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Re: Learning vim "portably"

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  • Antony Scriven
    ... If you are going to be using random Unix boxes then be prepared for no vim either. But don t worry, Vim is 99% vi compatible. Stay away from the scroll bar
    Message 1 of 6 , Apr 2, 2004
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      Chris Lott wrote:

      > I've decided it is high time that I learn to use vim. Though I am
      > confirmed emacs user, there are times when it is not available. However,
      > I would like to learn vim in a way that is as portable as possible. My
      > primary computer runs windows xp.
      >
      > I installed gvim62.exe and it seems to work fine. However, I noticed
      > that by default it has a number of things configured for me. A few of
      > these look like windows specific hackery/emulation. So my question is,
      > what represents a "vanilla" vim installation as I am likely to encounter
      > it on a foreign system, particularly a Unix/Linux system running X?

      If you are going to be using random Unix boxes then be
      prepared for no vim either. But don't worry, Vim is 99% vi
      compatible. Stay away from the scroll bar and arrow keys and
      you'll be fine :-) The tutorial is a good one, and it
      teaches you all the basics which are present in any version
      of vi.

      >
      > The default _vimrc looks like the following: should I just get rid of
      > the mswin.vim line?
      >
      > **
      > set nocompatible

      Hmm, does this need to be unset? I thought the mere
      prescence of a .vimrc (I'm assuming also a _vimrc) would set
      nocompatible.

      > source $VIMRUNTIME/vimrc_example.vim

      This changes a few things, but not a lot, and nothing bad
      (unless you like ex mode :-). It's a standard file, so all
      systems should have it. If you add more stuff to your vimrc
      make sure it comes after this line. It sets nocompatible
      which in turn sets some other options.

      > source $VIMRUNTIME/mswin.vim

      This is for people who /have/ to hit Ctrl-F4 to close a
      window and Ctrl-V to paste. It sounds like you don't want
      this.

      > behave mswin

      This sets mouse/selection behaviour. See `:help behave' to
      check what this does. I would suggest that you don't use
      this either. But some people prefer things to be more
      windowsy when on a windows system.

      Hmm, mswin.vim does a `behave mswin' anyway so I don't know
      why that's in the file.

      Antony
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