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Re: [videoblogging] Blog Sponsorship

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  • Mark Villaseñor
    David Jones: Does anyone have any thoughts and practical experience in this kind of sponsorship thing... Hey Dave: Well, you ve a number of options to
    Message 1 of 4 , Jul 1, 2010
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      David Jones: "Does anyone have any thoughts and practical experience in this
      kind of sponsorship thing..."

      Hey Dave:
      Well, you've a number of options to overcome the "permanent" sponsor ad
      placement dilemma. Although that said, placing ads that naturally become
      permanent in a video is always going to be problematic.

      Since you already do a great job of reviewing devices and toys, I'd suggest
      to capitalize on that angle and nix notions of sponsorship per se. Sponsors,
      in a more strict sense, usually like repeated exposure for minimum
      contribution. For a BUSINESS interest (one who seeks to make a few bucks,
      like via your Vlog) this is also troublesome, because (theoretically) once
      paid the sponsor can opt-out and you're stuck with promoting their stuff
      (unpaid)!

      ...So turn that around, with what you're already doing.

      Contact manufacturers or distributors of the gadgets and gizmos you review,
      and work out a bulk sales license for a limited (albeit high) number of
      units - like 100 or more -- at a significantly discounted per-sale price
      (meaning: they'd only sell you product that is pre-sold). They'd also supply
      a demo product, and might agree to drop-ship sold items directly to
      purchasers. If they don't you'll have to handle fulfillment, but that's not
      as difficult as may seem in most cases.

      Disclose to your viewers the product(s) you're demoing on-camera are for
      sale, through a "special" arrangement with whomever. Price the demo'd
      unit(s) under market (cheaper then what they could buy retail, but still
      allow you a small profit), and pitch those items by reference (as in, a link
      in the sidebar where the viewer can buy). Be sure to disclose the LIMITED
      number of available units. (Personally, I'd hammer that last bit.)

      When the number of available/licensed units run out, you can either pull the
      video or re-up with the manufacturer/distributor for more product. And if
      they don't or can't provide such, THEN pull the vid. And repeat the process.

      If I understood your model better I'm sure other suggestions would come to
      mind, but based on what you're indicated... :D

      Happy Trails,
      Mark Villaseñor,
      http://www.TailTrex.tv
      Canine Adventures For Charity - sm
      http://www.SOAR508.org
    • Cris Thomas
      I have been selling embedded ads and sponsorships. The permanent nature of these is one of the bigger selling points. I have no idea what industry rates are
      Message 2 of 4 , Jul 2, 2010
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        I have been selling embedded ads and sponsorships. The permanent nature of these is one of the bigger selling points. I have no idea what industry rates are for such things, I suspect it would vary based not only on number of viewers but just how targeted your content was.

        I'm charging $2500 for a ten second 'Sponsored by' spot that runs for six months. This runs near the beginning on the episode, basically just a logo shot with a voice over. I have also been trying to sell ads embedded into each episode. My format allows for two such ad breaks. I have been quoting potential advertisers $500 per 10 seconds for four episodes.

        - C. Thomas
      • David Jones
        ... Excellent, thanks for the specific feedback Chris. My content is very niche so advertiser relevance and click through rates are very high. Regards Dave.
        Message 3 of 4 , Jul 2, 2010
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          On Fri, Jul 2, 2010 at 11:50 PM, Cris Thomas <thomas_cris@...> wrote:
          >
          > I have been selling embedded ads and sponsorships. The permanent nature of these is one of the bigger selling points. I have no idea what industry rates are for such things, I suspect it would vary based not only on number of viewers but just how targeted your content was.
          >
          > I'm charging $2500 for a ten second 'Sponsored by' spot that runs for six months. This runs near the beginning on the episode, basically just a logo shot with a voice over. I have also been trying to sell ads embedded into each episode. My format allows for two such ad breaks. I have been quoting potential advertisers $500 per 10 seconds for four episodes.
          >
          > - C. Thomas

          Excellent, thanks for the specific feedback Chris.
          My content is very niche so advertiser relevance and click through
          rates are very high.

          Regards
          Dave.
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