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Re: [videoblogging] Crash Test Kitchen checking in

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  • Jay dedman
    ... Welcome back Waz. I thin many of us have found our groove and add little new technologies as needed. i know some here are jumping into the DSLR world for
    Message 1 of 6 , Apr 2, 2010
      > Lenny and myself are still doing Crash Test Kitchen whenever we can, and I've got Garage Night TV on my plate as well. Still taking the lo-fi how-to approach, with some concessions to modernity - have just bought a Canon HF200 AVCHD camera and gone widescreen. Oh the joys of editing AVCHD! Actually I'm having reasonable success with Adobe Premiere Elements and Free HD Converter.
      > http://www.crashtestkitchen.com
      > http://www.garagenight.tv

      Welcome back Waz. I thin many of us have found our groove and add
      little new technologies as needed. i know some here are jumping into
      the DSLR world for video. We're about to buy one ourselves. Quality
      just gets better and better.

      Jay



      --
      http://ryanishungry.com
      http://momentshowing.net
      http://twitter.com/jaydedman
      917 371 6790
    • wazman_au
      ... Hi Jay, A friend of mine has just made a short film using the Red format. The progressive way that the compression works sounds like it might be ideal for
      Message 2 of 6 , Apr 3, 2010
        > Welcome back Waz. I thin many of us have found our groove and add
        > little new technologies as needed. i know some here are jumping into
        > the DSLR world for video. We're about to buy one ourselves. Quality
        > just gets better and better.
        > Jay

        Hi Jay,

        A friend of mine has just made a short film using the Red format. The progressive way that the compression works sounds like it might be ideal for web video. Imagine you've got a 1GB file - if you only download the first 100MB, say, you still get the whole length of the video, but in a lower resolution. That's as I understand it, anyway. So imagine a person with a slower connection being able to view your video more or less immediately at a lower resolution, or wait for the resolution to build up.

        There has probably been a lot of discussion here about Red that I've missed! For now I'm pretty chuffed with my new HF200 and not having to juggle tapes any more. When I convert the video my old single core Dell notebook - the one we started Crash Test Kitchen with in 2004 - can still handle the editing!

        Waz
        http://www.crashtestkitchen.com
        http://www.garagenight.tv
      • Quirk
        I didn t realize Red did progressive resolution like that. I know MS Silverlight does that though. Netflix and CBS both use it, and it works really well. Even
        Message 3 of 6 , Apr 3, 2010
          I didn't realize Red did progressive resolution like that. I know MS Silverlight does that though. Netflix and CBS both use it, and it works really well. Even if you don't like sports I suggest you check out CBS' NCAA or NFL videoplayer sometime, their coverage of live sports online is the pinnacle of live interactive TV. Custom camera angles, dvr controls, etc.
          Sent via dynamic wireless technology device

          -----Original Message-----
          From: "wazman_au" <elefantman@...>
          Date: Sat, 03 Apr 2010 09:25:35
          To: <videoblogging@yahoogroups.com>
          Subject: [videoblogging] Re: Crash Test Kitchen checking in

          > Welcome back Waz. I thin many of us have found our groove and add
          > little new technologies as needed. i know some here are jumping into
          > the DSLR world for video. We're about to buy one ourselves. Quality
          > just gets better and better.
          > Jay

          Hi Jay,

          A friend of mine has just made a short film using the Red format. The progressive way that the compression works sounds like it might be ideal for web video. Imagine you've got a 1GB file - if you only download the first 100MB, say, you still get the whole length of the video, but in a lower resolution. That's as I understand it, anyway. So imagine a person with a slower connection being able to view your video more or less immediately at a lower resolution, or wait for the resolution to build up.

          There has probably been a lot of discussion here about Red that I've missed! For now I'm pretty chuffed with my new HF200 and not having to juggle tapes any more. When I convert the video my old single core Dell notebook - the one we started Crash Test Kitchen with in 2004 - can still handle the editing!

          Waz
          http://www.crashtestkitchen.com
          http://www.garagenight.tv



          ------------------------------------

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        • Jay dedman
          ... I would love to get confirmation of this fact. As Quirk said, Silverlight enables this kind of downloading..but I wonder if it can get its orgins from the
          Message 4 of 6 , Apr 3, 2010
            > A friend of mine has just made a short film using the Red format. The progressive way that the compression works sounds like it might be ideal for web video. Imagine you've got a 1GB file - if you only download the first 100MB, say, you still get the whole length of the video, but in a lower resolution. That's as I understand it, anyway. So imagine a person with a slower connection >being able to view your video more or less immediately at a lower resolution, or wait for the resolution to build up.

            I would love to get confirmation of this fact. As Quirk said,
            Silverlight enables this kind of downloading..but I wonder if it can
            get its orgins from the actual camera you use.

            > There has probably been a lot of discussion here about Red that I've missed! For now I'm pretty chuffed with my new HF200 and not having to juggle tapes any more. When I convert the video my old single core Dell notebook - the one we started Crash >Test Kitchen with in 2004 - can still handle the editing!

            We havent spoken about the RED camera much here because no one has one
            yet (or admitted to it). We have pointed to the small RED camera that
            they're working on that will be pro-sumer. Currently, we've all been
            trading examples of what the DLSR's (Mark V/VII + Lumix) can do. A
            number of people here arenow using them for their video work. The SLR
            lenses seems to really make the difference.

            Jay

            --
            http://ryanishungry.com
            http://momentshowing.net
            http://twitter.com/jaydedman
            917 371 6790
          • elbowsofdeath
            Its interesting stuff. Adobe have offered it for years providing you use their flash media server. As already mentioned Silverlight can do it, but again you
            Message 5 of 6 , Apr 4, 2010
              Its interesting stuff. Adobe have offered it for years providing you use their flash media server. As already mentioned Silverlight can do it, but again you need some Microsoft tech on the server side. Apple offer it via http streaming which their more recent iphones, ipad, safari & quicktime can support, and the big advantage here is that you dont need anything special on the webserver. Obviously the drawback with the Apple method is that it only works on some client-side devices.

              All of these approaches require that you encode your video using the right tools, which will enable you to encode the video at more than one bitrate, to target users with varying bandwidth availability.

              Aside from the adaptive/smooth/dynamic bitrate stuff, the other advantage with this streaming is the ability to jump ahead in the video without waiting for all the earlier part of the video to download. There may be other ways to do this though, Im sure youtube does it and Im not sure what technology they use.

              As for the Red cameras, generally they create extremely large files compare to the cameras we are used to, its one of their strengths because it can deliver great quality but obviously causes some issues with having a beefy enough machine to do the editing etc. I cant imagine red format files being suitable for putting on the web at all, as depending on the compression settings chosen you could easily be looking at 1 second of video creating a file that is 1gb in size!

              Apple HTTP Live Streaming overview:

              http://developer.apple.com/iphone/library/documentation/NetworkingInternet/Conceptual/StreamingMediaGuide/HTTPStreamingArchitecture/HTTPStreamingArchitecture.html#//apple_ref/doc/uid/TP40008332-CH101-SW2

              Silverlight Smooth Streaming:

              http://www.microsoft.com/silverlight/smoothstreaming/

              Dynamic streaming in Flash Media Server:

              http://www.adobe.com/devnet/flashmediaserver/articles/dynstream_advanced_pt1.html

              Red recoding FAQ:

              http://www.red.com/faq/category/redone/redone-recording/


              Cheers

              Steve Elbows

              --- In videoblogging@yahoogroups.com, Jay dedman <jay.dedman@...> wrote:
              >
              > > A friend of mine has just made a short film using the Red format. The progressive way that the compression works sounds like it might be ideal for web video. Imagine you've got a 1GB file - if you only download the first 100MB, say, you still get the whole length of the video, but in a lower resolution. That's as I understand it, anyway. So imagine a person with a slower connection >being able to view your video more or less immediately at a lower resolution, or wait for the resolution to build up.
              >
              > I would love to get confirmation of this fact. As Quirk said,
              > Silverlight enables this kind of downloading..but I wonder if it can
              > get its orgins from the actual camera you use.
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