Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

Re: [videoblogging] files

Expand Messages
  • David Jones
    ... Here are some Apple recommendations: http://www.apple.com/quicktime/tutorials/h264.html What settings do other people use for their final output? For my
    Message 1 of 9 , Jun 6 10:00 PM
      On Mon, Jun 7, 2010 at 2:44 PM, Tom Dolan <tomjdolan@...> wrote:
      >
      > Thanx for taking the time to explain that Adrian, I guess I'll select
      > 'quick start' when I convert. I use Quick Time Pro to convert from
      > iMovie to a QT movie which I then upload to YouTube, blip and a few
      > others. My files have been very large, even after following the advice
      > of a very popular vid-blogger. I don't like the resolution that he
      > apparently finds acceptable. But thru trial & error just the other
      > day, I discovered a combo of selections that reduced my file size to
      > about 1/3 size with ok acceptable rez.

      Here are some Apple recommendations:
      http://www.apple.com/quicktime/tutorials/h264.html

      What settings do other people use for their final output?

      For my talking head blog I generate 1280x720 MP4 at either 2000Kbps or
      2500Kbps average sample rate using Handbrake, using 2 pass encoding if
      I'm not in a hurry. Uploaded to Youtube.
      Sometimes I'll use 3000Kbps or a bit higher for slightly higher
      quality if I think my content deserves it or has more motion content
      than normal.

      Dave.
    • Joly MacFie
      For YouTube I ve been using 2 - 4mbps for ages, but recently I ve upped myself to 10-20mpbs on short clips and it really does improve things. If one can afford
      Message 2 of 9 , Jun 6 10:16 PM
        For YouTube I've been using 2 - 4mbps for ages, but recently I've
        upped myself to 10-20mpbs on short clips and it really does improve
        things.

        If one can afford the bandwidth there's no reason not to go even
        higher - there's a 20GB limit, right?

        j

        > For my talking head blog I generate 1280x720 MP4 at either 2000Kbps or
        > 2500Kbps average sample rate using Handbrake, using 2 pass encoding if
        > I'm not in a hurry. Uploaded to Youtube.
        > Sometimes I'll use 3000Kbps or a bit higher for slightly higher
        > quality if I think my content deserves it or has more motion content
        > than normal.
        >
        > Dave.
        >
        >
        > ------------------------------------
        >
        > Yahoo! Groups Links
        >
        >
        >
        >



        --
        ---------------------------------------------------------------
        Joly MacFie 218 565 9365 Skype:punkcast
        WWWhatsup NYC - http://wwwhatsup.com
        http://pinstand.com - http://punkcast.com
        Secretary - ISOC-NY - http://isoc-ny.org
        ---------------------------------------------------------------
      • David Jones
        ... 20GB for partners, 2GB for the plebs. It also depends on your source material. My Sanyo Xacti shoots at 1280x720 6Mbps, so it s kinda pointless to render
        Message 3 of 9 , Jun 6 10:32 PM
          On Mon, Jun 7, 2010 at 3:16 PM, Joly MacFie <joly@...> wrote:
          >
          > For YouTube I've been using 2 - 4mbps for ages, but recently I've
          > upped myself to 10-20mpbs on short clips and it really does improve
          > things.
          >
          > If one can afford the bandwidth there's no reason not to go even
          > higher - there's a 20GB limit, right?

          20GB for partners, 2GB for the plebs.
          It also depends on your source material. My Sanyo Xacti shoots at
          1280x720 6Mbps, so it's kinda pointless to render any higher than that
          on my final output. Especially after there being slight loss due to
          the rendering to MP2 and then converting back to the final MP4.

          For short and/or important clips I'll ramp it up, but a 1 hour long
          talking head blog episode gets the 2Mbps treatment :->

          Dave.
        • Adrian Miles
          biggest mistake is to set manual keyframes. make them automatic (also known as natural), will produce better compression results and generally smaller file
          Message 4 of 9 , Jun 7 4:34 AM
            biggest mistake is to set manual keyframes. make them automatic (also known
            as natural), will produce better compression results and generally smaller
            file sizes...


            an appropriate closing
            Adrian Miles
            School of Media and Communication
            Program Director B.Comm Honours
            vogmae.net.au


            On 7 June 2010 14:44, Tom Dolan <tomjdolan@...> wrote:

            > Thanx for taking the time to explain that Adrian, I guess I'll select
            > 'quick start' when I convert. I use Quick Time Pro to convert from
            > iMovie to a QT movie which I then upload to YouTube, blip and a few
            > others. My files have been very large, even after following the advice
            > of a very popular vid-blogger. I don't like the resolution that he
            > apparently finds acceptable. But thru trial & error just the other
            > day, I discovered a combo of selections that reduced my file size to
            > about 1/3 size with ok acceptable rez.
            >


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • adammercado@att.net
            Flattening, in the QuickTime context, means baking all the data into one files, as opposed to referencing outside files. QuickTime has the ability to create
            Message 5 of 9 , Jun 7 9:33 AM
              Flattening, in the QuickTime context, means baking all the data into one files, as opposed to referencing outside files. QuickTime has the ability to create very small reference movies, basically containers for external content - audio, video, sprite, text - packaged yp into one file. When saving out of QTPro or FinalCut you have the option to save a reference movie, or a flattened movie. reference movies out of FCP are great as it allows you save a final master without making a very large file. FCP is referencing your captured footage and render files when saving out a reference movie, otherwise you would essentially be duplicating what is already on your hard drive, a waste of space.

              But the problem is if those source files go missing, the unbaked reference file is useless. Also, QuickTime is able to update the internal links in the reference file so if you move the external files to a different location the reference file will still play correctly. THis has caught me out on occasion, thinking once the files moved to the trash the ref movie still played everything was okay. But once the trash was emptied, the ref movie failed. I wish there was some kind of visual indicator.

              hope that helps
              -adam

              --- In videoblogging@yahoogroups.com, Tom Dolan <tomjdolan@...> wrote:
              >
              > Hi,
              >
              > Can someone tell me the meaning of: "Flattened" movie or video file?
              > I'm looking into different ways to compress for the web from iMovie
              > and occasionally I see this term.
              >
              > Thanx
              > Tom Dolan
              > tomjdolan.com
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              >
            Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.