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Re: One more question

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  • Hichem Fadali
    I did set isprint as you said, but that s not the problem... By the way, I am running version 5.7 on UNIX, and I am not running the GUI version... What is ga
    Message 1 of 20 , Oct 1, 2002
      I did set isprint as you said, but that's not the problem... By the way,
      I am running version 5.7 on UNIX, and I am not running the GUI version...

      What is 'ga' that you mentioned to find out if a character has been
      inserted??? and how is it used???

      Thanks.

      Hichem

      > Hichem Fadali wrote:
      >
      > > How are you doing?
      > > I have one last ( I hope ) problem that doesn't seem to make sense...
      > > I created this new font, of an extra 128 glyphs. They go from 0x80 to
      > > 0xFF...
      > > Now, the problem that I am having is that for any glyphs between 0x80 and
      > > 0x9F, the glyphs don't get printed in Vim, whereas any of the other glyphs
      > > do get printed. So for only these 1st 32 glyphs, I get a space when I
      > > hit the keyboard key that corresponds to it.
      > >
      > > Any clues why?
      >
      > These characters should work fine in MS-Windows and MS-DOS with the
      > default font, thus I don't see why they would not work on other systems.
      > You did do:
      >
      > :set isprint+=128-160
      >
      > otherwise you wouldn't get a space. Does the character actually get
      > inserted? Use "ga" to find out. I can't think of another reason for a
      > display problem.
      >
      > --
      > How many light bulbs does it take to change a person?
      >
      > /// Bram Moolenaar -- Bram@... -- http://www.moolenaar.net \\\
      > /// Creator of Vim - Vi IMproved -- http://www.vim.org \\\
      > \\\ Project leader for A-A-P -- http://www.a-a-p.org ///
      > \\\ Lord Of The Rings helps Uganda - http://iccf-holland.org/lotr.html ///
      >
    • Tim Chase
      ... just like one uses ^G to figure out where you are (line/column) in normal mode, ga reports back the current ascii value in hex and decimal of the
      Message 2 of 20 , Oct 1, 2002
        > What is 'ga' that you mentioned to find out if a character has been
        > inserted??? and how is it used???

        just like one uses ^G to figure out where you are (line/column) in normal
        mode, "ga" reports back the current ascii value in hex and decimal of the
        character currently under the cursor.

        see:
        :he ga

        -tim
      • Hichem Fadali
        For a character at Hex 0x85, when I use ga , I get the following: 133, Hex 85, Octal 205 So, how come the I get instead of getting
        Message 3 of 20 , Oct 3, 2002
          For a character at Hex 0x85, when I use 'ga', I get the following:

          <> <~E> <M-^E> 133, Hex 85, Octal 205

          So, how come the I get "<>" instead of getting "<the glyph>"???
          And I do have :set isprint... set

          One more thing: Did you say that it worked in gvim??? Did you try it with
          the Farsi?

          Thanks.

          Hichem

          On Mon, 30 Sep 2002, Bram Moolenaar wrote:

          >
          > Hichem Fadali wrote:
          >
          > > How are you doing?
          > > I have one last ( I hope ) problem that doesn't seem to make sense...
          > > I created this new font, of an extra 128 glyphs. They go from 0x80 to
          > > 0xFF...
          > > Now, the problem that I am having is that for any glyphs between 0x80 and
          > > 0x9F, the glyphs don't get printed in Vim, whereas any of the other glyphs
          > > do get printed. So for only these 1st 32 glyphs, I get a space when I
          > > hit the keyboard key that corresponds to it.
          > >
          > > Any clues why?
          >
          > These characters should work fine in MS-Windows and MS-DOS with the
          > default font, thus I don't see why they would not work on other systems.
          > You did do:
          >
          > :set isprint+=128-160
          >
          > otherwise you wouldn't get a space. Does the character actually get
          > inserted? Use "ga" to find out. I can't think of another reason for a
          > display problem.
          >
          > --
          > How many light bulbs does it take to change a person?
          >
          > /// Bram Moolenaar -- Bram@... -- http://www.moolenaar.net \\\
          > /// Creator of Vim - Vi IMproved -- http://www.vim.org \\\
          > \\\ Project leader for A-A-P -- http://www.a-a-p.org ///
          > \\\ Lord Of The Rings helps Uganda - http://iccf-holland.org/lotr.html ///
          >
        • Bram Moolenaar
          ... Apparently printing the 0x85 character ends up as nothing on the screen. There must be something in the path between Vim and the screen that decides not
          Message 4 of 20 , Oct 3, 2002
            Hichem Fadali wrote:

            > For a character at Hex 0x85, when I use 'ga', I get the following:
            >
            > <> <~E> <M-^E> 133, Hex 85, Octal 205
            >
            > So, how come the I get "<>" instead of getting "<the glyph>"???
            > And I do have :set isprint... set

            Apparently printing the 0x85 character ends up as "nothing" on the
            screen.

            There must be something in the path between Vim and the screen that
            decides not to display this character. You could debug Vim to find out
            if this is a Vim problem or a problem with the system functions.
            I don't think Vim filters out characters 0x80-0x9f, thus I would expect
            a problem with system functions. But that needs to be verified.

            > One more thing: Did you say that it worked in gvim??? Did you try it with
            > the Farsi?

            I didn't try this out, since I don't have a font for this.

            --
            hundred-and-one symptoms of being an internet addict:
            111. You and your friends get together regularly on IRC, even though
            all of you live in the same city.

            /// Bram Moolenaar -- Bram@... -- http://www.moolenaar.net \\\
            /// Creator of Vim - Vi IMproved -- http://www.vim.org \\\
            \\\ Project leader for A-A-P -- http://www.a-a-p.org ///
            \\\ Lord Of The Rings helps Uganda - http://iccf-holland.org/lotr.html ///
          • Hichem Fadali
            You said that some encoding might have 0x80 to 0x9f invalid, while 0xa0 to 0xff are valid, how can find out which encodings allow what? Where can I find this
            Message 5 of 20 , Oct 3, 2002
              You said that some encoding might have 0x80 to 0x9f invalid, while 0xa0 to
              0xff are valid, how can find out which encodings allow what? Where can I
              find this information?
              I created the font that I am using, so it doesn't really say which
              encoding is to be used with it.

              Thanks.

              Hichem

              On Tue, 1 Oct 2002, Antoine J. Mechelynck wrote:

              > Hichem Fadali <hfadali@...> wrote:
              > > I don't know how to look up the fileencoding that is being used for the
              > > buffer.
              >
              > put the cursor in the buffer in question, then do
              >
              > :setlocal fileencoding?
              >
              > > But how come it works for the created glyphs from 0xA0 to 0xFF???
              > > I just get a space between 0x80 and 0x9F.
              >
              > in some encodings, 80-9F are invalid while A0-FF are valid. I don't know how
              > you define a new font. I suppose the definition says somewhere either what
              > encoding (latin1, iso-8851-3, euc-jp, ...) should be used with that font, or
              > to which Unicode codepoints the various glyphs are assigned, or both. AFAIK,
              > codepoints 80-9F are invalid in Unicode so you musn't use those Unicode
              > codepoints in the definition of any glyphs.
              >
              > HTH,
              > Tony.
              >
              > P.S. The Unicode site starts at http://www.unicode.org . It is full of
              > interesting info -- sometimes so full that you drown in it.
              >
              >
              >
            • Antoine J. Mechelynck
              ... I don t know. I suppose it would depend on the encoding. For Unicode the homepage is at http://www.unicode.org , the other pages ought to be accessible
              Message 6 of 20 , Oct 3, 2002
                Hichem Fadali <hfadali@...> wrote:
                > You said that some encoding might have 0x80 to 0x9f invalid, while 0xa0 to
                > 0xff are valid, how can find out which encodings allow what? Where can I
                > find this information?
                > I created the font that I am using, so it doesn't really say which
                > encoding is to be used with it.
                >
                > Thanks.
                >
                > Hichem

                I don't know.

                I suppose it would depend on the encoding.

                For Unicode the homepage is at http://www.unicode.org , the other pages
                ought to be accessible from there. It is not unbelieveable that the ISO
                definitions might be referenced from within the Unicode site. The Windows
                encodings might -- or might not -- be accessible from
                http://www.microsoft.com/ . I wouldn't know where to start for an East Asian
                encoding.

                You say you created the font. I suppose you must have followed some specific
                format. Where did it come from? Is it a bitmapped font or a vector font?
                Does the font definition contain nothing at all in addition to the bitmaps
                or vector definitions for the glyphs?

                Let's hope someone more enlightened than me will be able to help you.

                Tony.
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