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Re: How to :new a window below the current window?

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  • Tim Chase
    ... You can use ... which you can read about at ... If you want it to always split below, you can investigate the splitbelow option ... which you can set in
    Message 1 of 7 , May 1, 2010
      On 05/01/2010 05:59 PM, Peng Yu wrote:
      > :new by default open a window above the current window. Is there a
      > command to open a new window below the current one?

      You can use

      :below new

      which you can read about at

      :help :below

      If you want it to always split below, you can investigate the
      'splitbelow' option

      :help 'splitbelow'

      which you can set in your vimrc so that new/split windows are
      created below the current one instead of above it. However, it's
      easy enough to override with the ":bel" command.

      -tim



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    • Gary Johnson
      ... See ... Regards, Gary -- You received this message from the vim_use maillist. Do not top-post! Type your reply below the text you are replying to. For
      Message 2 of 7 , May 1, 2010
        On 2010-05-01, Peng Yu <pengyu.ut@...> wrote:
        > :new by default open a window above the current window. Is there a
        > command to open a new window below the current one?

        To do it once:

        :belowright new

        To do it every time:

        :set splitbelow
        :new

        See

        :help :belowright
        :help 'splitbelow'

        Regards,
        Gary

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      • Peng Yu
        ... open file under cursor map :exe below new .expand( ) map :exe new .expand( ) I put the above comand in ~/.vimrc.
        Message 3 of 7 , May 1, 2010
          On May 1, 6:13 pm, Tim Chase <v...@...> wrote:
          > On 05/01/2010 05:59 PM, Peng Yu wrote:
          >
          > > :new by default open a window above the current window. Is there a
          > > command to open a new window below the current one?
          >
          > You can use
          >
          >    :below new
          >
          > which you can read about at
          >
          >    :help :below
          >
          > If you want it to always split below, you can investigate the
          > 'splitbelow' option
          >
          >    :help 'splitbelow'
          >
          > which you can set in your vimrc so that new/split windows are
          > created below the current one instead of above it.  However, it's
          > easy enough to override with the ":bel" command.

          "open file under cursor
          map <C-O> :exe "below new ".expand("<cfile>")<CR>
          map <C-S-O> :exe "new ".expand("<cfile>")<CR>

          I put the above comand in ~/.vimrc. I expect that ctrl+shift+o open a
          new window above the current one and ctrl+o open a new window below
          the current one. However, both of them open a new window above the
          current one. Would you please let me know how to fix the first command?

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        • Tony Mechelynck
          ... Ctrl-O and Ctrl-Shift-O are both 0x0F; if you map them to different {rhs}es, the last one wins. Also, this hides the standard meaning of Ctrl-O, namely,
          Message 4 of 7 , May 2, 2010
            On 02/05/10 01:49, Peng Yu wrote:
            >
            >
            > On May 1, 6:13 pm, Tim Chase<v...@...> wrote:
            >> On 05/01/2010 05:59 PM, Peng Yu wrote:
            >>
            >>> :new by default open a window above the current window. Is there a
            >>> command to open a new window below the current one?
            >>
            >> You can use
            >>
            >> :below new
            >>
            >> which you can read about at
            >>
            >> :help :below
            >>
            >> If you want it to always split below, you can investigate the
            >> 'splitbelow' option
            >>
            >> :help 'splitbelow'
            >>
            >> which you can set in your vimrc so that new/split windows are
            >> created below the current one instead of above it. However, it's
            >> easy enough to override with the ":bel" command.
            >
            > "open file under cursor
            > map<C-O> :exe "below new ".expand("<cfile>")<CR>
            > map<C-S-O> :exe "new ".expand("<cfile>")<CR>
            >
            > I put the above comand in ~/.vimrc. I expect that ctrl+shift+o open a
            > new window above the current one and ctrl+o open a new window below
            > the current one. However, both of them open a new window above the
            > current one. Would you please let me know how to fix the first command?
            >

            Ctrl-O and Ctrl-Shift-O are both 0x0F; if you map them to different
            {rhs}es, the last one wins. Also, this hides the standard meaning of
            Ctrl-O, namely, "go to older place in jumplist". Try mapping them to,
            let's say, F8 and Shift-F8 instead.

            Best regards,
            Tony.
            --
            Moon, n.:
            1. A celestial object whose phase is very important to
            hackers. See PHASE OF THE MOON. 2. Dave Moon (MOON@MC).

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          • Peng Yu
            On May 2, 12:52 pm, Tony Mechelynck ... Why Ctrl-O and Ctrl-Shift-O can not be distinguished? I can not use F8 as my vncviewer
            Message 5 of 7 , May 2, 2010
              On May 2, 12:52 pm, Tony Mechelynck <antoine.mechely...@...>
              wrote:
              > On 02/05/10 01:49, Peng Yu wrote:
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > > On May 1, 6:13 pm, Tim Chase<v...@...>  wrote:
              > >> On 05/01/2010 05:59 PM, Peng Yu wrote:
              >
              > >>> :new by default open a window above the current window. Is there a
              > >>> command to open a new window below the current one?
              >
              > >> You can use
              >
              > >>     :below new
              >
              > >> which you can read about at
              >
              > >>     :help :below
              >
              > >> If you want it to always split below, you can investigate the
              > >> 'splitbelow' option
              >
              > >>     :help 'splitbelow'
              >
              > >> which you can set in your vimrc so that new/split windows are
              > >> created below the current one instead of above it.  However, it's
              > >> easy enough to override with the ":bel" command.
              >
              > > "open file under cursor
              > > map<C-O>  :exe "below new ".expand("<cfile>")<CR>
              > > map<C-S-O>  :exe "new ".expand("<cfile>")<CR>
              >
              > > I put the above comand in ~/.vimrc. I expect that ctrl+shift+o open a
              > > new window above the current one and ctrl+o open a new window below
              > > the current one. However, both of them open a new window above the
              > > current one. Would you please let me know how to fix the first command?
              >
              > Ctrl-O and Ctrl-Shift-O are both 0x0F; if you map them to different
              > {rhs}es, the last one wins. Also, this hides the standard meaning of
              > Ctrl-O, namely, "go to older place in jumplist". Try mapping them to,
              > let's say, F8 and Shift-F8 instead.

              Why Ctrl-O and Ctrl-Shift-O can not be distinguished?

              I can not use F8 as my vncviewer use it for a special meaning. What
              about F7? Does it have any designated usage?

              In general, how to figure out if a combination of keys are used or not
              and whether they are combinations that can be understand by vim?

              Regards,
              Tony.

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            • Tony Mechelynck
              ... Because that s how ASCII defined the control characters long ago. Basically, 0x00 to 0x1F correspond to Ctrl together with 0x40 to 0x5F respectively, but
              Message 6 of 7 , May 2, 2010
                On 02/05/10 22:35, Peng Yu wrote:
                >
                >
                > On May 2, 12:52 pm, Tony Mechelynck<antoine.mechely...@...>
                > wrote:
                >> On 02/05/10 01:49, Peng Yu wrote:
                >>
                >>
                >>
                >>
                >>
                >>> On May 1, 6:13 pm, Tim Chase<v...@...> wrote:
                >>>> On 05/01/2010 05:59 PM, Peng Yu wrote:
                >>
                >>>>> :new by default open a window above the current window. Is there a
                >>>>> command to open a new window below the current one?
                >>
                >>>> You can use
                >>
                >>>> :below new
                >>
                >>>> which you can read about at
                >>
                >>>> :help :below
                >>
                >>>> If you want it to always split below, you can investigate the
                >>>> 'splitbelow' option
                >>
                >>>> :help 'splitbelow'
                >>
                >>>> which you can set in your vimrc so that new/split windows are
                >>>> created below the current one instead of above it. However, it's
                >>>> easy enough to override with the ":bel" command.
                >>
                >>> "open file under cursor
                >>> map<C-O> :exe "below new ".expand("<cfile>")<CR>
                >>> map<C-S-O> :exe "new ".expand("<cfile>")<CR>
                >>
                >>> I put the above comand in ~/.vimrc. I expect that ctrl+shift+o open a
                >>> new window above the current one and ctrl+o open a new window below
                >>> the current one. However, both of them open a new window above the
                >>> current one. Would you please let me know how to fix the first command?
                >>
                >> Ctrl-O and Ctrl-Shift-O are both 0x0F; if you map them to different
                >> {rhs}es, the last one wins. Also, this hides the standard meaning of
                >> Ctrl-O, namely, "go to older place in jumplist". Try mapping them to,
                >> let's say, F8 and Shift-F8 instead.
                >
                > Why Ctrl-O and Ctrl-Shift-O can not be distinguished?

                Because that's how ASCII defined the control characters long ago.
                Basically, 0x00 to 0x1F correspond to Ctrl together with 0x40 to 0x5F
                respectively, but it was decided that it was unnecessary to hold Shift
                when hitting Ctrl with a letter.

                >
                > I can not use F8 as my vncviewer use it for a special meaning. What
                > about F7? Does it have any designated usage?

                In Vim, only F1 has a special usage (Help). If you haven't yet remapped
                F7 or Shift-F7, and if your window manager doesn't preempt them, you're
                free to use them.

                >
                > In general, how to figure out if a combination of keys are used or not
                > and whether they are combinations that can be understand by vim?

                For a particular key combo in a particular mode, use the help. For
                instance ":help CTRL-O" for Ctrl-O in Normal mode, ":help i_CTRL-V" (and
                ":help i_CTRL-V_digit") for Ctrl-V in Insert mode, ":help c_CTRL-R" for
                Ctrl-R in Command-line mode, etc.

                To find an unused key, your best chance is the Fn keys, but you may also
                look at the index.txt helpfile (by using :help index.txt) which has a
                summary of all key bindings used by Vim.

                To know if a key has been mapped and where, use (e.g. for F7)

                :verbose map <F7>
                :verbose map! <F7>

                The command without the exclamation mark gives the mappings for Normal,
                Visual, Select and Operator-pending modes, with the exclamation mark
                those for Insert/Replace and Command-line modes. See ":help map-listing"
                and ":help :map-verbose" for details.

                To know if a given key is understood by Vim you can either use it in
                Insert mode, prefixed with Ctrl-V or (for a special key) CTRL-K, to see
                if something is inserted in your buffer, or else, after checking that it
                isn't mapped yet, define a mapping for it, for example

                :map <S-C-F4> :echo 'Hello! You just hit Shift-Control-F4!'<CR>

                then see if that mapping works.


                Best regards,
                Tony.
                --
                It's not an optical illusion, it just looks like one.
                -- Phil White

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