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Re: osx.iusethis.com

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  • Seth Milliken
    On Feb 4, 12:57 pm, Gregory Seidman wrote: ... Are you not using the mvim script that comes with MacVim? With the Enable
    Message 1 of 8 , Feb 5, 2010
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      On Feb 4, 12:57 pm, Gregory Seidman <gsslist+...@...>
      wrote:
      ....
      > I use vim on OS X. I do not use MacVim. I use gvim under X11. Until I can
      > (easily) have multiple (OS, not vim) windows open under MacVim, and an easy
      > way to alias opening them from the commandline, it isn't better than gvim
      > for my purposes. But I keep watching and waiting.

      Are you not using the mvim script that comes with MacVim? With the
      "Enable Quickstart" option selected in the Advanced preferences pane,
      new windows open very quickly.

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    • Seth Milliken
      On Feb 4, 12:57 pm, Gregory Seidman wrote: ... Are you not using the mvim script that comes with MacVim? With the Enable
      Message 2 of 8 , Feb 5, 2010
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        On Feb 4, 12:57 pm, Gregory Seidman <gsslist+...@...>
        wrote:
        ....
        > I use vim on OS X. I do not use MacVim. I use gvim under X11. Until I can
        > (easily) have multiple (OS, not vim) windows open under MacVim, and an easy
        > way to alias opening them from the commandline, it isn't better than gvim
        > for my purposes. But I keep watching and waiting.

        Are you not using the mvim script that comes with MacVim? With the
        "Enable Quickstart" option selected in the Advanced preferences pane,
        new windows open very quickly.

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      • Ash Berlin
        ... Indeed, that is very useful. $ mvim --servername DIR1 --remote-silent DIR1/foo.c $ mvim --servername DIR1 --remote-silent DIR1/bar.c $ mvim --servername
        Message 3 of 8 , Feb 6, 2010
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          On Feb 4, 9:19 pm, björn <bjorn.winck...@...> wrote:
          > > I use vim on OS X. I do not use MacVim. I use gvim under X11. Until I can
          > > (easily) have multiple (OS, not vim) windows open under MacVim,
          >
          > Now I'm confused: what is difficult about having multiple (OS) windows
          > open in MacVim?  How can I make it easier?
          >
          > > and an easy
          > > way to alias opening them from the commandline, it isn't better than gvim
          > > for my purposes. But I keep watching and waiting.
          >
          > Are you aware of the --remote flag?  It lets you specify which (OS)
          > window to open a file in from the command line  (the name to pass to
          > the flag is something like VIM or VIM1 -- it is the rightmost word in
          > the window title by default).  Or where you looking for something
          > else?
          >
          > Björn

          Indeed, that is very useful.

          $ mvim --servername DIR1 --remote-silent DIR1/foo.c
          $ mvim --servername DIR1 --remote-silent DIR1/bar.c
          $ mvim --servername DIR2 --remote-silent DIR2/quxx.c

          Gives two windows. Perhaps all that is needed is a nice wrapper script
          or alias around that. Personally I have :e aliases in my shell to
          'mvim --remote-silent' currently, so for me

          $ :e --servername DIR1 DIR1/foo.c

          works. Fantastic.

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