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Re: Mapping keys Ctrl-K Ctrl-C

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  • ashwin sathya
    Apologies for not speciying WHERE i am using Vim. I am using it on windows. and my _vimrc has the following in the beginning. set nocompatible be
    Message 1 of 5 , Oct 29, 2012
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      Apologies for not speciying WHERE i am using Vim. I am using it on windows. and my _vimrc has the following in the beginning.
      set nocompatible        " be iMproved
      source $VIMRUNTIME/mswin.vim
      behave mswin            " required!

      I assume this takes of the mswin behaviour.
      Thanks for extensive support on my problem forum. I will try to see if anything else works around for me.


      On Sun, Oct 28, 2012 at 11:55 PM, Henry Hertz Hobbit <hhhobbit@...> wrote:
      On Saturday, October 27, 2012 4:44:17 PM UTC, ashwin sathya wrote:
      > Hi,
      >
      > I am fairly new to Vim and a primary Visual Studio user. I have installed nerd commenter and would like to map Ctrl+k Ctrl+c for commenting(this is the same shortcut in visual studio), so i have these lines in my vimrc
      >
      > map <C-K><C-c> <leader>cc
      > map <C-K><C-U> <leader>cu
      >
      >
      > the <leader>cc and <leader>cu are mapped to NERD commands accordingly. I am having some trouble mapping C-c (BREAK ?? ) is there any workaround for this ?
      >

      I was waiting for somebody else to give an elightened comment.  Actually the one that was given was enlighteed, but it seemed to have a 'nix bias.  I think you need to say WHERE you are using vim.  I am sssuming Windows where <C-c> is usually mapped to COPY which is not hard wired into it.  It is put into it with what is in the _vimrc (you said neither ~/.vimrc nor _vimrc which causes me to guess).  Here is what I wrote for that it is worth:

      http://www.securemecca.com/public/VimKeyMap.txt

      I leave it to you to determine if you are on Windows and using vim with a mswin behavior (see previous file) whether giving up the default behavior of <C-c> being a copy and doing away with it altogether is worth it.  If you are on 'nix <C-c> usually either prints that message on how to exit or cancels a current operation in modes other than command mode.  It usually does not exit vim as you would suppose.  It is just that <C-c> is mapped to other behaviors and usually wiping out those mappings may not be what you want to do.  You may have problems seeing the previous file and the one it references.  The reason I say that is because a  school named BYU blocks (blocked?) access to securemecca.  That is not just for the campus.  BYU also offers an inexpensive broadband connection for their students and it will also block access to my web-site.  I assume they are not the lone strangers.  So I just mailed the files to you as well.

      Please let us know WHERE you are using vim, and if on Windows whether or not you are using the mswin behavior and for me the mswin.vim file which is what I assume.

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      --
      Thanks & Regards,
      R Ashwin Sathya

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