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Re: How To Make Money With Your Videos

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  • compumavengal
    Jay, as one of the main yackers in that war I appreciate the memory of some of those debates. I guess what I would want to say to Michael is that there isn t
    Message 1 of 9 , May 1, 2011
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      Jay, as one of the main yackers in that war I appreciate the memory of some of those debates. I guess what I would want to say to Michael is that there isn't one legitimate way of producing quality video or content for media devices.

      I see no reason to emulate a failing infrastructure. Yes, quality produced videos are important. Telling the story effectively, very important.

      But many of us learned long ago we didn't need to be sanctified and be grateful for 10% of the earnings and 100% of the aggravation.

      I'm 53 years old. How long must I wait for intelligent programming from the networks that address my interests?

      There are folks building communities and profits using video as an adjunct to their main business. They are doing fine in their pj's.

      There are folks experimenting with visual effects videos after they come home from their day job. The studios need to be scared.

      There are web series and podcasts not connected with the networks that have money rolling in and they don't have to split it with anyone.

      Google TV is quietly looking for content. Yes some of it will come from the prior networks but not near enough for those who don't want lowest common denominator television.

      For those that want to advanced to the professional/prosumer level and don't want to be up the ying yang in debt your workshops could be a viable option.

      In conclusion, don't hate on women editing in their pajamas.
      Embrace the silk baby.

      Gena

      --- In videoblogging@yahoogroups.com, Jay dedman <jay.dedman@...> wrote:
      >
      > > Want to move your online video up a notch?
      > > NATPE (National Association of Television Producers and Executives) is
      > > running a 2-day conference on how to pitch your work to the LA studios
      > > and networks
      > > Pitchcon
      > > If you want to get serious this is the place to do it.
      > > I posted Pitchcon on my blog this morning
      > > http://www.nyvs.com/blog/user/michael/How-To-Make-A-Living-With-Your-Video-Camera
      > > Michael Rosenblum
      > > President & CEO
      > > RosenblumTV
      > > Michael@...
      >
      > Michael--
      >
      > I understand your history of running workshops for prosumers and for
      > media professionals. I remember when you set up that little shop in
      > Manhattan down on Bowery back in the early days (2003?) selling
      > classes to people wanting to learn how to shoot on Canon XL-1's and
      > edit with FCP. We briefly talked one afternoon. I believe the whole
      > pitch was that people could make a TV segment, magazine style, that
      > ABC (your old network) would buy? Wish the networks actually had been
      > into that idea. Then people learned to just go around the networks.
      >
      > If you knew the history of this group, we started out really pushing
      > personal storytelling. Many of us were more into the obnoxious punk,
      > public access scene of personal video. Dont make a 3-minute "news
      > story" that would need some invisible executive to approve of before
      > it gets shown. Instead make the craziest and/or mundane clip of your
      > life and throw it up there. Make a lot of them. The blog itself would
      > become the documentary of your life. I know the early tone of being
      > against ads or formatting your videos for commercial purposes made a
      > lot of people angry. There are long long threads around this debate.
      > Search "Rocketboom" in the archives circa 2004/2005.
      >
      > Then Youtube came along to make online video normal and easy. Many
      > folks on this list started getting video gigs, careers. Some just
      > added video into their current positions. Some here have started
      > teaching at university. Some built online video companies. Some are
      > making money with ads on shows. Some have continued to document their
      > lives in video and will have the most awesome video history ever.
      > Those videos will be gold to their grandkids. Im glad personal
      > storytelling is alive and well.
      >
      > So http://www.pitchcon.org/ fits right in with how all these things
      > are evolving. A conference to teach you how to pitch your online web
      > series to Hollywood. Right? $395 for early bird registration seems
      > really high. I know I could never afford that. And it does make me
      > cringe thinking people might be drawn back in to asking permission
      > from gatekeepers to make their show. Just make the show if that's
      > where your creativity is bubbling, put it on blip or Youtube, and
      > throw on ads. Supposedly the successful shows are making tens of
      > thousands of dollars a year.
      >
      > Ive known David Lee King for a long time online. He really pioneered
      > shooting, editing, uploading on the iPhone right as it came out. So
      > incredible that you can do this. All the video coming out of the
      > revolutions in the Middle East and elsewhere give testimony to this
      > kind of storytelling and videomaking. Total punk rock. These kind of
      > simple videos are literally changing human history. But we all have to
      > make living somehow after we take down the dictators.
      >
      > Anyway this list has been real quiet the past couple years. Been a
      > long time since we've had a good flame war over money. I miss
      > everyone!
      >
      > Jay
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > --
      > 917 371 6790
      > 540 860 0673
      >
    • Jim Turner
      Gena that is such a great response. Networks SHOULD be scared, and this is probably why they are allowing this type of gathering. They have to catch rising
      Message 2 of 9 , May 1, 2011
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        Gena that is such a great response. Networks SHOULD be scared, and this is
        probably why they are allowing this type of gathering. They have to catch
        rising stars and others.

        I have a friend and now client that produced the Golden Girls and Laverne
        and Shirley and other shows and is not interested in pitching his new
        project to the networks but pitching it to the online world. He sees far
        more power in the ability to control his own message and doing it using the
        tools that are lower in price than agents, executives and old ways.

        The only problem at this point is the networks and others represent much
        larger pies. tens of thousands to some in the networks is the amount of
        money they spend on office supplies. We need to tip the balance of content
        and pay.

        Thanks for inspiring me tonight.


        Jim

        On Sun, May 1, 2011 at 5:30 PM, compumavengal
        <compumavengal@...>wrote:

        >
        >
        > Jay, as one of the main yackers in that war I appreciate the memory of some
        > of those debates. I guess what I would want to say to Michael is that there
        > isn't one legitimate way of producing quality video or content for media
        > devices.
        >
        > I see no reason to emulate a failing infrastructure. Yes, quality produced
        > videos are important. Telling the story effectively, very important.
        >
        > But many of us learned long ago we didn't need to be sanctified and be
        > grateful for 10% of the earnings and 100% of the aggravation.
        >
        > I'm 53 years old. How long must I wait for intelligent programming from the
        > networks that address my interests?
        >
        > There are folks building communities and profits using video as an adjunct
        > to their main business. They are doing fine in their pj's.
        >
        > There are folks experimenting with visual effects videos after they come
        > home from their day job. The studios need to be scared.
        >
        > There are web series and podcasts not connected with the networks that have
        > money rolling in and they don't have to split it with anyone.
        >
        > Google TV is quietly looking for content. Yes some of it will come from the
        > prior networks but not near enough for those who don't want lowest common
        > denominator television.
        >
        > For those that want to advanced to the professional/prosumer level and
        > don't want to be up the ying yang in debt your workshops could be a viable
        > option.
        >
        > In conclusion, don't hate on women editing in their pajamas.
        > Embrace the silk baby.
        >
        > Gena
        >
        > --- In videoblogging@yahoogroups.com, Jay dedman <jay.dedman@...> wrote:
        > >
        > > > Want to move your online video up a notch?
        > > > NATPE (National Association of Television Producers and Executives) is
        > > > running a 2-day conference on how to pitch your work to the LA studios
        > > > and networks
        > > > Pitchcon
        > > > If you want to get serious this is the place to do it.
        > > > I posted Pitchcon on my blog this morning
        > > >
        > http://www.nyvs.com/blog/user/michael/How-To-Make-A-Living-With-Your-Video-Camera
        > > > Michael Rosenblum
        > > > President & CEO
        > > > RosenblumTV
        > > > Michael@...
        > >
        > > Michael--
        > >
        > > I understand your history of running workshops for prosumers and for
        > > media professionals. I remember when you set up that little shop in
        > > Manhattan down on Bowery back in the early days (2003?) selling
        > > classes to people wanting to learn how to shoot on Canon XL-1's and
        > > edit with FCP. We briefly talked one afternoon. I believe the whole
        > > pitch was that people could make a TV segment, magazine style, that
        > > ABC (your old network) would buy? Wish the networks actually had been
        > > into that idea. Then people learned to just go around the networks.
        > >
        > > If you knew the history of this group, we started out really pushing
        > > personal storytelling. Many of us were more into the obnoxious punk,
        > > public access scene of personal video. Dont make a 3-minute "news
        > > story" that would need some invisible executive to approve of before
        > > it gets shown. Instead make the craziest and/or mundane clip of your
        > > life and throw it up there. Make a lot of them. The blog itself would
        > > become the documentary of your life. I know the early tone of being
        > > against ads or formatting your videos for commercial purposes made a
        > > lot of people angry. There are long long threads around this debate.
        > > Search "Rocketboom" in the archives circa 2004/2005.
        > >
        > > Then Youtube came along to make online video normal and easy. Many
        > > folks on this list started getting video gigs, careers. Some just
        > > added video into their current positions. Some here have started
        > > teaching at university. Some built online video companies. Some are
        > > making money with ads on shows. Some have continued to document their
        > > lives in video and will have the most awesome video history ever.
        > > Those videos will be gold to their grandkids. Im glad personal
        > > storytelling is alive and well.
        > >
        > > So http://www.pitchcon.org/ fits right in with how all these things
        > > are evolving. A conference to teach you how to pitch your online web
        > > series to Hollywood. Right? $395 for early bird registration seems
        > > really high. I know I could never afford that. And it does make me
        > > cringe thinking people might be drawn back in to asking permission
        > > from gatekeepers to make their show. Just make the show if that's
        > > where your creativity is bubbling, put it on blip or Youtube, and
        > > throw on ads. Supposedly the successful shows are making tens of
        > > thousands of dollars a year.
        > >
        > > Ive known David Lee King for a long time online. He really pioneered
        > > shooting, editing, uploading on the iPhone right as it came out. So
        > > incredible that you can do this. All the video coming out of the
        > > revolutions in the Middle East and elsewhere give testimony to this
        > > kind of storytelling and videomaking. Total punk rock. These kind of
        > > simple videos are literally changing human history. But we all have to
        > > make living somehow after we take down the dictators.
        > >
        > > Anyway this list has been real quiet the past couple years. Been a
        > > long time since we've had a good flame war over money. I miss
        > > everyone!
        > >
        > > Jay
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > --
        > > 917 371 6790
        > > 540 860 0673
        > >
        >
        >
        >



        --
        Jim Turner
        One By One Media, LLC
        www.onebyonemedia.com
        www.bloggersforhire.com
        @Genuine
        this email is: [ ] bloggable [x] ask first [ ] private


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • StanH
        ... I guess I have problems with the word, serious . Is pitching to LA studios and networks the way to be serious ? Is it really up a notch? What if we
        Message 3 of 9 , May 4, 2011
        • 0 Attachment
          --- In videoblogging@yahoogroups.com, Michael Rosenblum <michael@...> wrote:
          >
          > Want to move your online video up a notch?
          > NATPE (National Association of Television Producers and Executives) is
          > running a 2-day conference on how to pitch your work to the LA studios
          > and networks
          > Pitchcon
          > If you want to get serious this is the place to do it.

          I guess I have problems with the word, "serious".

          Is pitching to LA studios and networks the way to be "serious"? Is it really "up" a notch?

          What if we don't want to be that kind of "serious" and instead keep making personal content that reaches out to people without pandering to them? I haven't seen that the LA studios and networks have a clue how to do that.

          What *we* don't have a clue about is making money, or at least a living, out of what we are doing. That does not mean we have to change our content, but we do have to think about new ways to promote what we do rather than emulate the success of television and studio production.

          Just a thought that needs to be developed...

          Stan Hirson
          http://PinePlainsViews.com
          http://LifeWithHorses.com
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