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Re: Gurus - does/can Vim have a functionality resembling Info?

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  • Erik Christiansen
    ... It s worth noting that Vim provides easy block shuffling without further ado. Just close a fold with zc, then cut it with dd (whatever its length in lines,
    Message 1 of 11 , Feb 16, 2013
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      On 16.02.13 20:48, Philip Rhoades wrote:
      > Thanks for all that - I was familiar with a some of it. I ended up using
      > the VOom plugin which makes use of a lot what you suggested but in a nice
      > two panel setup - allows easy block shuffling around etc.

      It's worth noting that Vim provides easy block shuffling without further
      ado. Just close a fold with zc, then cut it with dd (whatever its length
      in lines, it's treated as one while closed.), then paste with p
      somewhere else in the document. If you want to move three consecutive
      closed folds, use 3dd.

      That suffices for me, zooming multi-page multi-level nested folds around
      a 300+ page document - effortlessly. It has transformed my editing, and
      the quality of the structure of the document.

      Erik

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    • Philip Rhoades
      Erik, ... More useful tips - thanks! Phil. -- Philip Rhoades GPO Box 3411 Sydney NSW 2001 Australia E-mail: phil@pricom.com.au -- -- You received this message
      Message 2 of 11 , Feb 17, 2013
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        Erik,


        On 2013-02-16 23:33, Erik Christiansen wrote:
        > On 16.02.13 20:48, Philip Rhoades wrote:
        >> Thanks for all that - I was familiar with a some of it. I ended up
        >> using
        >> the VOom plugin which makes use of a lot what you suggested but in a
        >> nice
        >> two panel setup - allows easy block shuffling around etc.
        >
        > It's worth noting that Vim provides easy block shuffling without
        > further
        > ado. Just close a fold with zc, then cut it with dd (whatever its
        > length
        > in lines, it's treated as one while closed.), then paste with p
        > somewhere else in the document. If you want to move three consecutive
        > closed folds, use 3dd.
        >
        > That suffices for me, zooming multi-page multi-level nested folds
        > around
        > a 300+ page document - effortlessly. It has transformed my editing,
        > and
        > the quality of the structure of the document.


        More useful tips - thanks!

        Phil.
        --
        Philip Rhoades

        GPO Box 3411
        Sydney NSW 2001
        Australia
        E-mail: phil@...

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      • Anthony Campbell
        ... Interesting, but why is it better than just marking a block in Visual and cutting and pasting it? Anthony -- Anthony Campbell - ac@acampbell.org.uk
        Message 3 of 11 , Feb 17, 2013
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          On 16 Feb 2013, Erik Christiansen wrote:
          > On 16.02.13 20:48, Philip Rhoades wrote:
          > > Thanks for all that - I was familiar with a some of it. I ended up using
          > > the VOom plugin which makes use of a lot what you suggested but in a nice
          > > two panel setup - allows easy block shuffling around etc.
          >
          > It's worth noting that Vim provides easy block shuffling without further
          > ado. Just close a fold with zc, then cut it with dd (whatever its length
          > in lines, it's treated as one while closed.), then paste with p
          > somewhere else in the document. If you want to move three consecutive
          > closed folds, use 3dd.
          >
          > That suffices for me, zooming multi-page multi-level nested folds around
          > a 300+ page document - effortlessly. It has transformed my editing, and
          > the quality of the structure of the document.
          >
          > Erik
          >


          Interesting, but why is it better than just marking a block in Visual
          and cutting and pasting it?

          Anthony

          --
          Anthony Campbell - ac@...
          http://www.acampbell.org.uk
          http://www.reviewbooks.org.uk
          http://www.skepticviews.org.uk
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          https://itunes.apple.com/ca/artist/anthony-campbell/id73235412





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        • Erik Christiansen
          ... A look back at my first post on this thread¹ shows that the top level folded view provided a table of contents for the whole document, while the closed
          Message 4 of 11 , Feb 17, 2013
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            On 17.02.13 08:58, Anthony Campbell wrote:
            > On 16 Feb 2013, Erik Christiansen wrote:
            > > It's worth noting that Vim provides easy block shuffling without further
            > > ado. Just close a fold with zc, then cut it with dd (whatever its length
            > > in lines, it's treated as one while closed.), then paste with p
            > > somewhere else in the document. If you want to move three consecutive
            > > closed folds, use 3dd.
            > >
            > > That suffices for me, zooming multi-page multi-level nested folds around
            > > a 300+ page document - effortlessly. It has transformed my editing, and
            > > the quality of the structure of the document.

            > Interesting, but why is it better than just marking a block in Visual
            > and cutting and pasting it?

            A look back at my first post on this thread¹ shows that the top level
            folded view provided a table of contents for the whole document, while
            the closed folds in the opened "VIM:" fold provided an in-situ TOC for
            that section. Since the (potentially) pages of text in a fold is already
            presented as a line-equivalent unit, directly manipulable by simple
            familiar vim commands, it would be a backward step to open the fold and
            then begin to manually muck about constructing a matching visual block,
            to define the text which is already defined by the fold. It is less
            effort to use what is already there, neatly folded into one line.

            As mentioned in that other post, a visual block, then zf, is the easiest
            way to initially create the fold, but afterwards it need not ever be
            done again.

            Trying it out might be the best way to come to grips with what it can do
            - proof of the pudding, and all that.

            Erik

            ¹ Don't want to clutter the list with that again, if it's not needed.

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            habits, and therefore on our thinking abilities.
            -Edsgar W. Dijkstra

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          • Anthony Campbell
            ... [snip] Sorry, I lost track of how this thread started. Yes, I see why folding is an advantage in this case, and I expect I shall use it to keep track of my
            Message 5 of 11 , Feb 17, 2013
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              On 17 Feb 2013, Erik Christiansen wrote:
              >
              > > Interesting, but why is it better than just marking a block in Visual
              > > and cutting and pasting it?
              >
              > A look back at my first post on this threadน shows that the top level
              > folded view provided a table of contents for the whole document, while
              > the closed folds in the opened "VIM:" fold provided an in-situ TOC for
              > that section. Since the (potentially) pages of text in a fold is already
              > presented as a line-equivalent unit, directly manipulable by simple
              > familiar vim commands, it would be a backward step to open the fold and
              > then begin to manually muck about constructing a matching visual block,
              > to define the text which is already defined by the fold. It is less
              > effort to use what is already there, neatly folded into one line.
              >

              [snip]

              Sorry, I lost track of how this thread started. Yes, I see why folding
              is an advantage in this case, and I expect I shall use it to keep track
              of my own files that remind me of how to do things, as well as addresses
              etc.

              My last comment was relative to 'ordinary' text files, such as articles
              or books, although even there I can see a use for folding occasionally,
              e.g. for writing notes to myself and keeping track of deleted sections.
              The equivalent of marginal notes in the old days of typewriters. I don't
              know why I didn't think of that - I never found a use for folding
              previously. Thanks for making me reflect - you have probably improved my
              writing habits quite a bit.

              Anthony


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              http://www.acampbell.org.uk
              http://www.reviewbooks.org.uk
              http://www.skepticviews.org.uk
              http://www.acupuncturecourse.org.uk
              http://www.smashwords.com/profile.view/acampbell
              https://itunes.apple.com/ca/artist/anthony-campbell/id73235412





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