase <vim@...> wrote:

                          > > Does anyone know which vim color scheme is
                          > supposed to
                          > > be least stressful on the eyes?
                          > >
                          > > To some extent, this is a matter of taste, but I
                          > > remember reading once about a study which claimed
                          > that
                          > > green or amber text on a black background was
                          > supposed
                          > > to be easiest for humans to look at for long
                          > periods.
                          > > Does anyone know if this is true? If so, which
                          > vim
                          > > color scheme would be best?
                          >
                          > I've heard the same study on colors, and tend to
                          > find that for
                          > myself as well. I'd say that, given how easy vim
                          > makes it for
                          > you to create your own colorscheme, just fiddle with
                          > it until
                          > it's what you like. I've made my own that suits my
                          > own
                          > needs/wants. It's somewhat close to the "pablo"
                          > colorscheme that
                          > came with my build. I don't know if there's some
                          > master
                          > repository of colorschemes somewhere...perhaps just
                          > bundled in
                          > with the vimscripts repository or the like. I keep
                          > a copy of it
                          > on my website at
                          >
                          > http://tim.thechases.com/timchase.vim
                          >
                          > If you want to give it a go, or use it as a starting
                          > ground to
                          > tweak and make your own. Consider it released into
                          > the public
                          > domain for all it matters :)
                          >
                          > -tim
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >




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                        • Alan G Isaac
                          For increased portability of the run commands files, (_vimrc and _gvimrc in my case) it would be nice if the argument for colorscheme was a list of color
                          Message 12 of 30 , Sep 1, 2004
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                            For increased portability of the run commands files,
                            (_vimrc and _gvimrc in my case)
                            it would be nice if the argument for
                            colorscheme was a list of color names.
                            (So that first found wd be used.)

                            Or is there any easy way to test for
                            the availability of a colorscheme?

                            fwiw,
                            Alan Isaac
                          • jonah
                            ... GD, Thanks for the discussion. Do you have a reference for the info above? I d like to learn more about this. J
                            Message 13 of 30 , Sep 1, 2004
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                              > Dark backgrounds work best in a dimly lit
                              > environment. Lighter or white
                              > backgrounds are best in an a brightly-lit
                              > environment or where there is
                              > a lot of natural light, even under the
                              > 60Hz green-hued flickering of
                              > fluorescent lighting. So if you're the
                              > type to write code typically at
                              > 2:00 a.m., and the only source of ambient
                              > light is a small lamp in the
                              > corner and the glow from some burning
                              > incense, you'll be happier with
                              > darker schemes. Just don't expect to open
                              > a browser window without
                              > being annoyed by the glare.
                              >

                              GD,

                              Thanks for the discussion. Do you have a reference
                              for the info above? I'd like to learn more about
                              this.

                              J
                            • David Fishburn
                              This seems interesting it just poked its head up on slashdot.org. http://www.utexas.edu/supportut/news_pub/yg_kwallek-color.html Enjoy if interested. Dave
                              Message 14 of 30 , Sep 1, 2004
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                                This seems interesting it just poked its head up on slashdot.org.

                                http://www.utexas.edu/supportut/news_pub/yg_kwallek-color.html


                                Enjoy if interested.

                                Dave
                              • Antoine J. Mechelynck
                                ... Try checing the value of g:colors_name. It won t be set to the new colorscheme name if the latter was not found. Another possibility (in 6.3 and later)
                                Message 15 of 30 , Sep 1, 2004
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                                  Alan G Isaac <aisaac@...> wrote:
                                  > For increased portability of the run commands files,
                                  > (_vimrc and _gvimrc in my case)
                                  > it would be nice if the argument for
                                  > colorscheme was a list of color names.
                                  > (So that first found wd be used.)
                                  >
                                  > Or is there any easy way to test for
                                  > the availability of a colorscheme?
                                  >
                                  > fwiw,
                                  > Alan Isaac

                                  Try checing the value of g:colors_name. It won't be set to the new
                                  colorscheme name if the latter was not found.

                                  Another possibility (in 6.3 and later) would be to catch the error E185
                                  produced when the colorscheme isn't found.

                                  See
                                  :help :colorscheme
                                  :help :try

                                  HTH,
                                  Tony.
                                • Dave Silvia
                                  Try adding the following (minus the echomsg at the end) to your vimrc: command! -nargs=* Mycolorscheme :call Mycolorscheme( ) function!
                                  Message 16 of 30 , Sep 1, 2004
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                                    Try adding the following (minus the echomsg at the end) to your vimrc:


                                    command! -nargs=* Mycolorscheme :call Mycolorscheme(<f-args>)
                                    function! Mycolorscheme(...)
                                    if !exists("g:colors_name")
                                    let defaultColorScheme='blue'
                                    else
                                    let defaultColorScheme=''
                                    endif
                                    let argIdx=1
                                    while argIdx <= a:0
                                    execute 'silent! colorscheme '.a:{argIdx}
                                    if exists("g:colors_name") && g:colors_name == a:{argIdx}
                                    let defaultColorScheme=''
                                    break
                                    endif
                                    let argIdx=argIdx+1
                                    endwhile
                                    if defaultColorScheme != ''
                                    execute 'colorscheme '.defaultColorScheme
                                    endif
                                    endfunction
                                    Mycolorscheme gold dave




                                    echomsg 'Color Scheme is "'.g:colors_name.'"'

                                    Color Scheme is "dave"


                                    If the color scheme was already set and none of your argument schemes were
                                    found, the scheme remains the same. Else if you've defined
                                    defaultColorScheme in the function as '' regardless, the scheme remains the
                                    same.

                                    You can then also use the command 'Mycolorscheme' on the fly in Vim.

                                    HTH,
                                    Dave S.
                                    -----Original Message-----
                                    From: Antoine J. Mechelynck [mailto:antoine.mechelynck@...]
                                    Sent: Wednesday, September 01, 2004 11:10 PM
                                    To: aisaac@...; vim
                                    Subject: Re: Easy On The Eyes

                                    Alan G Isaac <aisaac@...> wrote:
                                    > For increased portability of the run commands files,
                                    > (_vimrc and _gvimrc in my case)
                                    > it would be nice if the argument for
                                    > colorscheme was a list of color names.
                                    > (So that first found wd be used.)
                                    >
                                    > Or is there any easy way to test for
                                    > the availability of a colorscheme?
                                    >
                                    > fwiw,
                                    > Alan Isaac.
                                  • Robert Melton
                                    ... Jonah-- After reading this thread, I remembered to update my Vim Colors Sampler Pack on vim.sf.net --- it is all the themes zipped up into a single
                                    Message 17 of 30 , Sep 1, 2004
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                                      > Hi,
                                      >
                                      > Does anyone know which vim color scheme is supposed to
                                      > be least stressful on the eyes?
                                      >
                                      > To some extent, this is a matter of taste, but I
                                      > remember reading once about a study which claimed that
                                      > green or amber text on a black background was supposed
                                      > to be easiest for humans to look at for long periods.
                                      > Does anyone know if this is true? If so, which vim
                                      > color scheme would be best?
                                      >
                                      > Thanks,
                                      > Jonah
                                      >
                                      >
                                      Jonah--
                                      After reading this thread, I remembered to update my "Vim Colors
                                      Sampler Pack" on vim.sf.net --- it is all the themes zipped up into
                                      a single package -- with a menu to select them by style. Check it out
                                      if you are interested at:

                                      http://vim.sourceforge.net/scripts/script.php?script_id=625

                                      --Robert
                                      #vim on irc.freenode.net --- http://Vi-IMproved.org
                                    • Eugeni Doljenko
                                      ... Heh. That s nice, because i prefer black on grey (or silver ) in windows color scheme, vim, gnome, kde, etc... I just can t work with white background.
                                      Message 18 of 30 , Sep 2, 2004
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                                        > I generally prefer a gray background. A white background is often too
                                        > bright, a black background gives too much contrast. When working with a
                                        > colored background for a while, white paper starts to look colored.
                                        Heh. That's nice, because i prefer black on grey (or "silver") in windows
                                        color scheme, vim, gnome, kde, etc... I just can't work with white
                                        background.
                                        Ofcourse when you turn to nigh programmer you have to choose some kind of
                                        darker or even black background.
                                      • panshizhu@routon.com
                                        I think Bram mean Silver on DarkGrey. instead of Black on Grey. See the ratings, the desert rates best, It is Silver (or to say LightGrey) on DarkGrey... --
                                        Message 19 of 30 , Sep 2, 2004
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                                          I think Bram mean Silver on DarkGrey. instead of Black on Grey.

                                          See the ratings, the "desert" rates best, It is Silver (or to say
                                          LightGrey) on DarkGrey...



                                          --
                                          Sincerely, Pan Shizhu, ext: 2221

                                          "Eugeni Doljenko" <dolzenko@...> wrote on 2004-09-02 15:14:57:

                                          > > I generally prefer a gray background. A white background is often too
                                          > > bright, a black background gives too much contrast. When working with
                                          a
                                          > > colored background for a while, white paper starts to look colored.
                                          > Heh. That's nice, because i prefer black on grey (or "silver") in
                                          windows
                                          > color scheme, vim, gnome, kde, etc... I just can't work with white
                                          > background.
                                          > Ofcourse when you turn to nigh programmer you have to choose some kind
                                          of
                                          > darker or even black background.
                                          >
                                          >
                                        • GD
                                          ... Hmm. Not a /. link, but there is indeed a related one today (maybe you were prognosticating?)
                                          Message 20 of 30 , Sep 2, 2004
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                                            David Fishburn wrote:

                                            >
                                            >This seems interesting it just poked its head up on slashdot.org.
                                            >
                                            >http://www.utexas.edu/supportut/news_pub/yg_kwallek-color.html
                                            >
                                            >
                                            >Enjoy if interested.
                                            >
                                            >Dave
                                            >
                                            >
                                            >

                                            Hmm. Not a /. link, but there is indeed a related one today (maybe you
                                            were prognosticating?)

                                            http://science.slashdot.org/article.pl?sid=04/09/02/0213247&tid=134&tid=1
                                            <http://science.slashdot.org/article.pl?sid=04/09/02/0213247&tid=134&tid=1>

                                            Getting a bit off-topic, but as a follow-up to the OP's questions about
                                            learning more about the subject, I'm afraid I don't have a collection of
                                            specific links. Put another way, the discussion involves everything
                                            from workplace ergonomics, opthamology, colour theory, typography,
                                            psychology and then some.

                                            So where to start?

                                            1. I remember reading a year or two ago an excellent article published
                                            by some Scottsman working for Microsoft at the time that touched on a
                                            wide array of related subjects. Perhaps you can find a link somewhere in
                                            the ClearType resources section on Microsoft's website?

                                            2. Your local opthamologist should be able to recommend some good
                                            reading. I learned from my own, for example, that when using a computer
                                            monitor, eye movement decreases, which leads to a drying effect (a real
                                            problem for contact lens wearers); next time you're in a video rental
                                            shop, observe the invariably dull stare on the person's face standing
                                            behind the counter when he or she looks for information on his/her
                                            monitor, and tell yourself that's most likely how you look. I was also
                                            was made aware that the focal distance for reading a book is *not* the
                                            same as that for a monitor, something that's obvious only after you're
                                            told. If you need corrective lenses, you're looking at a minimum of 2
                                            prescriptions, 3 if you're approaching 40. Here's a link that provides
                                            some very general information on that aspect:

                                            http://idoc.davisvision.com/davis/public/VisionCareResources/vision_01.htm

                                            3. Google is your friend. You should be able to find lots of papers
                                            like this one:

                                            http://personalcomputing.portrait.com/us/products/lv_humanFactors_whitepaper.pdf.

                                            Be sure to search for something like "color theory." You should find
                                            lots of useful reading and be able to learn something even if you don't
                                            consider yourself "artistically inclined."

                                            4. The more practical approach is to vary your own environmental
                                            conditions while alternating between the various schemes in the
                                            all-colour schemes package from vim.org. You should come up with a
                                            subset that *sortofkinda* works and proceed from there. Mind you, if
                                            you're not using a LCD monitor, be sure your monitor's refresh rate is
                                            NOT less than 85Hz, the brightness, contrast, gamma, etc. of your
                                            monitor is corrected for and adjusted (Adobe probably offers a free
                                            utility to download to accomplish this), and you have a minimum of 2
                                            lamps (3 is better) nearby providing good background illumination
                                            (something any Hollywood set designer would tell you). If you spend
                                            most of your time in an office environment, I doubt your office manager
                                            raise an objection to your using a desk lamp to mitigate the ill effects
                                            of fluorescent lighting.

                                            And since you're using Windows, be sure to download the Cygwin package
                                            and get into the habit of using rxvt instead of Windows cmd.exe. You
                                            can set your own fonts, define your own colors and even have custom
                                            classes to implement a different colour scheme for different
                                            console-based applications like vi, mutt, etc. Rxvt, unlike Gvim, also
                                            supports background images (scaled or tiled), and transparency. If your
                                            desktop wallpaper is sufficiently subtle (by that I mean it contains
                                            soft gradients, not a picture of your dog or a goofy tiled bitmap), try
                                            the transparency and see how that works.

                                            Again, best of luck.
                                          • Charles E. Campbell, Jr.
                                            ... I like a dark blue background, plus I like my vim to have the same highlighting as my gvim sessions. Most of the colorschemes are gui-only, or if they
                                            Message 21 of 30 , Sep 2, 2004
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                                              Eugeni Doljenko wrote:

                                              >> I generally prefer a gray background. A white background is often too
                                              >> bright, a black background gives too much contrast. When working with a
                                              >> colored background for a while, white paper starts to look colored.
                                              >
                                              > Heh. That's nice, because i prefer black on grey (or "silver") in
                                              > windows color scheme, vim, gnome, kde, etc... I just can't work with
                                              > white background.
                                              > Ofcourse when you turn to nigh programmer you have to choose some kind
                                              > of darker or even black background.
                                              >
                                              I like a dark blue background, plus I like my vim to have the same
                                              highlighting as my gvim sessions.

                                              Most of the colorschemes are gui-only, or if they support console, are
                                              radically different. I use astronaut.vim,
                                              myself -- of course, I authored it. High contrast, dark background,
                                              same display on vim and gvim (well, I did
                                              italicize a few things under gvim that I don't under vim). Astronaut
                                              has modifiers available; I typically use

                                              let astronaut_bold = 1
                                              let astronaut_underline = 1
                                              color astronaut

                                              which turns bold on and underlining off. On some terminals/machines,
                                              leaving bold on turns all the text
                                              yellow (SGIs in particular). On other machines, leaving bold off yields
                                              excessively dim text. Not all
                                              terminals support underlining; when you try to get underlining on a
                                              machine/terminal that doesn't
                                              support it, often you get reverse video.

                                              Regards,
                                              Chip Campbell
                                            • Keith Roberts
                                              ... =134&tid=1 Excellent article! ... This is excellent info. And also explains why I am most comfortable leaning way back in my swivel/tilt office chair to
                                              Message 22 of 30 , Sep 2, 2004
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                                                >-----Original Message-----
                                                >From: GD [mailto:d1945@...]
                                                >Sent: Thursday, September 02, 2004 5:38 AM
                                                >Cc: 'vim'
                                                >Subject: Re: Easy On The Eyes
                                                >
                                                >http://science.slashdot.org/article.pl?sid=04/09/02/0213247&tid
                                                =134&tid=1

                                                Excellent article!

                                                >Getting a bit off-topic, but as a follow-up [...]
                                                >
                                                >2. Your local opthamologist should be able to recommend some
                                                >good reading. I learned from my own, for example, that when
                                                >using a computer monitor, eye movement decreases, which leads
                                                >to a drying effect (a real problem for contact lens wearers);
                                                >next time you're in a video rental shop, observe the
                                                >invariably dull stare on the person's face standing behind the
                                                >counter when he or she looks for information on his/her
                                                >monitor, and tell yourself that's most likely how you look. I
                                                >was also was made aware that the focal distance for reading a
                                                >book is *not* the same as that for a monitor, something that's
                                                >obvious only after you're told. If you need corrective
                                                >lenses, you're looking at a minimum of 2 prescriptions, 3 if
                                                >you're approaching 40. Here's a link that provides some very
                                                >general information on that aspect:
                                                >
                                                >http://idoc.davisvision.com/davis/public/VisionCareResources/vi
                                                >sion_01.htm

                                                This is excellent info. And also explains why I am most comfortable
                                                leaning way back in my swivel/tilt office chair to peruse anything of
                                                length on the screen. My eyes are 4-5 ft away from the screen then,
                                                instead of the usual 18-20 inches when typing. Bifocals are your friend
                                                after 40 ... :)

                                                >4. The more practical approach is to vary your own
                                                >environmental conditions while alternating between the various
                                                >schemes in the all-colour schemes package from vim.org. You
                                                >should come up with a subset that *sortofkinda* works and
                                                >proceed from there. Mind you, if you're not using a LCD
                                                >monitor, be sure your monitor's refresh rate is NOT less than
                                                >85Hz, the brightness, contrast, gamma, etc. of your monitor is
                                                >corrected for and adjusted (Adobe probably offers a free
                                                >utility to download to accomplish this), and you have a
                                                >minimum of 2 lamps (3 is better) nearby providing good
                                                >background illumination (something any Hollywood set designer
                                                >would tell you). If you spend most of your time in an office
                                                >environment, I doubt your office manager raise an objection to
                                                >your using a desk lamp to mitigate the ill effects of
                                                >fluorescent lighting.

                                                I've removed 2 of the 3 fluorescent tubes from the fixture directly
                                                above me, but for the first time in many years I'm working in a bullpen
                                                (cubicle farm, actually) and just have to put up with too damn much
                                                ambient light. I actually wear prescription sunglasses to work at my
                                                terminal! They do help!
                                              • Alan G Isaac
                                                ... Your preview link is dead: http://mysite.verizon.net/astronaut/vim/colorscheme.html fwiw, Alan Isaac
                                                Message 23 of 30 , Sep 2, 2004
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                                                  On Thu, 02 Sep 2004, Jr. Charles E. Campbell apparently wrote:
                                                  > I use astronaut.vim,

                                                  Your preview link is dead:
                                                  http://mysite.verizon.net/astronaut/vim/colorscheme.html

                                                  fwiw,
                                                  Alan Isaac
                                                • Alejandro Lopez-Valencia
                                                  ... You don t need rxvt to have a different color selection. If you are using the Win32 console (that is, the Windows NT console), you do have access to RGB
                                                  Message 24 of 30 , Sep 2, 2004
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                                                    At 08:37 a.m. 02/09/2004, GD wrote:

                                                    >And since you're using Windows, be sure to download the Cygwin package and
                                                    >get into the habit of using rxvt instead of Windows cmd.exe. You can set
                                                    >your own fonts, define your own colors and even have custom classes to
                                                    >implement a different colour scheme for different console-based
                                                    >applications like vi, mutt, etc. Rxvt, unlike Gvim, also supports
                                                    >background images (scaled or tiled), and transparency. If your desktop
                                                    >wallpaper is sufficiently subtle (by that I mean it contains soft
                                                    >gradients, not a picture of your dog or a goofy tiled bitmap), try the
                                                    >transparency and see how that works.

                                                    You don't need rxvt to have a different color selection. If you are using
                                                    the Win32 console (that is, the Windows NT console), you do have access to
                                                    RGB colors (256^3), but you can use only 16 at a time. You can fiddle with
                                                    the settings by accessing the properties window of a running Cygwin console
                                                    and fiddle with then until you are satisfied, then save for all sesssions
                                                    invoked from that shortcut. Or, you can hack the terminfo entry, whatever
                                                    you find more appealing :-)

                                                    If you want to change the color settings globally for all the consoles you
                                                    may open in your system, select the properties windows of a *non running*
                                                    console shortcut and hack the colors there.
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