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Re: unicode conversions

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  • Tony Mechelynck
    Well, maybe not iconv then. (Guess I m a little out of my depth in this ml.) Or is it some browsers trying to improve on non-available from-unicode
    Message 1 of 6 , Aug 16, 2002
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      Well, maybe not iconv then. (Guess I'm a little out of my depth in this ml.)
      Or is it some browsers trying to "improve" on non-available from-unicode
      conversions? I know Lynx converts Unicode eta to cp437 y and I think
      Konqueror does the same when its default display is iso-8859-1 but I'm less
      sure of that. Yesterday I sent a Unicode mail with a sentence in Esperanto
      and got it back quoted in some non-unicode reply mail from the US with the
      circumflexes stripped but the letters otherwise OK. Just haphazard symptoms,
      as you see. Maybe I shoulda kept silent.

      Tony.

      ----- Original Message -----
      From: "Glenn Maynard" <glenn@...>
      To: <vim-multibyte@...>
      Sent: Saturday, August 17, 2002 1:16 AM
      Subject: Re: unicode conversions


      > On Sat, Aug 17, 2002 at 12:49:25AM +0200, Tony Mechelynck wrote:
      > > I suppose you guys don't mind but sometimes Unicode-to-other conversion
      will
      > > give ambiguous, non-uniform or dubious results such as Greek eta
      becoming
      > > Latin y (while in many cases Latin e would be more appropriate) or
      >
      > Converting from Unicode to ISO-8859-7 converts Greek eta (U+0397) to
      > Greek eta (0xC7).
      >
      > Converting from Unicode to ISO-8859-1 does the same thing to eta as
      > converting from ISO-8859-7 to ISO-8859-1 does: it fails, since the
      > character isn't available:
      >
      > 07:12 PM glenn@.../2 [~] iconv -t ISO-8859-7 | iconv -f ISO-8859-7
      > -t ISO-8859-1//TRANSLIT
      > Î-
      > ?
      >
      > If iconv provided an inaccurate translit for UTF8->8859-1, it'd probably
      > be inaccurate for 8859-7, too.
      >
      > So, if this is a problem, I don't see how it's any worse with Unicode.
      > Could you expound a bit?
      >
      > --
      > Glenn Maynard
      >
    • Glenn Maynard
      ... Lynx has its own transliteration. It s poor to uselessness, in my experience. (I ve only tried it with Japanese hiragana; that s an easy translit, though
      Message 2 of 6 , Aug 16, 2002
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        On Sat, Aug 17, 2002 at 01:25:26AM +0200, Tony Mechelynck wrote:
        > Well, maybe not iconv then. (Guess I'm a little out of my depth in this ml.)
        > Or is it some browsers trying to "improve" on non-available from-unicode
        > conversions? I know Lynx converts Unicode eta to cp437 y and I think

        Lynx has its own transliteration. It's poor to uselessness, in my
        experience. (I've only tried it with Japanese hiragana; that's an easy
        translit, though it does need some context.)

        > Konqueror does the same when its default display is iso-8859-1 but I'm less
        > sure of that. Yesterday I sent a Unicode mail with a sentence in Esperanto
        > and got it back quoted in some non-unicode reply mail from the US with the
        > circumflexes stripped but the letters otherwise OK. Just haphazard symptoms,

        Lots of mailers break encodings in quoting; it's the mailer's fault.
        It happens with all encodings.

        > as you see. Maybe I shoulda kept silent.

        Chime in all you want; it's a public list. :) There's just enough fear
        of incompatibility on this list that I'm trying to keep any new false
        ones from forming ...

        --
        Glenn Maynard
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