Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: Patch for multibyte printing (long)

Expand Messages
  • Mike Williams
    ... I don t have my reference to hand but each country has it s own national character set standard for the one byte code range, which is similar to the ASCII
    Message 1 of 3 , Jan 20, 2004
    View Source
    • 0 Attachment
      On 19 Jan 2004 at 17:18, Glenn Maynard wrote:

      > On which systems does the "ASCII range" differ, other than Japanese Windows
      > systems having a broken backslash? There are probably a couple more that
      > I'm not aware of, but it's definitely not normal at all for ASCII codepoints
      > to deviate; it's exceptional (albeit an important exception that must be
      > dealt with).

      I don't have my reference to hand but each country has it's own
      national character set standard for the one byte code range, which is
      similar to the ASCII character set but can differ in a couple of
      characters.

      For the example you give, the Japanese standard defines a Yen symbol
      for the code 0x5c which is a backslash in ASCII (is this what you
      mean by broken?) and an overline (a high horizontal line) in place of
      a tilde. Another example is with Simplified Chines where ASCII code
      for the dollar is used for the yuan.

      These slight differences can cause problems when printing files that
      are dependent on the US-ASCII character set - such as Perl or PHP
      (especially on Windows!). It is a simple option to let the user
      force the use of US-ASCII for one byte characters in this case.
      Perhaps, what I should do is allow for this to be done without having
      to use Courier as well. I'll have a look.

      TTFN

      Mike
      --
      I is a uni student.
    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.