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Re: [videoblogging] regularity, threads, terse

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  • Deirdre Straughan
    On Sun, 27 Mar 2005 22:37:17 +0200, Andreas Haugstrup ... It s been a self-reinforcing loop in popular media. Old Hollywood musicals, for example, would spend
    Message 1 of 40 , Mar 31 2:02 AM
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      On Sun, 27 Mar 2005 22:37:17 +0200, Andreas Haugstrup
      <videoblog@...> wrote:

      > It's not the fault of the mainstream media (though they may carry some of
      > the blame), it's your fault, and my fault and the rest of society's fault.
      > It's us that want soundbites and quick resumes because time has become a
      > commodity. The mainstream media has adapted to what the market wants, so
      > don't blame them. Blame your neighbour.

      It's been a self-reinforcing loop in popular media. Old Hollywood
      musicals, for example, would spend 6, 8, 10 minutes on a production
      number and even, f'godsake, an overture and an intermission with
      music! Modern movies, even the few musicals there are, are a lot
      shorter and move a lot faster, partly in response to a visual culture
      where everything moves faster. Anyone here remember when MTV first
      showed up? Music videos were very new and different in style from
      anything we'd seen before. Now that quick-cutting style is common
      across all video. Worse, we are now expected to deal with news
      programs in which we're watching video while being assaulted by
      various sidebars and tickers carrying other information. Frankly, I
      can't take multitasking quite THAT far.

      A friend of mine grew up fairly normally in the US, but never watched
      much TV, her family culture was more oriented to classical music and
      opera. She watched Disney's Aladdin at my house with my daughter, and
      was baffled by it - it simply moved a lot faster than she was used to,
      and some sequences she couldn't follow at all. A matter of training.

      > There are still a range of
      > newspapers who does a very good job of providing the insight you miss
      > (newspapers are well suited for that kind of stuff, websites as well). So
      > stop watching Fox News and buy a good paper. :o)

      The Economist does even better than dailies - they actually take a
      week or so to think things over before writing about them.

      --
      best regards,
      Deirdré Straughan
      www.straughan.com
    • Deirdre Straughan
      On Sun, 27 Mar 2005 22:37:17 +0200, Andreas Haugstrup ... It s been a self-reinforcing loop in popular media. Old Hollywood musicals, for example, would spend
      Message 40 of 40 , Mar 31 2:02 AM
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        On Sun, 27 Mar 2005 22:37:17 +0200, Andreas Haugstrup
        <videoblog@...> wrote:

        > It's not the fault of the mainstream media (though they may carry some of
        > the blame), it's your fault, and my fault and the rest of society's fault.
        > It's us that want soundbites and quick resumes because time has become a
        > commodity. The mainstream media has adapted to what the market wants, so
        > don't blame them. Blame your neighbour.

        It's been a self-reinforcing loop in popular media. Old Hollywood
        musicals, for example, would spend 6, 8, 10 minutes on a production
        number and even, f'godsake, an overture and an intermission with
        music! Modern movies, even the few musicals there are, are a lot
        shorter and move a lot faster, partly in response to a visual culture
        where everything moves faster. Anyone here remember when MTV first
        showed up? Music videos were very new and different in style from
        anything we'd seen before. Now that quick-cutting style is common
        across all video. Worse, we are now expected to deal with news
        programs in which we're watching video while being assaulted by
        various sidebars and tickers carrying other information. Frankly, I
        can't take multitasking quite THAT far.

        A friend of mine grew up fairly normally in the US, but never watched
        much TV, her family culture was more oriented to classical music and
        opera. She watched Disney's Aladdin at my house with my daughter, and
        was baffled by it - it simply moved a lot faster than she was used to,
        and some sequences she couldn't follow at all. A matter of training.

        > There are still a range of
        > newspapers who does a very good job of providing the insight you miss
        > (newspapers are well suited for that kind of stuff, websites as well). So
        > stop watching Fox News and buy a good paper. :o)

        The Economist does even better than dailies - they actually take a
        week or so to think things over before writing about them.

        --
        best regards,
        Deirdré Straughan
        www.straughan.com
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