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What Randy mann Said in the Videoconference last night.

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  • Paul Knight
    Hi, some of us were having audio problems last night in the video conference thingy, Randy kept on coming thru in slow motion, well his sound anyways. Here is
    Message 1 of 16 , Aug 30, 2009
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      Hi, some of us were having audio problems last night in the video
      conference thingy, Randy kept on coming thru in slow motion, well his
      sound anyways.
      Here is what he said, I managed to downlaod it and speed it up, slowed
      down it sounds like Jabba the Hut dictating his shopping list in
      Huttese.

      http://blip.tv/file/2532838

      There you go.


      Paul
    • RANDY MANN
      fucking cracking my self up ... [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      Message 2 of 16 , Aug 30, 2009
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        fucking cracking my self up

        On Sun, Aug 30, 2009 at 8:58 AM, RANDY MANN <themaddmann@...> wrote:

        > wow i cant beleve i was like that i wasnt fucking around like i normaly do
        >
        > randy
        >
        >
        > On Sun, Aug 30, 2009 at 5:56 AM, Paul Knight <paul.knight7@...>wrote:
        >
        >>
        >>
        >> Hi, some of us were having audio problems last night in the video
        >> conference thingy, Randy kept on coming thru in slow motion, well his
        >> sound anyways.
        >> Here is what he said, I managed to downlaod it and speed it up, slowed
        >> down it sounds like Jabba the Hut dictating his shopping list in
        >> Huttese.
        >>
        >> http://blip.tv/file/2532838
        >>
        >> There you go.
        >>
        >> Paul
        >>
        >>
        >>
        >
        >


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Jay dedman
        ... I got to apologize to Randy because we were giving him a good ribbing due to his slo-mo talk. Instead, Paul discovers he was actually sharing intelligent
        Message 3 of 16 , Aug 30, 2009
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          > Hi, some of us were having audio problems last night in the video
          > conference thingy, Randy kept on coming thru in slow motion, well his
          > sound anyways.
          > Here is what he said, I managed to downlaod it and speed it up, slowed
          > down it sounds like Jabba the Hut dictating his shopping list in
          > Huttese.
          > http://blip.tv/file/2532838
          > There you go.

          I got to apologize to Randy because we were giving him a good ribbing
          due to his slo-mo talk. Instead, Paul discovers he was actually
          sharing intelligent facts.

          By the way....we had a long discussion about some of the predecessors
          to videobloggers. Like Fred Wiseman, Maysles Brothers, Pennebaker, Jon
          Alpert.

          Saw a movie last night that is an even more recent example:
          http://www.weliveinpublicthemovie.com/
          Trailer: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_XSTwfdFwIY

          Josh Harris was doing some crazy stuff in the late 90's with online
          video. Much darker and more paranoid, but very interesting take.

          Jay

          --
          http://ryanishungry.com
          http://jaydedman.com
          http://twitter.com/jaydedman
          917 371 6790
        • scott stead
          Also - here s a photo of Al Maysles and I from Silverdocs - where he was honored with the Guggenheim award. http://www.flickr.com/photos/scottstead/3638588645/
          Message 4 of 16 , Aug 31, 2009
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            Also - here's a photo of Al Maysles and I from Silverdocs - where he was
            honored with the Guggenheim award.
            http://www.flickr.com/photos/scottstead/3638588645/

            He's an amazing guy. He was discussing with me and a few other folks how we
            have a state department, a department of defense - how they're all war
            departments. He wanted to discuss with some folks on the hill while he was
            here about starting a peace department.

            This all just comes back full circle for me what I was talking about in the
            video conference - how do we bridge the gap between documentarians and
            videobloggers?

            Their content isn't all that different. They have similar editing workflow
            conversations. Our art forms are not that different and if anything are
            converging. Rupert was talking about doing filmatic screenings of
            videobloggers works in a theater like format. They're trying to get their
            content to the web. I am going to refrain from using the phrase Transmedia -
            because it will keep being rebranded and frankly terms like that drive me
            batty - but essentially its all converging. We're all artists - as much as
            the 'new media journalists' want to be, and essentially are - journalists.
            It all ends up on a screen (they just vary in size) its just a matter of us
            all helping each other out to get it on the screen we want it to be on - if
            not all of them - best we can.

            Thoughts?

            Cheers.
            Scott Stead
            www.scottstead.com
            www.documentaryclub.org


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Jay dedman
            ... Ive long wondered why documentarians and filmmakers have been the slowest to adopt these tools and distribution. Ive heard the reasons but they seem bogus.
            Message 5 of 16 , Sep 3, 2009
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              > This all just comes back full circle for me what I was talking about in the
              > video conference - how do we bridge the gap between documentarians and
              > videobloggers?
              >
              > Their content isn't all that different. They have similar editing workflow
              > conversations. Our art forms are not that different and if anything are
              > converging. Rupert was talking about doing filmatic screenings of
              > videobloggers works in a theater like format. They're trying to get their
              > content to the web. I am going to refrain from using the phrase Transmedia -
              > because it will keep being rebranded and frankly terms like that drive me
              > batty - but essentially its all converging. We're all artists - as much as
              > the 'new media journalists' want to be, and essentially are - journalists.
              > It all ends up on a screen (they just vary in size) its just a matter of us
              > all helping each other out to get it on the screen we want it to be on - if
              > not all of them - best we can.
              > Thoughts?


              Ive long wondered why documentarians and filmmakers have been the
              slowest to adopt these tools and distribution. Ive heard the reasons
              but they seem bogus. I'm tired of money always being the problem. No
              one is ever just gong to give you money without you first being bold.

              I agree that "videobloggers" can definitely share an understanding of
              the online world....while more more formal "filmmakers" can share the
              process of gathering and telling a story.

              Id love to see a bridge created between the two groups.

              Jay


              --
              http://ryanishungry.com
              http://jaydedman.com
              http://twitter.com/jaydedman
              917 371 6790
            • Jeffrey Taylor
              The holy grail for documentarians is an Oscar nomination or nomination for another award. Many of these awards require that the film only be seen on theatres
              Message 6 of 16 , Sep 3, 2009
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                The holy grail for documentarians is an Oscar nomination or nomination for
                another award. Many of these awards require that the film only be seen on
                theatres in order to be nominated. As a result, the culture of documentary
                film-making will be geared towards traditional theatre presentation until
                the rules for awards begin to change.

                I personally feel that this is suppressing the art of documentary film, and
                hope that the motion picture academy and other orgs will relax these
                requirements in order to give documentarians more opportunity to distribute
                and make money from their work.

                On Thu, Sep 3, 2009 at 8:21 AM, Jay dedman <jay.dedman@...> wrote:

                >
                >
                > > This all just comes back full circle for me what I was talking about in
                > the
                > > video conference - how do we bridge the gap between documentarians and
                > > videobloggers?
                > >
                > > Their content isn't all that different. They have similar editing
                > workflow
                > > conversations. Our art forms are not that different and if anything are
                > > converging. Rupert was talking about doing filmatic screenings of
                > > videobloggers works in a theater like format. They're trying to get their
                > > content to the web. I am going to refrain from using the phrase
                > Transmedia -
                > > because it will keep being rebranded and frankly terms like that drive me
                > > batty - but essentially its all converging. We're all artists - as much
                > as
                > > the 'new media journalists' want to be, and essentially are -
                > journalists.
                > > It all ends up on a screen (they just vary in size) its just a matter of
                > us
                > > all helping each other out to get it on the screen we want it to be on -
                > if
                > > not all of them - best we can.
                > > Thoughts?
                >
                > Ive long wondered why documentarians and filmmakers have been the
                > slowest to adopt these tools and distribution. Ive heard the reasons
                > but they seem bogus. I'm tired of money always being the problem. No
                > one is ever just gong to give you money without you first being bold.
                >
                > I agree that "videobloggers" can definitely share an understanding of
                > the online world....while more more formal "filmmakers" can share the
                > process of gathering and telling a story.
                >
                > Id love to see a bridge created between the two groups.
                >
                > Jay
                >
                > --
                > http://ryanishungry.com
                > http://jaydedman.com
                > http://twitter.com/jaydedman
                > 917 371 6790
                >
                >



                --
                Jeffrey Taylor
                912 Cole St, #349
                San Francisco, CA 94117
                USA
                Mobile: +14157281264
                Fax: +33177722734
                http://twitter.com/jeffreytaylor
                http://videocampsf.com


                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • Markus Sandy
                ... Hi That sure is a funny requirement considering situations like this: I have close friend who is a housekeeper for a member of the academy. The academy
                Message 7 of 16 , Sep 3, 2009
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                  On Sep 3, 2009, at 9:09 AM, Jeffrey Taylor wrote:

                  > The holy grail for documentarians is an Oscar nomination or
                  > nomination for
                  > another award. Many of these awards require that the film only be
                  > seen on
                  > theatres in order to be nominated. As a result, the culture of
                  > documentary
                  > film-making will be geared towards traditional theatre presentation
                  > until
                  > the rules for awards begin to change.
                  >


                  Hi

                  That sure is a funny requirement considering situations like this:

                  I have close friend who is a housekeeper for a member of the academy.
                  The academy member is a well-known actor who is semi-retired (i.e. you
                  only see him in reruns these days). He gets copies of *all* the
                  nominated movies delivered to his home in Marin, but has little
                  interest in watching them. My friend takes home almost all the movies
                  and watches them with her teenage kids (score!) and they tell her what
                  they like so she can tell him how to vote. Truth is, she knows a hell
                  of a lot more about film than he does; so I guess this works out for
                  the best. :)

                  I wonder how typical this situation of proxy votes is and why we need
                  to carry on with grand illusions like the importance of theater
                  showings, especially when almost all the theaters in a place like Los
                  Angeles are almost impossible to book for an indie or docu showing (I
                  think there is only one indie chain left in LA today).

                  FWIW
                  markus




                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • Rupert Howe
                  I know members of both American & British Academies, and they re the same. They give most of their DVD freebie screeners to their kids and friends, or toss
                  Message 8 of 16 , Sep 3, 2009
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                    I know members of both American & British Academies, and they're the
                    same. They give most of their DVD freebie screeners to their kids and
                    friends, or toss them or leave them unopened.
                    You only have to look at what wins - and even what is nominated - to
                    know that the whole process is a joke, as far as artistic merit is
                    concerned. It's about commercial success masquerading as artistic
                    success, which makes it even more depressing that it influences what
                    kind of films get made, and how they get made.

                    On 3-Sep-09, at 6:16 PM, Markus Sandy wrote:

                    >
                    > On Sep 3, 2009, at 9:09 AM, Jeffrey Taylor wrote:
                    >
                    > > The holy grail for documentarians is an Oscar nomination or
                    > > nomination for
                    > > another award. Many of these awards require that the film only be
                    > > seen on
                    > > theatres in order to be nominated. As a result, the culture of
                    > > documentary
                    > > film-making will be geared towards traditional theatre presentation
                    > > until
                    > > the rules for awards begin to change.
                    > >
                    >
                    > Hi
                    >
                    > That sure is a funny requirement considering situations like this:
                    >
                    > I have close friend who is a housekeeper for a member of the academy.
                    > The academy member is a well-known actor who is semi-retired (i.e. you
                    > only see him in reruns these days). He gets copies of *all* the
                    > nominated movies delivered to his home in Marin, but has little
                    > interest in watching them. My friend takes home almost all the movies
                    > and watches them with her teenage kids (score!) and they tell her what
                    > they like so she can tell him how to vote. Truth is, she knows a hell
                    > of a lot more about film than he does; so I guess this works out for
                    > the best. :)
                    >
                    > I wonder how typical this situation of proxy votes is and why we need
                    > to carry on with grand illusions like the importance of theater
                    > showings, especially when almost all the theaters in a place like Los
                    > Angeles are almost impossible to book for an indie or docu showing (I
                    > think there is only one indie chain left in LA today).
                    >
                    > FWIW
                    > markus
                    >
                    > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    >
                    >
                    >



                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  • Jay dedman
                    ... the ... And to flip it around....what barriers keep videobloggers from working on longer projects like documentarians? Rupert and I were just talking about
                    Message 9 of 16 , Sep 3, 2009
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                      > This all just comes back full circle for me what I was talking about in
                      the
                      > video conference - how do we bridge the gap between documentarians and
                      > videobloggers?

                      And to flip it around....what barriers keep videobloggers from working on
                      longer projects like documentarians?
                      Rupert and I were just talking about it and he sent me this list (
                      http://videoblogginggroup.pbworks.com/Barriers):


                      - 1) having an idea that you want to put energy into
                      - 2) asking permission / rejection - the fear that people will not want
                      someone videoing them and/or publishing it online
                      - 3) respect/authority - the fear that people will ask who the fuck you
                      are, and why they should talk to you. "Um, i have my own videoblog that's
                      watched by, like, *dozens* of people!"
                      - 4) self-consciousness - most people feel awkward about filming
                      themselves, and feel awkward filming anything in public, or in front of
                      other people, because they're drawing attention to themselves especially if
                      they haven't asked permission
                      - 5) law - with the police harrassing photographers & videographers
                      everywhere, the position of legality of filming people and things is unclear
                      to most people
                      - 6) audience - you put all this effort into something, and it'll be seen
                      by a few hundred people. to build an audience, you got to keep plugging
                      away, and most people are doing it in their spare time - so in a way, you've
                      got to have a) an issue or a subject that you're passionate enough about to
                      keep pushing. There's a guy who writes an ultra-local blog in my
                      neighbourhood - shepherdsbush.wordpress.com - and he has been working
                      hard at it for four years to get 3000 visits a month. it's a real
                      commitment, and most people are afraid of those kind of commitments.
                      - 7) the technology - not as much of a barrier as it used to be, but
                      still requires a level of confidence to follow a project through from start
                      to finish - even a home movie.
                      - 8) fear of failure - what if it's shit, or boring, or no one watches
                      it?

                      I must give filmmakers and documentarians quite a bit of credit for
                      investing a ot of time in a project they believe in. Often with no
                      guaranteed reward. Some of my favorite films probably never made anyone any
                      real money....but the cultural capital it created has been enormous. You do
                      it because it has to be done.

                      Jay


                      --
                      http://ryanishungry.com
                      http://jaydedman.com
                      http://twitter.com/jaydedman
                      917 371 6790


                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    • Adrian Miles
                      interesting points. :-) the other side of this of course is that some do both, but that one practice might not need to come into the other (if that makes
                      Message 10 of 16 , Sep 3, 2009
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                        interesting points. :-)

                        the other side of this of course is that some do both, but that one
                        practice might not need to come into the other (if that makes sense).
                        the web as most of the 2.0 stuff shows, is ideal for serial practice/
                        production, small pieces, loose connections. about networks, joins,
                        pathways and bite sized up to snack sized. this can and should work
                        really well in doco, but as noted in some of the comments, a lot of
                        doco practice is still about much larger scale works. So for me the
                        questions are:

                        1. what would a web native video doc be? (Seth Keen is answering this
                        one way, Florian Thalhofer another.)
                        2. how might this be combined with trad. doco?
                        3. blogs are already documentary, so what needs to change (in us or
                        the maker) to think of it more formerly as documentary in the video
                        mode?


                        On 04/09/2009, at 9:18 AM, Jay dedman wrote:

                        > And to flip it around....what barriers keep videobloggers from
                        > working on
                        > longer projects like documentarians?
                        > Rupert and I were just talking about it and he sent me this list (
                        > http://videoblogginggroup.pbworks.com/Barriers):


                        cheers
                        Adrian Miles
                        adrian.miles@...
                        Program Director, Bachelor of Communication Honours
                        vogmae.net.au
                      • Rupert Howe
                        I guess they do apply to barriers that keep videobloggers from working on longer documentary projects... But more directly, these thoughts arose from
                        Message 11 of 16 , Sep 4, 2009
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                          I guess they do apply to barriers that keep videobloggers from working
                          on longer documentary projects...
                          But more directly, these thoughts arose from conversations about why
                          lots more people weren't making videos about things outside themselves
                          - in their local communities, say. Both videobloggers and just
                          ordinary people. Even in short web-based videoblog format or on
                          YouTube.

                          On 4-Sep-09, at 12:18 AM, Jay dedman wrote:

                          > > This all just comes back full circle for me what I was talking
                          > about in
                          > the
                          > > video conference - how do we bridge the gap between documentarians
                          > and
                          > > videobloggers?
                          >
                          > And to flip it around....what barriers keep videobloggers from
                          > working on
                          > longer projects like documentarians?
                          > Rupert and I were just talking about it and he sent me this list (
                          > http://videoblogginggroup.pbworks.com/Barriers):
                          >
                          > - 1) having an idea that you want to put energy into
                          > - 2) asking permission / rejection - the fear that people will not
                          > want
                          > someone videoing them and/or publishing it online
                          > - 3) respect/authority - the fear that people will ask who the fuck
                          > you
                          > are, and why they should talk to you. "Um, i have my own videoblog
                          > that's
                          > watched by, like, *dozens* of people!"
                          > - 4) self-consciousness - most people feel awkward about filming
                          > themselves, and feel awkward filming anything in public, or in front
                          > of
                          > other people, because they're drawing attention to themselves
                          > especially if
                          > they haven't asked permission
                          > - 5) law - with the police harrassing photographers & videographers
                          > everywhere, the position of legality of filming people and things is
                          > unclear
                          > to most people
                          > - 6) audience - you put all this effort into something, and it'll be
                          > seen
                          > by a few hundred people. to build an audience, you got to keep
                          > plugging
                          > away, and most people are doing it in their spare time - so in a
                          > way, you've
                          > got to have a) an issue or a subject that you're passionate enough
                          > about to
                          > keep pushing. There's a guy who writes an ultra-local blog in my
                          > neighbourhood - shepherdsbush.wordpress.com - and he has been working
                          > hard at it for four years to get 3000 visits a month. it's a real
                          > commitment, and most people are afraid of those kind of commitments.
                          > - 7) the technology - not as much of a barrier as it used to be, but
                          > still requires a level of confidence to follow a project through
                          > from start
                          > to finish - even a home movie.
                          > - 8) fear of failure - what if it's shit, or boring, or no one watches
                          > it?
                          >
                          > I must give filmmakers and documentarians quite a bit of credit for
                          > investing a ot of time in a project they believe in. Often with no
                          > guaranteed reward. Some of my favorite films probably never made
                          > anyone any
                          > real money....but the cultural capital it created has been enormous.
                          > You do
                          > it because it has to be done.
                          >
                          > Jay
                          >
                          > --
                          > http://ryanishungry.com
                          > http://jaydedman.com
                          > http://twitter.com/jaydedman
                          > 917 371 6790
                          >
                          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                          >
                          >
                          >



                          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        • Jay dedman
                          ... I think Rupert again said it well: these thoughts arose from conversations about why lots more people weren t making videos about things outside
                          Message 12 of 16 , Sep 4, 2009
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                            > 1. what would a web native video doc be? (Seth Keen is answering this
                            > one way, Florian Thalhofer another.)
                            > 2. how might this be combined with trad. doco?
                            > 3. blogs are already documentary, so what needs to change (in us or
                            > the maker) to think of it more formerly as documentary in the video
                            > mode?

                            I think Rupert again said it well:
                            "these thoughts arose from conversations about why lots more people
                            weren't making videos about things outside themselves
                            - in their local communities, say. Both videobloggers and just
                            ordinary people. Even in short web-based videoblog format or on
                            YouTube."

                            I agree that we dont need to make a 90 minute video like a
                            documentarian would, but a videoblogger could document a community or
                            topic over a long period of time. This takes a lot of commitment.
                            http://lofistl.com/ is a good example of this.

                            Also, online video allows for all those different ways of telling a
                            story in a non-linear way. Adrian, I know you push these ideas forward
                            with the Diptychs.
                            http://vogmae.net.au/vog/2009/08/on-the-train-with-seth/

                            Another tip videobloggers could take from documentarians is to turn
                            the camera outward more often. A lot of online video is personal or
                            performance. Not a bad thing, but be interesting to see more
                            exploration of the world around us. You learn a lot about someone from
                            how they see the world.

                            I recently met Stan Hirson who's making videos about his community:
                            http://www.pineplainsviews.com/

                            Jay



                            --
                            http://ryanishungry.com
                            http://jaydedman.com
                            http://twitter.com/jaydedman
                            917 371 6790
                          • adammercado@att.net
                            This is a great discussion, and this list is pretty spot on from my perspective. At one point or another each one of these points has stopped me from following
                            Message 13 of 16 , Sep 10, 2009
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                              This is a great discussion, and this list is pretty spot on from my perspective. At one point or another each one of these points has stopped me from following through on an idea. I think it comes down to credibility, perceived or real. I remember from my student filmmaking days that approaching a propietor about using their location to shoot in was often received with a "who the fuck are you small fry" mentality. We got blown off more times than I care to remember.

                              While 'true' (for want of a better word) documentarians like Ken Burns or Robert Greenwald may be a far cry from a Michael Bay type of filmmaker, they still carry that heavy credibility with them. They also probably have PR and agents that do that type of dirty work for them. For little independent artists (videobloggers) I think it is not only intimidating to try and carry or fake that type of credibility, but the reality is few will have the proper approach to following through on something large scale.

                              As someone trying to put together a local motorcycle lifestyle show around Orange County, I've found its hard to approach local dealerships and businesses to get any kind of involvement. I guess it comes down to exposure. Why would they be interested in supporting my venture if I can't prove I have a widespread reach. If a nationally recognised filmmaker were to be in my shoes I'm sure their response would be different. I can see this obstacle being typical for many videobloggers and documantarians.

                              But what to do about it? What is the flipside of each of the points on that list I wonder?

                              -adam

                              --- In videoblogging@yahoogroups.com, Jay dedman <jay.dedman@...> wrote:
                              >
                              > > This all just comes back full circle for me what I was talking about in
                              > the
                              > > video conference - how do we bridge the gap between documentarians and
                              > > videobloggers?
                              >
                              > And to flip it around....what barriers keep videobloggers from working on
                              > longer projects like documentarians?
                              > Rupert and I were just talking about it and he sent me this list (
                              > http://videoblogginggroup.pbworks.com/Barriers):
                              >
                              >
                              > - 1) having an idea that you want to put energy into
                              > - 2) asking permission / rejection - the fear that people will not want
                              > someone videoing them and/or publishing it online
                              > - 3) respect/authority - the fear that people will ask who the fuck you
                              > are, and why they should talk to you. "Um, i have my own videoblog that's
                              > watched by, like, *dozens* of people!"
                              > - 4) self-consciousness - most people feel awkward about filming
                              > themselves, and feel awkward filming anything in public, or in front of
                              > other people, because they're drawing attention to themselves especially if
                              > they haven't asked permission
                              > - 5) law - with the police harrassing photographers & videographers
                              > everywhere, the position of legality of filming people and things is unclear
                              > to most people
                              > - 6) audience - you put all this effort into something, and it'll be seen
                              > by a few hundred people. to build an audience, you got to keep plugging
                              > away, and most people are doing it in their spare time - so in a way, you've
                              > got to have a) an issue or a subject that you're passionate enough about to
                              > keep pushing. There's a guy who writes an ultra-local blog in my
                              > neighbourhood - shepherdsbush.wordpress.com - and he has been working
                              > hard at it for four years to get 3000 visits a month. it's a real
                              > commitment, and most people are afraid of those kind of commitments.
                              > - 7) the technology - not as much of a barrier as it used to be, but
                              > still requires a level of confidence to follow a project through from start
                              > to finish - even a home movie.
                              > - 8) fear of failure - what if it's shit, or boring, or no one watches
                              > it?
                              >
                              > I must give filmmakers and documentarians quite a bit of credit for
                              > investing a ot of time in a project they believe in. Often with no
                              > guaranteed reward. Some of my favorite films probably never made anyone any
                              > real money....but the cultural capital it created has been enormous. You do
                              > it because it has to be done.
                              >
                              > Jay
                              >
                              >
                              > --
                              > http://ryanishungry.com
                              > http://jaydedman.com
                              > http://twitter.com/jaydedman
                              > 917 371 6790
                              >
                              >
                              > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                              >
                            • Michael Sullivan
                              i d like to see a bit of experimentation in collaborative video assignments again. all it requires is a simple database of participants that can toggle on/off
                              Message 14 of 16 , Sep 10, 2009
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                                i'd like to see a bit of experimentation in collaborative video assignments
                                again.
                                all it requires is a simple database of participants that can toggle on/off
                                their availability.
                                keep it simple, but could also apply interests, tags and other profile info.
                                someone starts a project based on a theme and kicks it off with a short
                                video.. 5-10 minutes maybe.
                                this is the beginning of a multi-perspective documentary.
                                each contributor hands off the film to someone they pick from the database
                                of vloggers.
                                you can get funky and allow a vlogger to fork the topic or even hand off to
                                someone not in the database that they meet or know (can be added to the db
                                at that point).
                                you set some rules or guidelines for the project.

                                people watch as its made and in the end, their is a stitched and possibly
                                further edited final version that can be re-distributed and packaged etc.

                                several of these can concurrently progress, creating a network.

                                and this brings us back to the origins, doesnt it?
                                and that would be a nice effect.

                                their are no shortage of topics to delve into that bleed into the lives of
                                people around the world.



                                On Fri, Sep 4, 2009 at 3:49 AM, Rupert Howe <rupert@...> wrote:

                                >
                                >
                                > I guess they do apply to barriers that keep videobloggers from working
                                > on longer documentary projects...
                                > But more directly, these thoughts arose from conversations about why
                                > lots more people weren't making videos about things outside themselves
                                > - in their local communities, say. Both videobloggers and just
                                > ordinary people. Even in short web-based videoblog format or on
                                > YouTube.
                                >
                                >
                                >


                                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                              • RANDY MANN
                                any one up for a new meeting tomorow? is there a wiki set up? randy ... [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                Message 15 of 16 , Sep 11, 2009
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                                  any one up for a new meeting tomorow? is there a wiki set up?

                                  randy

                                  On Fri, Sep 11, 2009 at 2:54 AM, Michael Sullivan <sulleleven@...>wrote:

                                  >
                                  >
                                  > i'd like to see a bit of experimentation in collaborative video assignments
                                  > again.
                                  > all it requires is a simple database of participants that can toggle on/off
                                  > their availability.
                                  > keep it simple, but could also apply interests, tags and other profile
                                  > info.
                                  > someone starts a project based on a theme and kicks it off with a short
                                  > video.. 5-10 minutes maybe.
                                  > this is the beginning of a multi-perspective documentary.
                                  > each contributor hands off the film to someone they pick from the database
                                  > of vloggers.
                                  > you can get funky and allow a vlogger to fork the topic or even hand off to
                                  > someone not in the database that they meet or know (can be added to the db
                                  > at that point).
                                  > you set some rules or guidelines for the project.
                                  >
                                  > people watch as its made and in the end, their is a stitched and possibly
                                  > further edited final version that can be re-distributed and packaged etc.
                                  >
                                  > several of these can concurrently progress, creating a network.
                                  >
                                  > and this brings us back to the origins, doesnt it?
                                  > and that would be a nice effect.
                                  >
                                  > their are no shortage of topics to delve into that bleed into the lives of
                                  > people around the world.
                                  >
                                  >
                                  > On Fri, Sep 4, 2009 at 3:49 AM, Rupert Howe <rupert@...<rupert%40twittervlog.tv>>
                                  > wrote:
                                  >
                                  > >
                                  > >
                                  > > I guess they do apply to barriers that keep videobloggers from working
                                  > > on longer documentary projects...
                                  > > But more directly, these thoughts arose from conversations about why
                                  > > lots more people weren't making videos about things outside themselves
                                  > > - in their local communities, say. Both videobloggers and just
                                  > > ordinary people. Even in short web-based videoblog format or on
                                  > > YouTube.
                                  > >
                                  > >
                                  > >
                                  >
                                  > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                  >
                                  >
                                  >


                                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                • Jan McLaughlin
                                  Great discussion. Have been working on a digitally-based (and world-based) multi-media documentary forever. It keeps shape-shifting, etc., but definitely want
                                  Message 16 of 16 , Sep 13, 2009
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                                    Great discussion.

                                    Have been working on a digitally-based (and world-based) multi-media
                                    documentary forever.

                                    It keeps shape-shifting, etc., but definitely want it to exist as a
                                    documentary motion picture.

                                    Here it is, so far:

                                    http://depressionstrategies.blogspot.com/2008/12/worlds-longest-open-love-letter.html

                                    Using Blip.tv's show player to drag and drop vlog entries around, in and
                                    out. It's at a point where I need more brains involved. That stopped me.
                                    When I had some money, spent it on an editor / blogger / cinematographer
                                    (thanks @Quirk).

                                    Stopped for work and frustration at where to go. It will begin eventually.
                                    Probably in January when the work dries up.

                                    It's really fucking difficult.

                                    Jan

                                    Jan McLaughlin
                                    Production Sound Mixer
                                    air = 862-571-5334
                                    aim = janofsound
                                    skype = janmclaughlin


                                    On Fri, Sep 4, 2009 at 12:21 AM, Adrian Miles <adrian.miles@...>wrote:

                                    > interesting points. :-)
                                    >
                                    > the other side of this of course is that some do both, but that one
                                    > practice might not need to come into the other (if that makes sense).
                                    > the web as most of the 2.0 stuff shows, is ideal for serial practice/
                                    > production, small pieces, loose connections. about networks, joins,
                                    > pathways and bite sized up to snack sized. this can and should work
                                    > really well in doco, but as noted in some of the comments, a lot of
                                    > doco practice is still about much larger scale works. So for me the
                                    > questions are:
                                    >
                                    > 1. what would a web native video doc be? (Seth Keen is answering this
                                    > one way, Florian Thalhofer another.)
                                    > 2. how might this be combined with trad. doco?
                                    > 3. blogs are already documentary, so what needs to change (in us or
                                    > the maker) to think of it more formerly as documentary in the video
                                    > mode?
                                    >
                                    >
                                    > On 04/09/2009, at 9:18 AM, Jay dedman wrote:
                                    >
                                    > > And to flip it around....what barriers keep videobloggers from
                                    > > working on
                                    > > longer projects like documentarians?
                                    > > Rupert and I were just talking about it and he sent me this list (
                                    > > http://videoblogginggroup.pbworks.com/Barriers):
                                    >
                                    >
                                    > cheers
                                    > Adrian Miles
                                    > adrian.miles@...
                                    > Program Director, Bachelor of Communication Honours
                                    > vogmae.net.au
                                    >
                                    >
                                    >
                                    > ------------------------------------
                                    >
                                    > Yahoo! Groups Links
                                    >
                                    >
                                    >
                                    >


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