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Google Wave & the state of the net in general

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  • elbowsofdeath
    Google Wave interests me. On face value its just googles answer to twitter, social networks, forums, email & blog comments, but the way they are doing it makes
    Message 1 of 6 , Oct 1, 2009
      Google Wave interests me. On face value its just googles answer to twitter, social networks, forums, email & blog comments, but the way they are doing it makes me interested. For as well as the usual APIs that will allow developers to add functionality to the platform, and the now standard ability for users to embed this stuff in their own sites, they are also releasing full details on the protocol used to make the service work, as well as example code which demonstrates how to make your own clients and servers. If adopted by people, this means we dont have to worry about Google having complete control over this stuff and it all being centralised in the usual way.

      So has anybody looked at it in detail? At this stage its one of those annoying invitation-based betas so I havent had the opportunity to try it myself, though the developers stuff I mention is available and Im starting to read more detail about it.

      Im interested in it from the point of view of solving stuff we talked about here over the years: aggregating content and conversations in a more sophisticated way, whilst still retaining control of the data and not ending up in a walled gardem that al the API's from the likes of facebook have not really torn down, they just added more gates to the wall.

      What significant developments have happened on the web in recent years, especially pertaining to vlogging? I took my eyes off the ball for a while after getting tired with the hype filled web 2.0 stuff once it reached the silly greedy commercial stage and then started to vanish up its own backside, whats occuring apart from the obvious like facebook and twitter? How have the video hosting services evolved, or have they just been treading water and trying to survive in recent times?

      Are there any interesting projects that people are throwing themselves into? There is a hole in my life where once I used to be able to have dreams inspired by the likes of fireant, mefeedia, showinabox, and all sorts of other things whose names now escape me. Wow, I cant even remember the name of the video hosting site that used archive.org and never quite lived up to its potential.

      Cheers

      Steve Elbows
    • elbowsofdeath
      Here is an intro video about wave, looks like I missed wiki and instant messaging when trying to list the sorts of things its inspired by/designed to replace.
      Message 2 of 6 , Oct 1, 2009
        Here is an intro video about wave, looks like I missed wiki and instant messaging when trying to list the sorts of things its inspired by/designed to replace.

        http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p6pgxLaDdQw

        And I finally remembered the name of the video host of old: ourmedia. Ive just been catching up with where this and some other sites have ended up, they are still alive but not exactly bursting with momentum or giving us much to talk about. Speaking of which, are some of the conversations that used to happen on this group now taking place on twitter or friendfeed or peoples blogs or other communities, or are they not happening much at all now? Its nice to see this group busier of late, and Im just a wondering how to get a sense of the state of things, everything is so fragmented and based on popularity or social connections these days, Im a bit lost.

        Cheers

        Steve Elbows

        --- In videoblogging@yahoogroups.com, "elbowsofdeath" <steve@...> wrote:
        >
        > Google Wave interests me. On face value its just googles answer to twitter, social networks, forums, email & blog comments, but the way they are doing it makes me interested. For as well as the usual APIs that will allow developers to add functionality to the platform, and the now standard ability for users to embed this stuff in their own sites, they are also releasing full details on the protocol used to make the service work, as well as example code which demonstrates how to make your own clients and servers. If adopted by people, this means we dont have to worry about Google having complete control over this stuff and it all being centralised in the usual way.
        >
        > So has anybody looked at it in detail? At this stage its one of those annoying invitation-based betas so I havent had the opportunity to try it myself, though the developers stuff I mention is available and Im starting to read more detail about it.
        >
        > Im interested in it from the point of view of solving stuff we talked about here over the years: aggregating content and conversations in a more sophisticated way, whilst still retaining control of the data and not ending up in a walled gardem that al the API's from the likes of facebook have not really torn down, they just added more gates to the wall.
        >
        > What significant developments have happened on the web in recent years, especially pertaining to vlogging? I took my eyes off the ball for a while after getting tired with the hype filled web 2.0 stuff once it reached the silly greedy commercial stage and then started to vanish up its own backside, whats occuring apart from the obvious like facebook and twitter? How have the video hosting services evolved, or have they just been treading water and trying to survive in recent times?
        >
        > Are there any interesting projects that people are throwing themselves into? There is a hole in my life where once I used to be able to have dreams inspired by the likes of fireant, mefeedia, showinabox, and all sorts of other things whose names now escape me. Wow, I cant even remember the name of the video hosting site that used archive.org and never quite lived up to its potential.
        >
        > Cheers
        >
        > Steve Elbows
        >
      • Rupert Howe
        Steve, On 1-Oct-09, at 5:19 PM, elbowsofdeath wrote: What significant developments have happened on the web in recent years, especially pertaining to vlogging?
        Message 3 of 6 , Oct 2, 2009
          Steve,

          On 1-Oct-09, at 5:19 PM, elbowsofdeath wrote:
          What significant developments have happened on the web in recent
          years, especially pertaining to vlogging?
          How have the video hosting services evolved, or have they just been
          treading water and trying to survive in recent times?
          Are there any interesting projects that people are throwing themselves
          into?

          Check out the Artists in the Cloud group:
          http://groups.google.com/group/artists-in-the-cloud/
          where people are discussing this stuff and circling the kind of video
          projects they're considering throwing themselves into.
        • Jay dedman
          ... just been catching up with where this and some other sites have ended up, they are still alive but not exactly bursting with momentum or giving us much to
          Message 4 of 6 , Oct 4, 2009
            > And I finally remembered the name of the video host of old: ourmedia. Ive
            just been catching up with where this and some other sites have ended up,
            they are still alive but not exactly bursting with momentum or giving us
            much to talk about. Speaking of which, are some of the conversations that
            used to happen on this group now taking place on twitter or friendfeed or
            peoples blogs or other communities, or are they not happening much at all
            now? Its nice to see this group busier of late, and Im just a wondering how
            to get a sense of the state of things, everything is so fragmented and based
            on popularity or social connections >these days, Im a bit lost.

            It comes and goes. As you say, there are a lot more places where
            conversations are happening. Videoblogging has also become more and more
            ubiquitous.

            I still think we're in the new phase that is two-pronged:

            - Now that we have this great distribution mechanism for video, what
            video did we wanted to make in the first place? After three generations
            sucked in by broadcast TV, what do we want to say to each other now?
            - Much of online video is still based on the TV/film model (ie edited
            stories). Can we tell stories in different ways online?

            It's a pretty exciting time if you avoid getting overwhelmed. Anything you
            do could be the first time its been done.

            Jay


            --
            http://ryanishungry.com
            http://jaydedman.com
            http://twitter.com/jaydedman
            917 371 6790


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • sull
            Anything you do could be the first time its been done. - Jay Dedman, October 2009 ... [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            Message 5 of 6 , Oct 4, 2009
              "Anything you do could be the first time its been done." - Jay Dedman,
              October 2009


              On Sun, Oct 4, 2009 at 10:13 AM, Jay dedman <jay.dedman@...> wrote:

              >
              >
              > > And I finally remembered the name of the video host of old: ourmedia. Ive
              > just been catching up with where this and some other sites have ended up,
              > they are still alive but not exactly bursting with momentum or giving us
              > much to talk about. Speaking of which, are some of the conversations that
              > used to happen on this group now taking place on twitter or friendfeed or
              > peoples blogs or other communities, or are they not happening much at all
              > now? Its nice to see this group busier of late, and Im just a wondering how
              > to get a sense of the state of things, everything is so fragmented and
              > based
              > on popularity or social connections >these days, Im a bit lost.
              >
              > It comes and goes. As you say, there are a lot more places where
              > conversations are happening. Videoblogging has also become more and more
              > ubiquitous.
              >
              > I still think we're in the new phase that is two-pronged:
              >
              > - Now that we have this great distribution mechanism for video, what
              > video did we wanted to make in the first place? After three generations
              > sucked in by broadcast TV, what do we want to say to each other now?
              > - Much of online video is still based on the TV/film model (ie edited
              > stories). Can we tell stories in different ways online?
              >
              > It's a pretty exciting time if you avoid getting overwhelmed. Anything you
              > do could be the first time its been done.
              >
              > Jay
              >
              > --
              > http://ryanishungry.com
              > http://jaydedman.com
              > http://twitter.com/jaydedman
              > 917 371 6790
              >
              > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              >
              >
              >


              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • elbowsofdeath
              Hello, Thanks very much for the info, and thanks to Jay too for his thoughts. Cheers Steve
              Message 6 of 6 , Oct 6, 2009
                Hello,

                Thanks very much for the info, and thanks to Jay too for his thoughts.

                Cheers

                Steve

                --- In videoblogging@yahoogroups.com, Rupert Howe <rupert@...> wrote:
                >
                > Steve,
                >
                > On 1-Oct-09, at 5:19 PM, elbowsofdeath wrote:
                > What significant developments have happened on the web in recent
                > years, especially pertaining to vlogging?
                > How have the video hosting services evolved, or have they just been
                > treading water and trying to survive in recent times?
                > Are there any interesting projects that people are throwing themselves
                > into?
                >
                > Check out the Artists in the Cloud group:
                > http://groups.google.com/group/artists-in-the-cloud/
                > where people are discussing this stuff and circling the kind of video
                > projects they're considering throwing themselves into.
                >
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