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Re: [videoblogging] Working with multiple cameras

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  • Richard Amirault
    ... From: J. Rhett Aultman (snip) ... Another technique is to start both cameras .. and LET THEM BOTH RUN .. until either the tape runs out or the event is
    Message 1 of 3 , Jun 2, 2008
      ----- Original Message -----
      From: "J. Rhett Aultman"
      (snip)
      > So, now I have two camcorders, and this means that, light conditions
      > permitting, I'm doing more multiple-camera stuff. I just got done
      > stitching together most of the footage from my first major multi-camera
      > piece, and I've been noticing how much of my time goes syncing up the
      > two cameras. Picking the right camera at the right time? That's easy.
      > But every clip must by synced for both cameras before I can do that.
      >
      > I'm lucky that this is a sporting event with a lot of referee whistles,
      > so I can use that to get two shots in sync, but it's still fairly
      > tedious and time consuming. I'm curious...is there a better way to be
      > doing this? I realize now why it's so much easier to run all the
      > cameras to a common control room and have a director calling out the
      > camera to switch to.

      Another technique is to start both cameras .. and LET THEM BOTH RUN .. until
      either the tape runs out or the event is over.

      That way you sync up once, at the beginning, and then it should be fine for
      the whole tape. Depending on the type of shoot you may end up throwing away
      (editing out) a LOT of footage .. but it is a valid technique.

      Richard Amirault
      Boston, MA, USA
      http://n1jdu.org
      http://bostonfandom.org
      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J7hf9u2ZdlQ
    • Bill Cammack
      100,000 gazillion percent agreed with Richard on letting the cameras run. :D Tape is cheap compared to hours of an editor sitting there figuring out which
      Message 2 of 3 , Jun 2, 2008
        100,000 gazillion percent agreed with Richard on letting the cameras
        run. :D

        Tape is cheap compared to hours of an editor sitting there figuring
        out which section of your footage matches which other section. Even
        if you're doing it yourself, it's a waste of your time, where you
        could be working on other projects or making THIS project better.

        Leave the cameras running. If you need to, stand somewhere where both
        cameras can see you and clap once so that both cameras get the sound
        and both cameras see your hands come together. When it's time to
        edit, load both 1-hour tapes fully to your drives, line up or
        multiclip the claps and work from there. The time savings are well
        worth it.

        It's not exactly on-topic, but here's a two-camera shoot I did with
        Bre Pettis <http://brepettis.com> and Justin Day <http://blip.tv> =>
        <http://billcammack.com/2008/05/06/blip-on-blip-24-bre-pettis-making-internet-video/>

        Same principle. Start the cameras, let them roll, drop all the
        unwanted footage on the cutting room floor.

        Bill Cammack
        http://billcammack.com

        --- In videoblogging@yahoogroups.com, "Richard Amirault"
        <ramirault@...> wrote:
        >
        > ----- Original Message -----
        > From: "J. Rhett Aultman"
        > (snip)
        > > So, now I have two camcorders, and this means that, light conditions
        > > permitting, I'm doing more multiple-camera stuff. I just got done
        > > stitching together most of the footage from my first major
        multi-camera
        > > piece, and I've been noticing how much of my time goes syncing up the
        > > two cameras. Picking the right camera at the right time? That's
        easy.
        > > But every clip must by synced for both cameras before I can do that.
        > >
        > > I'm lucky that this is a sporting event with a lot of referee
        whistles,
        > > so I can use that to get two shots in sync, but it's still fairly
        > > tedious and time consuming. I'm curious...is there a better way to be
        > > doing this? I realize now why it's so much easier to run all the
        > > cameras to a common control room and have a director calling out the
        > > camera to switch to.
        >
        > Another technique is to start both cameras .. and LET THEM BOTH RUN
        .. until
        > either the tape runs out or the event is over.
        >
        > That way you sync up once, at the beginning, and then it should be
        fine for
        > the whole tape. Depending on the type of shoot you may end up
        throwing away
        > (editing out) a LOT of footage .. but it is a valid technique.
        >
        > Richard Amirault
        > Boston, MA, USA
        > http://n1jdu.org
        > http://bostonfandom.org
        > http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J7hf9u2ZdlQ
        >
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