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Re: Failed to drag&drop-open a file with wide-chars in its filename

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  • Tony Mechelynck
    On Jun 19, 11:22 pm, björn wrote: [...] ... The OP s problem was about a file with 한 as (part of) the filename, not as the
    Message 1 of 12 , Jun 20, 2009
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      On Jun 19, 11:22 pm, björn <bjorn.winck...@...> wrote:
      [...]
      > I'm afraid I know way too little about text rendering to fix this, so
      > until somebody else fixes it in core Vim the problem will remain.  I
      > would highly suggest that you take up the rendering problem on the
      > vim_dev mailing list (just send a text file with 한 as the content and
      > ask why it renders as three glyphs).
      >
      > Sorry,
      > Björn

      The OP's problem was about a file with 한 as (part of) the filename,
      not as the content.

      I'm on Linux, so what I see may be different from what you see on
      MacVim; but in gvim I see 한 (when in the content of a file) as one
      glyph (U+D55C, corresponding to three bytes, hex ED 95 9C). Are you
      sure you have 'encoding' correctly set? (I use utf-8).


      Best regards,
      Tony.
      --
      Swipple's Rule of Order:
      He who shouts the loudest has the floor.

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    • björn
      ... Hi Andrew, As far as I can tell (from searching around) HFS+ always uses normalization form D (NFD) for filenames. So as a workaround for the issue the OP
      Message 2 of 12 , Jun 23, 2009
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        2009/6/21 Andrew Dunbar:
        > 2009/6/20 Tony Mechelynck:
        >> On 20/06/09 19:58, björn wrote:
        >>>
        >>> I tried it myself on Linux and had the same problem and realized that
        >>> the problem has to do with how you represent 한.  If done as you
        >>> suggest with U+D55C it works (both Linux and MacVim), but if
        >>> represented by U+1112, U+1161, U+11AB then Vim will render it as three
        >>> glyphs but here the Cocoa text system combines these into one glyph
        >>> and that is where the problem in MacVim appears.  (By the way: MacVim
        >>> defaults to use utf-8 for 'encoding'.)
        >>
        >> Ah, I see. I entered it in Vim by copy-paste from your previous post in
        >> the vim_mac Google Group page in my browser.
        >>
        >> Vim is obviously unaware of hangul jamo decomposition / recomposition
        >> and IIUC will render each of them as one glyph. I'm not sure how to have
        >> them be treated as "one spacing + (in this case) 2 composing characters"
        >> though IIUC it would be "the right way" to do it.
        >
        > Hangul jamo (de)composition is part of Unicode normalization. Do we know
        > if OS X does Unicode for all characters or just for Korean? I suspect it is
        > done for all characters to prevent two identical looking filenames which differ
        > only in Unicode normalization. A good language to test this with would be
        > Vietnamese which uses Latin script with up to three "accents" per character.
        >
        > Unicode normalization might be a feature of the HFS+ filesystem as there is
        > a general problem in computing of encodings vs. filesystems.

        Hi Andrew,

        As far as I can tell (from searching around) HFS+ always uses
        normalization form D (NFD) for filenames. So as a workaround for the
        issue the OP had I now normalize filenames to compatibility form C
        (NFKC) before passing the filename on to Vim and this takes care of
        the OP's problem.

        However, as I see it this really is a legitimate issue in Vim itself
        in that it does not handle NFD properly (the example above should
        always render as one glyph, not three as it does now if NFD is used).
        Either Vim should ensure that all buffers are normalized to composed
        form NFC/NFKC or it needs to be made "NFD aware". Does anybody on the
        vim_multibyte list (this mail goes to vim_mac as well) have any
        comments on this?

        Björn

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      • John (Eljay) Love-Jensen
        Hi Björn, ... HFS+ uses a variant of NFD for filenames. (The HFS+ variant predates standardizatoin of NFD.) This requirement is enforced by the OS.
        Message 3 of 12 , Jun 23, 2009
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          Hi Björn,

          > As far as I can tell (from searching around) HFS+ always uses
          > normalization form D (NFD) for filenames.

          HFS+ uses a variant of NFD for filenames. (The HFS+ variant predates
          standardizatoin of NFD.) This requirement is enforced by the OS.

          http://developer.apple.com/technotes/tn/tn1150.html
          http://developer.apple.com/technotes/tn/tn1150table.html
          http://developer.apple.com/qa/qa2001/qa1235.html
          http://www.unicode.org/reports/tr15/

          Windows uses NFC for filenames. I'm not sure if the Linux world settled on
          NFC or NFK.

          Amiga OS (at least the one I used) is ECMA 94 Latin 1 based (precursor to
          ISO 8859-1).

          > So as a workaround for the issue the OP had I now normalize filenames
          > to compatibility form C (NFKC) before passing the filename on to Vim
          > and this takes care of the OP's problem.

          NFC or NFKC? Those are different normalizations.

          Windows NTFS file system uses NFC. But it isn't enforced by the OS, yet.

          > However, as I see it this really is a legitimate issue in Vim itself
          > in that it does not handle NFD properly (the example above should
          > always render as one glyph, not three as it does now if NFD is used).
          > Either Vim should ensure that all buffers are normalized to composed
          > form NFC/NFKC or it needs to be made "NFD aware".

          I agree with your assessment.

          > Does anybody on the vim_multibyte list (this mail goes to vim_mac as
          > well) have any comments on this?

          The relevant Mac OS X routine APIs are:

          CFURLRef url =
          CFURLCreateWithFileSystemPath(
          kCFAllocatorDefault,
          cfstringFullPath,
          kCFURLPOSIXPathStyle,
          false));

          char bufferUTF8[32768*4]; // Worst case scenario.
          // As per Apple documentation, paths can be "up to 30,000 UTF-16
          // encoding units long", with each component being up to 255 UTF-16
          // encoding units long. Too bad there isn't an API to specify the
          // exact buffer size /a priori/.

          Boolean success =
          CFURLGetFileSystemRepresentation(
          url,
          true,
          &bufferUTF8[0],
          sizeof bufferUTF8);

          Sincerely,
          --Eljay


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        • John (Eljay) Love-Jensen
          ... I meant: ... NFC or NFD. Fat fingers. --Eljay --~--~---------~--~----~------------~-------~--~----~ You received this message from the vim_multibyte
          Message 4 of 12 , Jun 23, 2009
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            > Windows uses NFC for filenames. I'm not sure if the Linux world settled on
            > NFC or NFK.

            I meant: ... NFC or NFD.

            Fat fingers.

            --Eljay


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          • Andrew Dunbar
            ... When I worked on AbiWord a few years ago Linux left filename encoding up to the filesystem and the user. This may have changed since... Linux supports many
            Message 5 of 12 , Jun 23, 2009
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              2009/6/23 John (Eljay) Love-Jensen <eljay@...>:
              >
              > Hi Björn,
              >
              >> As far as I can tell (from searching around) HFS+ always uses
              >> normalization form D (NFD) for filenames.
              >
              > HFS+ uses a variant of NFD for filenames.  (The HFS+ variant predates
              > standardizatoin of NFD.)  This requirement is enforced by the OS.
              >
              > http://developer.apple.com/technotes/tn/tn1150.html
              > http://developer.apple.com/technotes/tn/tn1150table.html
              > http://developer.apple.com/qa/qa2001/qa1235.html
              > http://www.unicode.org/reports/tr15/
              >
              > Windows uses NFC for filenames.  I'm not sure if the Linux world settled on
              > NFC or NFK.

              When I worked on AbiWord a few years ago Linux left filename encoding
              up to the filesystem and the user. This may have changed since...

              Linux supports many filesystems including Windows and Mac filesystems.
              For filesystems which mandate a specific encoding Linux should follow
              those rules. For older filesystems the encoding would generally be the
              encoding of the OS but... Linux as Unix is a multisuer OS and may have
              various users using various languages in various encodings. Each user
              gets to decide their language and encoding through enviroment
              variables such as LANG, LC_ALL, LC_COLLATE etc. These vary by vintage
              of the OS and may well vary for other Unixes too such as FreeBSD.

              I think Linux generally uses extN filesytems as default. When I was
              last working with it that was ext2 but ext3 has now been in use for
              some time and ext4 is the current iteration which may or may not be in
              general release. The ext3 or ext4 filesystems may mandate an encoding
              that ext2 did not.

              The general soltion for the Unix/Linux world may be to honour the
              user's locale settings and assume that the filesystem software will
              convert to any specifically mandated encoding it requires when you
              call the standard open() etc APIs.

              But further research is definitely recommended!

              Andrew Dunbar.


              > Amiga OS (at least the one I used) is ECMA 94 Latin 1 based (precursor to
              > ISO 8859-1).
              >
              >> So as a workaround for the issue the OP had I now normalize filenames
              >> to compatibility form C (NFKC) before passing the filename on to Vim
              >> and this takes care of the OP's problem.
              >
              > NFC or NFKC?  Those are different normalizations.
              >
              > Windows NTFS file system uses NFC.  But it isn't enforced by the OS, yet.
              >
              >> However, as I see it this really is a legitimate issue in Vim itself
              >> in that it does not handle NFD properly (the example above should
              >> always render as one glyph, not three as it does now if NFD is used).
              >> Either Vim should ensure that all buffers are normalized to composed
              >> form NFC/NFKC or it needs to be made "NFD aware".
              >
              > I agree with your assessment.
              >
              >> Does anybody on the vim_multibyte list (this mail goes to vim_mac as
              >> well) have any comments on this?
              >
              > The relevant Mac OS X routine APIs are:
              >
              > CFURLRef url =
              > CFURLCreateWithFileSystemPath(
              >  kCFAllocatorDefault,
              >  cfstringFullPath,
              >  kCFURLPOSIXPathStyle,
              >  false));
              >
              > char bufferUTF8[32768*4]; // Worst case scenario.
              > // As per Apple documentation, paths can be "up to 30,000 UTF-16
              > // encoding units long", with each component being up to 255 UTF-16
              > // encoding units long.  Too bad there isn't an API to specify the
              > // exact buffer size /a priori/.
              >
              > Boolean success =
              > CFURLGetFileSystemRepresentation(
              >  url,
              >  true,
              >  &bufferUTF8[0],
              >  sizeof bufferUTF8);
              >
              > Sincerely,
              > --Eljay
              >
              >
              > >
              >



              --
              http://wiktionarydev.leuksman.com http://linguaphile.sf.net

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            • Nico Weber
              ... I m pretty sure it hasn t. As far as I know, for linux a filename is just a bunch of bytes, and you only need to know the encoding for lesser tasks such as
              Message 6 of 12 , Jun 23, 2009
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                >> Windows uses NFC for filenames. I'm not sure if the Linux world
                >> settled on
                >> NFC or NFK.
                >
                > When I worked on AbiWord a few years ago Linux left filename encoding
                > up to the filesystem and the user. This may have changed since...


                I'm pretty sure it hasn't. As far as I know, for linux a filename is
                just a bunch of bytes, and you only need to know the encoding for
                lesser tasks such as file name display anyway ;-) In that case, the
                recommended way is to get the encoding from an env var.

                Nico

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              • björn
                Hi Eljay, ... Thanks for clarifying that (and for the links!). ... I read that Windows uses NFKC. Have you got a reference for the claim that NFC is used? ...
                Message 7 of 12 , Jun 24, 2009
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                  Hi Eljay,

                  2009/6/23 John (Eljay) Love-Jensen:
                  >
                  >> As far as I can tell (from searching around) HFS+ always uses
                  >> normalization form D (NFD) for filenames.
                  >
                  > HFS+ uses a variant of NFD for filenames.  (The HFS+ variant predates
                  > standardizatoin of NFD.)  This requirement is enforced by the OS.
                  >
                  > http://developer.apple.com/technotes/tn/tn1150.html
                  > http://developer.apple.com/technotes/tn/tn1150table.html
                  > http://developer.apple.com/qa/qa2001/qa1235.html
                  > http://www.unicode.org/reports/tr15/

                  Thanks for clarifying that (and for the links!).

                  > Windows uses NFC for filenames.  I'm not sure if the Linux world settled on
                  > NFC or NFK.

                  I read that Windows uses NFKC. Have you got a reference for the claim
                  that NFC is used?

                  >> So as a workaround for the issue the OP had I now normalize filenames
                  >> to compatibility form C (NFKC) before passing the filename on to Vim
                  >> and this takes care of the OP's problem.
                  >
                  > NFC or NFKC?  Those are different normalizations.
                  >
                  > Windows NTFS file system uses NFC.  But it isn't enforced by the OS, yet.

                  I did mean the compatibility form NFKC since I read somewhere that
                  NTFS uses NFKC, but I did not research that very carefully.


                  >> However, as I see it this really is a legitimate issue in Vim itself
                  >> in that it does not handle NFD properly (the example above should
                  >> always render as one glyph, not three as it does now if NFD is used).
                  >> Either Vim should ensure that all buffers are normalized to composed
                  >> form NFC/NFKC or it needs to be made "NFD aware".
                  >
                  > I agree with your assessment.
                  >
                  >> Does anybody on the vim_multibyte list (this mail goes to vim_mac as
                  >> well) have any comments on this?
                  >
                  > The relevant Mac OS X routine APIs are:
                  >
                  > CFURLRef url =
                  > CFURLCreateWithFileSystemPath(
                  >  kCFAllocatorDefault,
                  >  cfstringFullPath,
                  >  kCFURLPOSIXPathStyle,
                  >  false));
                  >
                  > char bufferUTF8[32768*4]; // Worst case scenario.
                  > // As per Apple documentation, paths can be "up to 30,000 UTF-16
                  > // encoding units long", with each component being up to 255 UTF-16
                  > // encoding units long.  Too bad there isn't an API to specify the
                  > // exact buffer size /a priori/.
                  >
                  > Boolean success =
                  > CFURLGetFileSystemRepresentation(
                  >  url,
                  >  true,
                  >  &bufferUTF8[0],
                  >  sizeof bufferUTF8);

                  Thanks. NSString has a method called fileSystemRepresentation which
                  I'm guessing does the same thing(?). I used the NSString method
                  precomposedStringWithCompatibilityMapping to convert to NFKC.

                  Björn

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                • John (Eljay) Love-Jensen
                  Hi Björn, ... Drat, I cannot find the MSDN reference. Maybe my memory has failed me. NFKC is lossy. NFC is non-lossy. Perhaps you are remembering the
                  Message 8 of 12 , Jun 24, 2009
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                    Hi Björn,

                    > I read that Windows uses NFKC. Have you got a reference for the claim
                    > that NFC is used?

                    Drat, I cannot find the MSDN reference. Maybe my memory has failed me.

                    NFKC is lossy. NFC is non-lossy.

                    Perhaps you are remembering the security information:
                    http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dd374047(VS.85).aspx#SC_Unicode

                    File Names, Paths, and Namespaces information is here:
                    http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/aa365247(VS.85).aspx

                    Note that modern UNC (starts with "\\?\" (for paths) or with "\\.\" (for
                    volumes) -- such as "\\?\C:\Dir\Sub\File.ext", and up to 32,767 UTF-16
                    encoding units (Vista), or UCS-2 characters (XP), using 16-bit encoding of
                    Unicode) is different from older "short" UNC (DOS-era limit of 260 8-bit
                    characters dependent on the OS code page setting).

                    The NFC is mentioned here in a MSDN blog:
                    http://blogs.msdn.com/michkap/archive/2006/12/07/1232365.aspx

                    But I don't consider that canonical, since it was in a blog feedback
                    comment.

                    I asked for clarification on the MSDN "File Names, Paths, and Namespaces"
                    page, in the comments section.

                    NOTE: "short" UNC and "old" DOS style has to abide by the OS code page
                    setting. Even when using the FooW routines and wchar_t (16-bit) paths.

                    > Thanks. NSString has a method called fileSystemRepresentation which
                    > I'm guessing does the same thing(?). I used the NSString method
                    > precomposedStringWithCompatibilityMapping to convert to NFKC.

                    I presume so. My Cocoa experience is not as extensive as my Carbon
                    experience.

                    Sincerely,
                    --Eljay


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                  • Tony Mechelynck
                    ... Hm, NFKC and NFKD sometimes fuse slightly different glyphs into a single normalized form. For instance, NFKC(²) = 2, though both are (different) Latin1
                    Message 9 of 12 , Jun 24, 2009
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                      On 24/06/09 14:00, björn wrote:
                      >
                      > Hi Eljay,
                      >
                      > 2009/6/23 John (Eljay) Love-Jensen:
                      >>
                      >>> As far as I can tell (from searching around) HFS+ always uses
                      >>> normalization form D (NFD) for filenames.
                      >>
                      >> HFS+ uses a variant of NFD for filenames. (The HFS+ variant predates
                      >> standardizatoin of NFD.) This requirement is enforced by the OS.
                      >>
                      >> http://developer.apple.com/technotes/tn/tn1150.html
                      >> http://developer.apple.com/technotes/tn/tn1150table.html
                      >> http://developer.apple.com/qa/qa2001/qa1235.html
                      >> http://www.unicode.org/reports/tr15/
                      >
                      > Thanks for clarifying that (and for the links!).
                      >
                      >> Windows uses NFC for filenames. I'm not sure if the Linux world settled on
                      >> NFC or NFK.
                      >
                      > I read that Windows uses NFKC. Have you got a reference for the claim
                      > that NFC is used?
                      >
                      >>> So as a workaround for the issue the OP had I now normalize filenames
                      >>> to compatibility form C (NFKC) before passing the filename on to Vim
                      >>> and this takes care of the OP's problem.
                      >>
                      >> NFC or NFKC? Those are different normalizations.
                      >>
                      >> Windows NTFS file system uses NFC. But it isn't enforced by the OS, yet.
                      >
                      > I did mean the compatibility form NFKC since I read somewhere that
                      > NTFS uses NFKC, but I did not research that very carefully.
                      >
                      >
                      >>> However, as I see it this really is a legitimate issue in Vim itself
                      >>> in that it does not handle NFD properly (the example above should
                      >>> always render as one glyph, not three as it does now if NFD is used).
                      >>> Either Vim should ensure that all buffers are normalized to composed
                      >>> form NFC/NFKC or it needs to be made "NFD aware".
                      >>
                      >> I agree with your assessment.
                      >>
                      >>> Does anybody on the vim_multibyte list (this mail goes to vim_mac as
                      >>> well) have any comments on this?
                      >>
                      >> The relevant Mac OS X routine APIs are:
                      >>
                      >> CFURLRef url =
                      >> CFURLCreateWithFileSystemPath(
                      >> kCFAllocatorDefault,
                      >> cfstringFullPath,
                      >> kCFURLPOSIXPathStyle,
                      >> false));
                      >>
                      >> char bufferUTF8[32768*4]; // Worst case scenario.
                      >> // As per Apple documentation, paths can be "up to 30,000 UTF-16
                      >> // encoding units long", with each component being up to 255 UTF-16
                      >> // encoding units long. Too bad there isn't an API to specify the
                      >> // exact buffer size /a priori/.
                      >>
                      >> Boolean success =
                      >> CFURLGetFileSystemRepresentation(
                      >> url,
                      >> true,
                      >> &bufferUTF8[0],
                      >> sizeof bufferUTF8);
                      >
                      > Thanks. NSString has a method called fileSystemRepresentation which
                      > I'm guessing does the same thing(?). I used the NSString method
                      > precomposedStringWithCompatibilityMapping to convert to NFKC.
                      >
                      > Björn

                      Hm, NFKC and NFKD sometimes fuse slightly different glyphs into a single
                      "normalized" form. For instance, NFKC(²) = 2, though both are
                      (different) Latin1 characters (0xB2 and 0x32). IIRC, DOS would have kept
                      them distinct.

                      Best regards,
                      Tony.
                      --
                      hundred-and-one symptoms of being an internet addict:
                      56. You leave the modem speaker on after connecting because you think it
                      sounds like the ocean wind...the perfect soundtrack for "surfing
                      the net".

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