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Re: Two encoding problems

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  • Mike Williams
    ... It is still a vim todo to be able to print multiple character sets in one file. While Unicode has come up with a single encoding, the issue of printing
    Message 1 of 13 , Mar 22, 2004
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      On 22 Mar 2004 at 6:27, Tony Mechelynck wrote:

      > Thanks for drawing my attention to the 'printfont' option (which
      > works on my system and is set to "Courier_New:h10"). But I don't
      > think that, without a functional 'printencoding', it will help me
      > print a file in UTF-8 with mixed Latin, Cyrillic and Arabic
      > characters on a printer which, AFAIK, understands only graphics or
      > cp1252 text (e.g. the file
      > http://users.skynet.be/antoine.mechelynck/index.htm ).

      It is still a vim todo to be able to print multiple character sets in
      one file. While Unicode has come up with a single encoding, the
      issue of printing very large character reportoires is a much harder
      issue usually achieved by switching fonts with different encodings.

      > Actually, I got the wrong end of the stick too. To avoid hollow
      > boxes I must "send TT as graphics" instead of the default "send TT
      > as bitmaps". In any case, IIUC, the idea is to bypass the printer
      > fonts completely (which is slower but safer I suppose) when
      > printing text that might include "exotic" characters like the
      > accented consonants of Esperanto (c, g, h, j, s with circumflex and
      > u with breve).

      Using send TT as graphics gets around the problem of missing or
      mismatched fonts on a printer. In a way cheaper printers with
      Windows are more predictable since Windows will alwys pre-raster text
      and you always get what you see on screen. Using GhostScript to pre-
      raster PostScript files before sending them to the printer is the
      same thing really.

      The only other reliable method is to include a copy (possibly a
      subset) of the font in the data sent to the printer, but that
      requires a more expensive printer with an embedded font interpreter
      and that then just opens up another Pandora's box of issues.

      TTFN

      Mike
      --
      Laugh, and the world ignores you. Crying doesn't help either.
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