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Re: osx.iusethis.com

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  • Ash Berlin
    ... Indeed, that is very useful. $ mvim --servername DIR1 --remote-silent DIR1/foo.c $ mvim --servername DIR1 --remote-silent DIR1/bar.c $ mvim --servername
    Message 1 of 8 , Feb 6, 2010
      On Feb 4, 9:19 pm, björn <bjorn.winck...@...> wrote:
      > > I use vim on OS X. I do not use MacVim. I use gvim under X11. Until I can
      > > (easily) have multiple (OS, not vim) windows open under MacVim,
      >
      > Now I'm confused: what is difficult about having multiple (OS) windows
      > open in MacVim?  How can I make it easier?
      >
      > > and an easy
      > > way to alias opening them from the commandline, it isn't better than gvim
      > > for my purposes. But I keep watching and waiting.
      >
      > Are you aware of the --remote flag?  It lets you specify which (OS)
      > window to open a file in from the command line  (the name to pass to
      > the flag is something like VIM or VIM1 -- it is the rightmost word in
      > the window title by default).  Or where you looking for something
      > else?
      >
      > Björn

      Indeed, that is very useful.

      $ mvim --servername DIR1 --remote-silent DIR1/foo.c
      $ mvim --servername DIR1 --remote-silent DIR1/bar.c
      $ mvim --servername DIR2 --remote-silent DIR2/quxx.c

      Gives two windows. Perhaps all that is needed is a nice wrapper script
      or alias around that. Personally I have :e aliases in my shell to
      'mvim --remote-silent' currently, so for me

      $ :e --servername DIR1 DIR1/foo.c

      works. Fantastic.

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