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Re: [videoblogging] The camera is the new gun.

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  • Jan McLaughlin
    Yeah, Ron, I concur: great post. Well, well, well... Cameras = guns. Based upon states recent leaps to control em, you are onto something, particularly if
    Message 1 of 11 , Mar 31 2:44 AM
    • 0 Attachment
      Yeah, Ron, I concur: great post.

      Well, well, well...

      Cameras = guns.

      Based upon states' recent leaps to control 'em, you are onto something,
      particularly if these hand-held projectors will be battery-powered.

      As you might imagine, find this product extremely exciting news.

      Already, images are being projected on sidewalks, floors, walls. Mostly
      logos, single words. Slideshows. Graphical.

      Narrative structure / storytelling will be affected because people are
      deeply resistant to having their audio-space cluttered. Net-net: these
      projected motion pictures will inevitably have to work as silent films.

      There's both rub and irony that in this beginning of the high tech age, we
      return to the silent film.

      Perhaps advertisers will have Bluetooth-available audio? Perhaps if the
      motion pictures are delivered via the web, one might stream the audio over
      one's cell phone. The challenge would be to sync the sound.

      I'm on fire with possibility.

      Thanks.
      Jan




      On Mon, Mar 31, 2008 at 3:08 AM, Ron Watson <k9disc@...> wrote:

      > Great post, Mike!
      >
      > I can't wait to get my hands on one of those little projectors!
      >
      > I share your concern with the ubiquity of advertising, but
      >
      > "The camera is the new gun."
      >
      > Is a HUGE statement!
      >
      > I think it is. One camera can take down a government.
      >
      > Cheers,
      >
      > Ron Watson
      > http://k9disc.blip.tv
      > http://k9disc.com
      > http://discdogradio.com
      > http://pawsitivevybe.com
      >
      >
      >
      > On Mar 30, 2008, at 7:29 PM, Mike Meiser wrote:
      >
      > > One of my favorite things about pixelodeon was not the set
      > > screening room
      > > sessions but the widespread use of 17 macbooks for impromptu
      > > screening of
      > > all manner of videos over beers, at party's or simply gatherings in
      > > hotel
      > > rooms.
      > >
      > > It's these shared interactive viewing experiences that really make
      > > video
      > > come full circle as a part of real world face to face conversations.
      > >
      > > If the following nytimes article is correct pocket-able projection
      > > units are
      > > expected to hit the market by years end at $300-350. This could in
      > > 2009
      > > usher in a whole new possibility for impromptu video screenings.
      > >
      > > http://www.nytimes.com/2008/03/30/business/30novelties.html
      > >
      > > I'd be curious to know if anyone has gotten their hands on any early
      > > prototypes yet.
      > >
      > > Perhaps there is some potential for sponsorship here at future video
      > > blogging events.
      > >
      > > Of course, cheap portable projectors could have far more
      > > ramifications then
      > > simple video blog screenings.
      > >
      > > I cannot begin to imagine how useful these things might become in
      > > the next 5
      > > years.
      > >
      > > As they get cheaper they could one day become as common in laptops
      > > as video
      > > cams are now, and they have some interesting ramifications as
      > > secondary
      > > information displays for "ambient" information such as twitter,
      > > friend feed,
      > > Digg Spy, news, weather, and things we have yet to dream up.
      > >
      > > If they become ubiquitous enough they could further blur the spacial
      > > boundaries between office chair and arm chair, or put in other
      > > terms between
      > > computer screen and tv.
      > >
      > > As an information architect I find this prospect of a more ubiquitous
      > > physical information space fascinating.
      > >
      > > Anyone who has ever been on a trading room floor at an exchange
      > > will know
      > > what I'm talking about by ubiquitous information space.
      > >
      > > Or for that matter anyone who's watched a scifi movie where whole
      > > walls are
      > > information displays.
      > >
      > > Geography / real world space is the new frontier of cyberspace / media
      > > space. We've brought meat space to cyberspace, now we're increasingly
      > > bringing cyberspace back to meat space.
      > >
      > > This has tremendous implications for memory, productivity, and
      > > privacy.
      > >
      > > If the medium is the message, such bringing of video to meat space
      > > means
      > > that today's trends such as the personal and non-linear nature of
      > > videos
      > > will be nothing in comparison o the non-linearity and personal
      > > nature media
      > > created for this eventual future. Video made to be projected
      > > ubiquitously
      > > into the real world will have to be more non-linear, and in order
      > > to grab
      > > our attention be more personal then ever. The narrative will be ever
      > > increasingly abstracted and exploded. TV shows like south park, the
      > > simpsons and so called "reality tv" that are increasingly dependant on
      > > direct references to larger narratives in culture rather then their
      > > own sub
      > > plots will look as quaint as Leave it to Beaver in coming years.
      > > This goes
      > > for MTV's non-linear programing as well.
      > >
      > > It also means our notions of information overload today will quaint in
      > > comparison to those of tomorrow.
      > >
      > > Case in point these cheap tiny projectors are not just consumer
      > > technology.
      > > They may be used to assault our senses in yet new ways. They are
      > > perfect
      > > for projecting advertising in all manner of unpredictable spaces...
      > > subways,
      > > public bathrooms, elevators and more since they will be much
      > > cheaper, easier
      > > to install, and easier to secure then today's ad display systems.
      > >
      > > Of course a simple piece of gum will become a great weapon for
      > > future ad
      > > busters. :)
      > >
      > > I'm reminded of Jan of Faux Press's ideas of "vlogvertising".
      > >
      > > We artists mine as well be the first to explore and exploit this newly
      > > opening media space.
      > >
      > > My dream of widespread true traditional gallery spaces for video
      > > blogging
      > > will increasingly become possible, even probable.
      > >
      > > Of course my 1984 type prediction is projected media will one day
      > > be as
      > > ubiquitous at assaulting our senses as video cam's are already
      > > becoming at
      > > recording our every action.
      > >
      > > My answer to that is we as citizens must preserve our right to give
      > > as well
      > > as we get in this future. Such is the important front line of the
      > > battle
      > > with public photography and graffiti. The right to arm oneself with
      > > a camera
      > > should be as protected as the right to free speech, or even more so
      > > then our
      > > right to Carry a gun. The camera is the new gun.
      > >
      > > I'm continually reminded of William Burrough's "Apocalypse". Art
      > > leaps from
      > > its frames.
      > >
      > > A whole new frontier is starting to open for media space.
      > >
      > > And you thought all the real innovation had already happened.
      > >
      > > P.S. Don't even get me started on on 3D holographic projection. ;)
      > >
      > > -Mike
      > > mmeiser.com/blog
      > >
      > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      > >
      > >
      > >
      >
      >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
      >
      > ------------------------------------
      >
      > Yahoo! Groups Links
      >
      >
      >
      >


      --
      The Faux Press - by whatever media necessary
      http://feeds.feedburner.com/diaryofafauxjournalist - RSS
      http://fauxpress.blogspot.com
      aim=janofsound
      air=862.571.5334
      skype=janmclaughlin


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Ron Watson
      ... What a strange new world, eh? So interesting... These laws are yet another affront to a citizen s media. I ve no desire to bring up another
      Message 2 of 11 , Mar 31 4:05 AM
      • 0 Attachment
        > There's both rub and irony that in this beginning of the high tech
        > age, we
        > return to the silent film.
        >
        > Perhaps advertisers will have Bluetooth-available audio? Perhaps if
        > the
        > motion pictures are delivered via the web, one might stream the
        > audio over
        > one's cell phone. The challenge would be to sync the sound.

        What a strange new world, eh?

        So interesting...

        These laws are yet another affront to a citizen's media.

        I've no desire to bring up another 'Net-Neutrality' and 'Crushing
        independent content producers' argument, in fact I'm done with
        argument, so I'll just say what I want to say and shut my mouth.

        I find the removal of cameras and criminalization of camera use in
        public spaces to be very interesting, and it seems to me that this is
        the State 'Crushing' the independent content creators. I wonder if
        this will bring the defenders of the Corporate agenda, and their lack
        of desire to crush independent content creators to the discussion.

        In an era of 'It's the Economy Stupid', a Cheap Labor Economy, and
        feeding people to the Economy, I see no difference between the
        authoritarian control by the State and need to feed a Corporate Grow
        or Die agenda. It's the same thing. They are entirely dependent upon
        eachother.

        See, I am attacking the government for the same damn thing. I am,
        however, not attacking the idea of government, just as I was not
        attacking the idea of economy. Both are absolute perversions of their
        foundational concepts. They are extremely unhealthy, BOTH of them.
        We've got to fix them - BOTH.

        They are becoming one and the same, and I wish I could be more
        persuasive because, like Global Warming, the environment, perpetual
        war and the destruction of Democracy, once it's readily apparent,
        it's too friggin' late.

        It's so naked, how can people not see it.

        blech...

        Ron





        On Mar 31, 2008, at 5:44 AM, Jan McLaughlin wrote:

        > Yeah, Ron, I concur: great post.
        >
        > Well, well, well...
        >
        > Cameras = guns.
        >
        > Based upon states' recent leaps to control 'em, you are onto
        > something,
        > particularly if these hand-held projectors will be battery-powered.
        >
        > As you might imagine, find this product extremely exciting news.
        >
        > Already, images are being projected on sidewalks, floors, walls.
        > Mostly
        > logos, single words. Slideshows. Graphical.
        >
        > Narrative structure / storytelling will be affected because people are
        > deeply resistant to having their audio-space cluttered. Net-net: these
        > projected motion pictures will inevitably have to work as silent
        > films.
        >
        > There's both rub and irony that in this beginning of the high tech
        > age, we
        > return to the silent film.
        >
        > Perhaps advertisers will have Bluetooth-available audio? Perhaps if
        > the
        > motion pictures are delivered via the web, one might stream the
        > audio over
        > one's cell phone. The challenge would be to sync the sound.
        >
        > I'm on fire with possibility.
        >
        > Thanks.
        > Jan
        >
        > On Mon, Mar 31, 2008 at 3:08 AM, Ron Watson <k9disc@...> wrote:
        >
        > > Great post, Mike!
        > >
        > > I can't wait to get my hands on one of those little projectors!
        > >
        > > I share your concern with the ubiquity of advertising, but
        > >
        > > "The camera is the new gun."
        > >
        > > Is a HUGE statement!
        > >
        > > I think it is. One camera can take down a government.
        > >
        > > Cheers,
        > >
        > > Ron Watson
        > > http://k9disc.blip.tv
        > > http://k9disc.com
        > > http://discdogradio.com
        > > http://pawsitivevybe.com
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > On Mar 30, 2008, at 7:29 PM, Mike Meiser wrote:
        > >
        > > > One of my favorite things about pixelodeon was not the set
        > > > screening room
        > > > sessions but the widespread use of 17 macbooks for impromptu
        > > > screening of
        > > > all manner of videos over beers, at party's or simply
        > gatherings in
        > > > hotel
        > > > rooms.
        > > >
        > > > It's these shared interactive viewing experiences that really make
        > > > video
        > > > come full circle as a part of real world face to face
        > conversations.
        > > >
        > > > If the following nytimes article is correct pocket-able projection
        > > > units are
        > > > expected to hit the market by years end at $300-350. This could in
        > > > 2009
        > > > usher in a whole new possibility for impromptu video screenings.
        > > >
        > > > http://www.nytimes.com/2008/03/30/business/30novelties.html
        > > >
        > > > I'd be curious to know if anyone has gotten their hands on any
        > early
        > > > prototypes yet.
        > > >
        > > > Perhaps there is some potential for sponsorship here at future
        > video
        > > > blogging events.
        > > >
        > > > Of course, cheap portable projectors could have far more
        > > > ramifications then
        > > > simple video blog screenings.
        > > >
        > > > I cannot begin to imagine how useful these things might become in
        > > > the next 5
        > > > years.
        > > >
        > > > As they get cheaper they could one day become as common in laptops
        > > > as video
        > > > cams are now, and they have some interesting ramifications as
        > > > secondary
        > > > information displays for "ambient" information such as twitter,
        > > > friend feed,
        > > > Digg Spy, news, weather, and things we have yet to dream up.
        > > >
        > > > If they become ubiquitous enough they could further blur the
        > spacial
        > > > boundaries between office chair and arm chair, or put in other
        > > > terms between
        > > > computer screen and tv.
        > > >
        > > > As an information architect I find this prospect of a more
        > ubiquitous
        > > > physical information space fascinating.
        > > >
        > > > Anyone who has ever been on a trading room floor at an exchange
        > > > will know
        > > > what I'm talking about by ubiquitous information space.
        > > >
        > > > Or for that matter anyone who's watched a scifi movie where whole
        > > > walls are
        > > > information displays.
        > > >
        > > > Geography / real world space is the new frontier of
        > cyberspace / media
        > > > space. We've brought meat space to cyberspace, now we're
        > increasingly
        > > > bringing cyberspace back to meat space.
        > > >
        > > > This has tremendous implications for memory, productivity, and
        > > > privacy.
        > > >
        > > > If the medium is the message, such bringing of video to meat space
        > > > means
        > > > that today's trends such as the personal and non-linear nature of
        > > > videos
        > > > will be nothing in comparison o the non-linearity and personal
        > > > nature media
        > > > created for this eventual future. Video made to be projected
        > > > ubiquitously
        > > > into the real world will have to be more non-linear, and in order
        > > > to grab
        > > > our attention be more personal then ever. The narrative will be
        > ever
        > > > increasingly abstracted and exploded. TV shows like south park,
        > the
        > > > simpsons and so called "reality tv" that are increasingly
        > dependant on
        > > > direct references to larger narratives in culture rather then
        > their
        > > > own sub
        > > > plots will look as quaint as Leave it to Beaver in coming years.
        > > > This goes
        > > > for MTV's non-linear programing as well.
        > > >
        > > > It also means our notions of information overload today will
        > quaint in
        > > > comparison to those of tomorrow.
        > > >
        > > > Case in point these cheap tiny projectors are not just consumer
        > > > technology.
        > > > They may be used to assault our senses in yet new ways. They are
        > > > perfect
        > > > for projecting advertising in all manner of unpredictable
        > spaces...
        > > > subways,
        > > > public bathrooms, elevators and more since they will be much
        > > > cheaper, easier
        > > > to install, and easier to secure then today's ad display systems.
        > > >
        > > > Of course a simple piece of gum will become a great weapon for
        > > > future ad
        > > > busters. :)
        > > >
        > > > I'm reminded of Jan of Faux Press's ideas of "vlogvertising".
        > > >
        > > > We artists mine as well be the first to explore and exploit
        > this newly
        > > > opening media space.
        > > >
        > > > My dream of widespread true traditional gallery spaces for video
        > > > blogging
        > > > will increasingly become possible, even probable.
        > > >
        > > > Of course my 1984 type prediction is projected media will one day
        > > > be as
        > > > ubiquitous at assaulting our senses as video cam's are already
        > > > becoming at
        > > > recording our every action.
        > > >
        > > > My answer to that is we as citizens must preserve our right to
        > give
        > > > as well
        > > > as we get in this future. Such is the important front line of the
        > > > battle
        > > > with public photography and graffiti. The right to arm oneself
        > with
        > > > a camera
        > > > should be as protected as the right to free speech, or even
        > more so
        > > > then our
        > > > right to Carry a gun. The camera is the new gun.
        > > >
        > > > I'm continually reminded of William Burrough's "Apocalypse". Art
        > > > leaps from
        > > > its frames.
        > > >
        > > > A whole new frontier is starting to open for media space.
        > > >
        > > > And you thought all the real innovation had already happened.
        > > >
        > > > P.S. Don't even get me started on on 3D holographic projection. ;)
        > > >
        > > > -Mike
        > > > mmeiser.com/blog
        > > >
        > > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        > > >
        > > >
        > > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        > >
        > >
        > > ------------------------------------
        > >
        > > Yahoo! Groups Links
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        >
        > --
        > The Faux Press - by whatever media necessary
        > http://feeds.feedburner.com/diaryofafauxjournalist - RSS
        > http://fauxpress.blogspot.com
        > aim=janofsound
        > air=862.571.5334
        > skype=janmclaughlin
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
        >
        >



        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Steve Watkins
        Yay very interesting post :) Ive had half an eye on these small projectors for some years. There is currently a massive flaw in their spec. They arent bright
        Message 3 of 11 , Mar 31 11:57 AM
        • 0 Attachment
          Yay very interesting post :)

          Ive had half an eye on these small projectors for some years. There is
          currently a massive flaw in their spec. They arent bright enough, by a
          large factor. Its unclear whether they will be able to overcome this
          in the next few years or not. If they do, then this has even larger
          implications for how we light the world in general - if you get a
          bright enough battery powered projector then that implies a new
          ultra-bright LED or something that could further lower the watts
          required for normal lighting, which is a bigger concern for humanity
          overall then the novelty of projection.

          As for audio, technology has been developed to deliver audio to a
          specific point in space. Currently its used for military/police
          applications such as crowd control, but if it lives up to the hype
          then many advertising execs are salivating at the potential.

          Cheers

          Steve Elbows

          --- In videoblogging@yahoogroups.com, "Jan McLaughlin"
          <jannie.jan@...> wrote:
          >
          > Yeah, Ron, I concur: great post.
          >
          > Well, well, well...
          >
          > Cameras = guns.
          >
          > Based upon states' recent leaps to control 'em, you are onto something,
          > particularly if these hand-held projectors will be battery-powered.
          >
          > As you might imagine, find this product extremely exciting news.
          >
          > Already, images are being projected on sidewalks, floors, walls. Mostly
          > logos, single words. Slideshows. Graphical.
          >
          > Narrative structure / storytelling will be affected because people are
          > deeply resistant to having their audio-space cluttered. Net-net: these
          > projected motion pictures will inevitably have to work as silent films.
          >
          > There's both rub and irony that in this beginning of the high tech
          age, we
          > return to the silent film.
          >
          > Perhaps advertisers will have Bluetooth-available audio? Perhaps if the
          > motion pictures are delivered via the web, one might stream the
          audio over
          > one's cell phone. The challenge would be to sync the sound.
          >
          > I'm on fire with possibility.
          >
          > Thanks.
          > Jan
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > On Mon, Mar 31, 2008 at 3:08 AM, Ron Watson <k9disc@...> wrote:
          >
          > > Great post, Mike!
          > >
          > > I can't wait to get my hands on one of those little projectors!
          > >
          > > I share your concern with the ubiquity of advertising, but
          > >
          > > "The camera is the new gun."
          > >
          > > Is a HUGE statement!
          > >
          > > I think it is. One camera can take down a government.
          > >
          > > Cheers,
          > >
          > > Ron Watson
          > > http://k9disc.blip.tv
          > > http://k9disc.com
          > > http://discdogradio.com
          > > http://pawsitivevybe.com
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > > On Mar 30, 2008, at 7:29 PM, Mike Meiser wrote:
          > >
          > > > One of my favorite things about pixelodeon was not the set
          > > > screening room
          > > > sessions but the widespread use of 17 macbooks for impromptu
          > > > screening of
          > > > all manner of videos over beers, at party's or simply gatherings in
          > > > hotel
          > > > rooms.
          > > >
          > > > It's these shared interactive viewing experiences that really make
          > > > video
          > > > come full circle as a part of real world face to face conversations.
          > > >
          > > > If the following nytimes article is correct pocket-able projection
          > > > units are
          > > > expected to hit the market by years end at $300-350. This could in
          > > > 2009
          > > > usher in a whole new possibility for impromptu video screenings.
          > > >
          > > > http://www.nytimes.com/2008/03/30/business/30novelties.html
          > > >
          > > > I'd be curious to know if anyone has gotten their hands on any early
          > > > prototypes yet.
          > > >
          > > > Perhaps there is some potential for sponsorship here at future video
          > > > blogging events.
          > > >
          > > > Of course, cheap portable projectors could have far more
          > > > ramifications then
          > > > simple video blog screenings.
          > > >
          > > > I cannot begin to imagine how useful these things might become in
          > > > the next 5
          > > > years.
          > > >
          > > > As they get cheaper they could one day become as common in laptops
          > > > as video
          > > > cams are now, and they have some interesting ramifications as
          > > > secondary
          > > > information displays for "ambient" information such as twitter,
          > > > friend feed,
          > > > Digg Spy, news, weather, and things we have yet to dream up.
          > > >
          > > > If they become ubiquitous enough they could further blur the spacial
          > > > boundaries between office chair and arm chair, or put in other
          > > > terms between
          > > > computer screen and tv.
          > > >
          > > > As an information architect I find this prospect of a more
          ubiquitous
          > > > physical information space fascinating.
          > > >
          > > > Anyone who has ever been on a trading room floor at an exchange
          > > > will know
          > > > what I'm talking about by ubiquitous information space.
          > > >
          > > > Or for that matter anyone who's watched a scifi movie where whole
          > > > walls are
          > > > information displays.
          > > >
          > > > Geography / real world space is the new frontier of cyberspace /
          media
          > > > space. We've brought meat space to cyberspace, now we're
          increasingly
          > > > bringing cyberspace back to meat space.
          > > >
          > > > This has tremendous implications for memory, productivity, and
          > > > privacy.
          > > >
          > > > If the medium is the message, such bringing of video to meat space
          > > > means
          > > > that today's trends such as the personal and non-linear nature of
          > > > videos
          > > > will be nothing in comparison o the non-linearity and personal
          > > > nature media
          > > > created for this eventual future. Video made to be projected
          > > > ubiquitously
          > > > into the real world will have to be more non-linear, and in order
          > > > to grab
          > > > our attention be more personal then ever. The narrative will be ever
          > > > increasingly abstracted and exploded. TV shows like south park, the
          > > > simpsons and so called "reality tv" that are increasingly
          dependant on
          > > > direct references to larger narratives in culture rather then their
          > > > own sub
          > > > plots will look as quaint as Leave it to Beaver in coming years.
          > > > This goes
          > > > for MTV's non-linear programing as well.
          > > >
          > > > It also means our notions of information overload today will
          quaint in
          > > > comparison to those of tomorrow.
          > > >
          > > > Case in point these cheap tiny projectors are not just consumer
          > > > technology.
          > > > They may be used to assault our senses in yet new ways. They are
          > > > perfect
          > > > for projecting advertising in all manner of unpredictable spaces...
          > > > subways,
          > > > public bathrooms, elevators and more since they will be much
          > > > cheaper, easier
          > > > to install, and easier to secure then today's ad display systems.
          > > >
          > > > Of course a simple piece of gum will become a great weapon for
          > > > future ad
          > > > busters. :)
          > > >
          > > > I'm reminded of Jan of Faux Press's ideas of "vlogvertising".
          > > >
          > > > We artists mine as well be the first to explore and exploit this
          newly
          > > > opening media space.
          > > >
          > > > My dream of widespread true traditional gallery spaces for video
          > > > blogging
          > > > will increasingly become possible, even probable.
          > > >
          > > > Of course my 1984 type prediction is projected media will one day
          > > > be as
          > > > ubiquitous at assaulting our senses as video cam's are already
          > > > becoming at
          > > > recording our every action.
          > > >
          > > > My answer to that is we as citizens must preserve our right to give
          > > > as well
          > > > as we get in this future. Such is the important front line of the
          > > > battle
          > > > with public photography and graffiti. The right to arm oneself with
          > > > a camera
          > > > should be as protected as the right to free speech, or even more so
          > > > then our
          > > > right to Carry a gun. The camera is the new gun.
          > > >
          > > > I'm continually reminded of William Burrough's "Apocalypse". Art
          > > > leaps from
          > > > its frames.
          > > >
          > > > A whole new frontier is starting to open for media space.
          > > >
          > > > And you thought all the real innovation had already happened.
          > > >
          > > > P.S. Don't even get me started on on 3D holographic projection. ;)
          > > >
          > > > -Mike
          > > > mmeiser.com/blog
          > > >
          > > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          > > >
          > > >
          > > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          > >
          > >
          > > ------------------------------------
          > >
          > > Yahoo! Groups Links
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          >
          >
          > --
          > The Faux Press - by whatever media necessary
          > http://feeds.feedburner.com/diaryofafauxjournalist - RSS
          > http://fauxpress.blogspot.com
          > aim=janofsound
          > air=862.571.5334
          > skype=janmclaughlin
          >
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
        • Steve Watkins
          Well yes the trend towards laws that crackdown on this sort of stuff is alarming, and does not bode well. Frankly I expected even worse by now, recalling that
          Message 4 of 11 , Mar 31 12:32 PM
          • 0 Attachment
            Well yes the trend towards laws that crackdown on this sort of stuff
            is alarming, and does not bode well.

            Frankly I expected even worse by now, recalling that in the first few
            years after 9/11, there were stories about how seemingly innocent
            video of tourist attractions was actually fiendish terrorist planning
            videos. So the London police camera posters fill me with despair but
            the satirical treatment of them gives me some small hope.

            Even without a war on terror moron error, Im not someone who feels too
            comfortable waving a camera round in public, as I know some humans
            feel it is invasive.

            I dont know about the USA but in Britain the internet is commonly
            mentioned on TV news & debate shows in a negative light, paedophiles &
            terrorists, so I just roll my eyes when I see similar tactics in the
            newspapers too.

            Anyway you know I have speculated in the past as to what future our
            governments may be planning for, although its also possible that there
            are more basic motives at work. The police usually want as much power
            as they can get, more laws to be on their side, new weapons and
            evidence gathering devices. Some corporations make the technology that
            suits this paranoid surveillance game, so theres the basic profit
            motive & potential to corrupt government there.

            As for this not arguing anymore, in order for that to work you
            possibly shouldnt mention most of the points argued about, or goading
            those that 'defend the corporate agenda' to respond. Where does my
            position fit into that narrow representation? Because you hopefully
            know that I believe government imposed restrictions that affect
            vlogging are already here in some countries, and remain a real
            possibility at any time in the future. Restriction of such things is
            one of the first things governments tend to do when they feel under
            threat, and even in tines of relative security, its the sort of right
            that ebbs away unless continually fought for. But this would happen in
            a counry without corporations too. And you know I scoff at the idea
            that corporations have an agenda to crush independent media. Mostly
            because they dont need to. Corporations strengths over small business,
            indies, individuals, is part of their design, business as usual
            assures their dominance, they dont need to take extra measures to
            crush. Now over the course of a generation the whole game could change
            because of the internet, but its by no means a cert, and its entirely
            possible they could dominate the net without taking any special
            measures or doing any deliberate crushing.

            I mean really, I am hardly a fan of corporations, I read lots of stuff
            about bad things they do, just as i know small business and government
            also cause bad, as do individuals. Due to their scale, governments and
            corporations can do the harm on a far larger scale, and we have
            greater expectations about what good they should be doing instead. And
            yeah, humans appear to be too hypocritical and corrupt to save the
            world. Some think that if we can only harness the sorts of thinking
            that can happen in war, but in the struggle against climate change and
            resource depletion in a time of peace, we might stand a chance. I fear
            that it will be harnessed through actual war.

            Can anybody imagine the global internet existing as we know it if
            there ws a non-nuclear war on the scale of world war 2 in future? And
            that would also be an end the the complexities of debates about free
            speech, rights to photograph, gossip, whistleblow & be a real
            journalist or citizen? 'Theres a war on' will be the justification for
            everything, and the grumbling will have to be more low-key than we
            have become used to. Now as much as the war on terror effect has been
            used to bring in lots of legislation, and fight a few regionalized
            wars, and although it did cause a lot of critical debate to fall
            silent for several years in the USA, it has not had the huge impact
            that a real world war would actually have on all these issues. So
            whats my message here, 'this is as good as it gets?', 'you aint seen
            nothing yet?'. Hope not.

            Cheers

            Steve Elbows

            --- In videoblogging@yahoogroups.com, Ron Watson <k9disc@...> wrote:

            > What a strange new world, eh?
            >
            > So interesting...
            >
            > These laws are yet another affront to a citizen's media.
            >
            > I've no desire to bring up another 'Net-Neutrality' and 'Crushing
            > independent content producers' argument, in fact I'm done with
            > argument, so I'll just say what I want to say and shut my mouth.
            >
            > I find the removal of cameras and criminalization of camera use in
            > public spaces to be very interesting, and it seems to me that this is
            > the State 'Crushing' the independent content creators. I wonder if
            > this will bring the defenders of the Corporate agenda, and their lack
            > of desire to crush independent content creators to the discussion.
            >
            > In an era of 'It's the Economy Stupid', a Cheap Labor Economy, and
            > feeding people to the Economy, I see no difference between the
            > authoritarian control by the State and need to feed a Corporate Grow
            > or Die agenda. It's the same thing. They are entirely dependent upon
            > eachother.
            >
            > See, I am attacking the government for the same damn thing. I am,
            > however, not attacking the idea of government, just as I was not
            > attacking the idea of economy. Both are absolute perversions of their
            > foundational concepts. They are extremely unhealthy, BOTH of them.
            > We've got to fix them - BOTH.
            >
            > They are becoming one and the same, and I wish I could be more
            > persuasive because, like Global Warming, the environment, perpetual
            > war and the destruction of Democracy, once it's readily apparent,
            > it's too friggin' late.
            >
            > It's so naked, how can people not see it.
            >
            > blech...
            >
            > Ron
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > On Mar 31, 2008, at 5:44 AM, Jan McLaughlin wrote:
            >
            > > Yeah, Ron, I concur: great post.
            > >
            > > Well, well, well...
            > >
            > > Cameras = guns.
            > >
            > > Based upon states' recent leaps to control 'em, you are onto
            > > something,
            > > particularly if these hand-held projectors will be battery-powered.
            > >
            > > As you might imagine, find this product extremely exciting news.
            > >
            > > Already, images are being projected on sidewalks, floors, walls.
            > > Mostly
            > > logos, single words. Slideshows. Graphical.
            > >
            > > Narrative structure / storytelling will be affected because people are
            > > deeply resistant to having their audio-space cluttered. Net-net: these
            > > projected motion pictures will inevitably have to work as silent
            > > films.
            > >
            > > There's both rub and irony that in this beginning of the high tech
            > > age, we
            > > return to the silent film.
            > >
            > > Perhaps advertisers will have Bluetooth-available audio? Perhaps if
            > > the
            > > motion pictures are delivered via the web, one might stream the
            > > audio over
            > > one's cell phone. The challenge would be to sync the sound.
            > >
            > > I'm on fire with possibility.
            > >
            > > Thanks.
            > > Jan
            > >
            > > On Mon, Mar 31, 2008 at 3:08 AM, Ron Watson <k9disc@...> wrote:
            > >
            > > > Great post, Mike!
            > > >
            > > > I can't wait to get my hands on one of those little projectors!
            > > >
            > > > I share your concern with the ubiquity of advertising, but
            > > >
            > > > "The camera is the new gun."
            > > >
            > > > Is a HUGE statement!
            > > >
            > > > I think it is. One camera can take down a government.
            > > >
            > > > Cheers,
            > > >
            > > > Ron Watson
            > > > http://k9disc.blip.tv
            > > > http://k9disc.com
            > > > http://discdogradio.com
            > > > http://pawsitivevybe.com
            > > >
            > > >
            > > >
            > > > On Mar 30, 2008, at 7:29 PM, Mike Meiser wrote:
            > > >
            > > > > One of my favorite things about pixelodeon was not the set
            > > > > screening room
            > > > > sessions but the widespread use of 17 macbooks for impromptu
            > > > > screening of
            > > > > all manner of videos over beers, at party's or simply
            > > gatherings in
            > > > > hotel
            > > > > rooms.
            > > > >
            > > > > It's these shared interactive viewing experiences that really make
            > > > > video
            > > > > come full circle as a part of real world face to face
            > > conversations.
            > > > >
            > > > > If the following nytimes article is correct pocket-able projection
            > > > > units are
            > > > > expected to hit the market by years end at $300-350. This could in
            > > > > 2009
            > > > > usher in a whole new possibility for impromptu video screenings.
            > > > >
            > > > > http://www.nytimes.com/2008/03/30/business/30novelties.html
            > > > >
            > > > > I'd be curious to know if anyone has gotten their hands on any
            > > early
            > > > > prototypes yet.
            > > > >
            > > > > Perhaps there is some potential for sponsorship here at future
            > > video
            > > > > blogging events.
            > > > >
            > > > > Of course, cheap portable projectors could have far more
            > > > > ramifications then
            > > > > simple video blog screenings.
            > > > >
            > > > > I cannot begin to imagine how useful these things might become in
            > > > > the next 5
            > > > > years.
            > > > >
            > > > > As they get cheaper they could one day become as common in laptops
            > > > > as video
            > > > > cams are now, and they have some interesting ramifications as
            > > > > secondary
            > > > > information displays for "ambient" information such as twitter,
            > > > > friend feed,
            > > > > Digg Spy, news, weather, and things we have yet to dream up.
            > > > >
            > > > > If they become ubiquitous enough they could further blur the
            > > spacial
            > > > > boundaries between office chair and arm chair, or put in other
            > > > > terms between
            > > > > computer screen and tv.
            > > > >
            > > > > As an information architect I find this prospect of a more
            > > ubiquitous
            > > > > physical information space fascinating.
            > > > >
            > > > > Anyone who has ever been on a trading room floor at an exchange
            > > > > will know
            > > > > what I'm talking about by ubiquitous information space.
            > > > >
            > > > > Or for that matter anyone who's watched a scifi movie where whole
            > > > > walls are
            > > > > information displays.
            > > > >
            > > > > Geography / real world space is the new frontier of
            > > cyberspace / media
            > > > > space. We've brought meat space to cyberspace, now we're
            > > increasingly
            > > > > bringing cyberspace back to meat space.
            > > > >
            > > > > This has tremendous implications for memory, productivity, and
            > > > > privacy.
            > > > >
            > > > > If the medium is the message, such bringing of video to meat space
            > > > > means
            > > > > that today's trends such as the personal and non-linear nature of
            > > > > videos
            > > > > will be nothing in comparison o the non-linearity and personal
            > > > > nature media
            > > > > created for this eventual future. Video made to be projected
            > > > > ubiquitously
            > > > > into the real world will have to be more non-linear, and in order
            > > > > to grab
            > > > > our attention be more personal then ever. The narrative will be
            > > ever
            > > > > increasingly abstracted and exploded. TV shows like south park,
            > > the
            > > > > simpsons and so called "reality tv" that are increasingly
            > > dependant on
            > > > > direct references to larger narratives in culture rather then
            > > their
            > > > > own sub
            > > > > plots will look as quaint as Leave it to Beaver in coming years.
            > > > > This goes
            > > > > for MTV's non-linear programing as well.
            > > > >
            > > > > It also means our notions of information overload today will
            > > quaint in
            > > > > comparison to those of tomorrow.
            > > > >
            > > > > Case in point these cheap tiny projectors are not just consumer
            > > > > technology.
            > > > > They may be used to assault our senses in yet new ways. They are
            > > > > perfect
            > > > > for projecting advertising in all manner of unpredictable
            > > spaces...
            > > > > subways,
            > > > > public bathrooms, elevators and more since they will be much
            > > > > cheaper, easier
            > > > > to install, and easier to secure then today's ad display systems.
            > > > >
            > > > > Of course a simple piece of gum will become a great weapon for
            > > > > future ad
            > > > > busters. :)
            > > > >
            > > > > I'm reminded of Jan of Faux Press's ideas of "vlogvertising".
            > > > >
            > > > > We artists mine as well be the first to explore and exploit
            > > this newly
            > > > > opening media space.
            > > > >
            > > > > My dream of widespread true traditional gallery spaces for video
            > > > > blogging
            > > > > will increasingly become possible, even probable.
            > > > >
            > > > > Of course my 1984 type prediction is projected media will one day
            > > > > be as
            > > > > ubiquitous at assaulting our senses as video cam's are already
            > > > > becoming at
            > > > > recording our every action.
            > > > >
            > > > > My answer to that is we as citizens must preserve our right to
            > > give
            > > > > as well
            > > > > as we get in this future. Such is the important front line of the
            > > > > battle
            > > > > with public photography and graffiti. The right to arm oneself
            > > with
            > > > > a camera
            > > > > should be as protected as the right to free speech, or even
            > > more so
            > > > > then our
            > > > > right to Carry a gun. The camera is the new gun.
            > > > >
            > > > > I'm continually reminded of William Burrough's "Apocalypse". Art
            > > > > leaps from
            > > > > its frames.
            > > > >
            > > > > A whole new frontier is starting to open for media space.
            > > > >
            > > > > And you thought all the real innovation had already happened.
            > > > >
            > > > > P.S. Don't even get me started on on 3D holographic projection. ;)
            > > > >
            > > > > -Mike
            > > > > mmeiser.com/blog
            > > > >
            > > > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            > > > >
            > > > >
            > > > >
            > > >
            > > >
            > > >
            > > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            > > >
            > > >
            > > > ------------------------------------
            > > >
            > > > Yahoo! Groups Links
            > > >
            > > >
            > > >
            > > >
            > >
            > > --
            > > The Faux Press - by whatever media necessary
            > > http://feeds.feedburner.com/diaryofafauxjournalist - RSS
            > > http://fauxpress.blogspot.com
            > > aim=janofsound
            > > air=862.571.5334
            > > skype=janmclaughlin
            > >
            > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            > >
            > >
            > >
            >
            >
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
          • Jan McLaughlin
            Since we ve gotten political, wanted to bring the newest Lawrence Lessig project to the fore. Lessig, the same fellow who brought you the Creative Commons.
            Message 5 of 11 , Apr 2, 2008
            • 0 Attachment
              Since we've gotten political, wanted to bring the newest Lawrence Lessig
              project to the fore.

              Lessig, the same fellow who brought you the Creative Commons.

              Yeah.

              This new project is http://change-congress.org :

              This non-partisan movement invites members of Congress to agree to:

              1) Support public financing of elections
              2) Support banning earmarks
              3) Swear off taking money from Lobbyiests and PAC's
              4) Support transparency

              If the legislator agrees, Change-Congress will have a digital army ready -
              pledged - to send $X.00 campaign dollars their way.

              Don't agree? No money.

              http://change-congress.org/about/

              Carrots, baby.

              Money talks.

              Jan



              On Mon, Mar 31, 2008 at 3:32 PM, Steve Watkins <steve@...> wrote:

              > Well yes the trend towards laws that crackdown on this sort of stuff
              > is alarming, and does not bode well.
              >
              > Frankly I expected even worse by now, recalling that in the first few
              > years after 9/11, there were stories about how seemingly innocent
              > video of tourist attractions was actually fiendish terrorist planning
              > videos. So the London police camera posters fill me with despair but
              > the satirical treatment of them gives me some small hope.
              >
              > Even without a war on terror moron error, Im not someone who feels too
              > comfortable waving a camera round in public, as I know some humans
              > feel it is invasive.
              >
              > I dont know about the USA but in Britain the internet is commonly
              > mentioned on TV news & debate shows in a negative light, paedophiles &
              > terrorists, so I just roll my eyes when I see similar tactics in the
              > newspapers too.
              >
              > Anyway you know I have speculated in the past as to what future our
              > governments may be planning for, although its also possible that there
              > are more basic motives at work. The police usually want as much power
              > as they can get, more laws to be on their side, new weapons and
              > evidence gathering devices. Some corporations make the technology that
              > suits this paranoid surveillance game, so theres the basic profit
              > motive & potential to corrupt government there.
              >
              > As for this not arguing anymore, in order for that to work you
              > possibly shouldnt mention most of the points argued about, or goading
              > those that 'defend the corporate agenda' to respond. Where does my
              > position fit into that narrow representation? Because you hopefully
              > know that I believe government imposed restrictions that affect
              > vlogging are already here in some countries, and remain a real
              > possibility at any time in the future. Restriction of such things is
              > one of the first things governments tend to do when they feel under
              > threat, and even in tines of relative security, its the sort of right
              > that ebbs away unless continually fought for. But this would happen in
              > a counry without corporations too. And you know I scoff at the idea
              > that corporations have an agenda to crush independent media. Mostly
              > because they dont need to. Corporations strengths over small business,
              > indies, individuals, is part of their design, business as usual
              > assures their dominance, they dont need to take extra measures to
              > crush. Now over the course of a generation the whole game could change
              > because of the internet, but its by no means a cert, and its entirely
              > possible they could dominate the net without taking any special
              > measures or doing any deliberate crushing.
              >
              > I mean really, I am hardly a fan of corporations, I read lots of stuff
              > about bad things they do, just as i know small business and government
              > also cause bad, as do individuals. Due to their scale, governments and
              > corporations can do the harm on a far larger scale, and we have
              > greater expectations about what good they should be doing instead. And
              > yeah, humans appear to be too hypocritical and corrupt to save the
              > world. Some think that if we can only harness the sorts of thinking
              > that can happen in war, but in the struggle against climate change and
              > resource depletion in a time of peace, we might stand a chance. I fear
              > that it will be harnessed through actual war.
              >
              > Can anybody imagine the global internet existing as we know it if
              > there ws a non-nuclear war on the scale of world war 2 in future? And
              > that would also be an end the the complexities of debates about free
              > speech, rights to photograph, gossip, whistleblow & be a real
              > journalist or citizen? 'Theres a war on' will be the justification for
              > everything, and the grumbling will have to be more low-key than we
              > have become used to. Now as much as the war on terror effect has been
              > used to bring in lots of legislation, and fight a few regionalized
              > wars, and although it did cause a lot of critical debate to fall
              > silent for several years in the USA, it has not had the huge impact
              > that a real world war would actually have on all these issues. So
              > whats my message here, 'this is as good as it gets?', 'you aint seen
              > nothing yet?'. Hope not.
              >
              > Cheers
              >
              > Steve Elbows
              >
              > --- In videoblogging@yahoogroups.com, Ron Watson <k9disc@...> wrote:
              >
              > > What a strange new world, eh?
              > >
              > > So interesting...
              > >
              > > These laws are yet another affront to a citizen's media.
              > >
              > > I've no desire to bring up another 'Net-Neutrality' and 'Crushing
              > > independent content producers' argument, in fact I'm done with
              > > argument, so I'll just say what I want to say and shut my mouth.
              > >
              > > I find the removal of cameras and criminalization of camera use in
              > > public spaces to be very interesting, and it seems to me that this is
              > > the State 'Crushing' the independent content creators. I wonder if
              > > this will bring the defenders of the Corporate agenda, and their lack
              > > of desire to crush independent content creators to the discussion.
              > >
              > > In an era of 'It's the Economy Stupid', a Cheap Labor Economy, and
              > > feeding people to the Economy, I see no difference between the
              > > authoritarian control by the State and need to feed a Corporate Grow
              > > or Die agenda. It's the same thing. They are entirely dependent upon
              > > eachother.
              > >
              > > See, I am attacking the government for the same damn thing. I am,
              > > however, not attacking the idea of government, just as I was not
              > > attacking the idea of economy. Both are absolute perversions of their
              > > foundational concepts. They are extremely unhealthy, BOTH of them.
              > > We've got to fix them - BOTH.
              > >
              > > They are becoming one and the same, and I wish I could be more
              > > persuasive because, like Global Warming, the environment, perpetual
              > > war and the destruction of Democracy, once it's readily apparent,
              > > it's too friggin' late.
              > >
              > > It's so naked, how can people not see it.
              > >
              > > blech...
              > >
              > > Ron
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > > On Mar 31, 2008, at 5:44 AM, Jan McLaughlin wrote:
              > >
              > > > Yeah, Ron, I concur: great post.
              > > >
              > > > Well, well, well...
              > > >
              > > > Cameras = guns.
              > > >
              > > > Based upon states' recent leaps to control 'em, you are onto
              > > > something,
              > > > particularly if these hand-held projectors will be battery-powered.
              > > >
              > > > As you might imagine, find this product extremely exciting news.
              > > >
              > > > Already, images are being projected on sidewalks, floors, walls.
              > > > Mostly
              > > > logos, single words. Slideshows. Graphical.
              > > >
              > > > Narrative structure / storytelling will be affected because people are
              > > > deeply resistant to having their audio-space cluttered. Net-net: these
              > > > projected motion pictures will inevitably have to work as silent
              > > > films.
              > > >
              > > > There's both rub and irony that in this beginning of the high tech
              > > > age, we
              > > > return to the silent film.
              > > >
              > > > Perhaps advertisers will have Bluetooth-available audio? Perhaps if
              > > > the
              > > > motion pictures are delivered via the web, one might stream the
              > > > audio over
              > > > one's cell phone. The challenge would be to sync the sound.
              > > >
              > > > I'm on fire with possibility.
              > > >
              > > > Thanks.
              > > > Jan
              > > >
              > > > On Mon, Mar 31, 2008 at 3:08 AM, Ron Watson <k9disc@...> wrote:
              > > >
              > > > > Great post, Mike!
              > > > >
              > > > > I can't wait to get my hands on one of those little projectors!
              > > > >
              > > > > I share your concern with the ubiquity of advertising, but
              > > > >
              > > > > "The camera is the new gun."
              > > > >
              > > > > Is a HUGE statement!
              > > > >
              > > > > I think it is. One camera can take down a government.
              > > > >
              > > > > Cheers,
              > > > >
              > > > > Ron Watson
              > > > > http://k9disc.blip.tv
              > > > > http://k9disc.com
              > > > > http://discdogradio.com
              > > > > http://pawsitivevybe.com
              > > > >
              > > > >
              > > > >
              > > > > On Mar 30, 2008, at 7:29 PM, Mike Meiser wrote:
              > > > >
              > > > > > One of my favorite things about pixelodeon was not the set
              > > > > > screening room
              > > > > > sessions but the widespread use of 17 macbooks for impromptu
              > > > > > screening of
              > > > > > all manner of videos over beers, at party's or simply
              > > > gatherings in
              > > > > > hotel
              > > > > > rooms.
              > > > > >
              > > > > > It's these shared interactive viewing experiences that really make
              > > > > > video
              > > > > > come full circle as a part of real world face to face
              > > > conversations.
              > > > > >
              > > > > > If the following nytimes article is correct pocket-able projection
              > > > > > units are
              > > > > > expected to hit the market by years end at $300-350. This could in
              > > > > > 2009
              > > > > > usher in a whole new possibility for impromptu video screenings.
              > > > > >
              > > > > > http://www.nytimes.com/2008/03/30/business/30novelties.html
              > > > > >
              > > > > > I'd be curious to know if anyone has gotten their hands on any
              > > > early
              > > > > > prototypes yet.
              > > > > >
              > > > > > Perhaps there is some potential for sponsorship here at future
              > > > video
              > > > > > blogging events.
              > > > > >
              > > > > > Of course, cheap portable projectors could have far more
              > > > > > ramifications then
              > > > > > simple video blog screenings.
              > > > > >
              > > > > > I cannot begin to imagine how useful these things might become in
              > > > > > the next 5
              > > > > > years.
              > > > > >
              > > > > > As they get cheaper they could one day become as common in laptops
              > > > > > as video
              > > > > > cams are now, and they have some interesting ramifications as
              > > > > > secondary
              > > > > > information displays for "ambient" information such as twitter,
              > > > > > friend feed,
              > > > > > Digg Spy, news, weather, and things we have yet to dream up.
              > > > > >
              > > > > > If they become ubiquitous enough they could further blur the
              > > > spacial
              > > > > > boundaries between office chair and arm chair, or put in other
              > > > > > terms between
              > > > > > computer screen and tv.
              > > > > >
              > > > > > As an information architect I find this prospect of a more
              > > > ubiquitous
              > > > > > physical information space fascinating.
              > > > > >
              > > > > > Anyone who has ever been on a trading room floor at an exchange
              > > > > > will know
              > > > > > what I'm talking about by ubiquitous information space.
              > > > > >
              > > > > > Or for that matter anyone who's watched a scifi movie where whole
              > > > > > walls are
              > > > > > information displays.
              > > > > >
              > > > > > Geography / real world space is the new frontier of
              > > > cyberspace / media
              > > > > > space. We've brought meat space to cyberspace, now we're
              > > > increasingly
              > > > > > bringing cyberspace back to meat space.
              > > > > >
              > > > > > This has tremendous implications for memory, productivity, and
              > > > > > privacy.
              > > > > >
              > > > > > If the medium is the message, such bringing of video to meat space
              > > > > > means
              > > > > > that today's trends such as the personal and non-linear nature of
              > > > > > videos
              > > > > > will be nothing in comparison o the non-linearity and personal
              > > > > > nature media
              > > > > > created for this eventual future. Video made to be projected
              > > > > > ubiquitously
              > > > > > into the real world will have to be more non-linear, and in order
              > > > > > to grab
              > > > > > our attention be more personal then ever. The narrative will be
              > > > ever
              > > > > > increasingly abstracted and exploded. TV shows like south park,
              > > > the
              > > > > > simpsons and so called "reality tv" that are increasingly
              > > > dependant on
              > > > > > direct references to larger narratives in culture rather then
              > > > their
              > > > > > own sub
              > > > > > plots will look as quaint as Leave it to Beaver in coming years.
              > > > > > This goes
              > > > > > for MTV's non-linear programing as well.
              > > > > >
              > > > > > It also means our notions of information overload today will
              > > > quaint in
              > > > > > comparison to those of tomorrow.
              > > > > >
              > > > > > Case in point these cheap tiny projectors are not just consumer
              > > > > > technology.
              > > > > > They may be used to assault our senses in yet new ways. They are
              > > > > > perfect
              > > > > > for projecting advertising in all manner of unpredictable
              > > > spaces...
              > > > > > subways,
              > > > > > public bathrooms, elevators and more since they will be much
              > > > > > cheaper, easier
              > > > > > to install, and easier to secure then today's ad display systems.
              > > > > >
              > > > > > Of course a simple piece of gum will become a great weapon for
              > > > > > future ad
              > > > > > busters. :)
              > > > > >
              > > > > > I'm reminded of Jan of Faux Press's ideas of "vlogvertising".
              > > > > >
              > > > > > We artists mine as well be the first to explore and exploit
              > > > this newly
              > > > > > opening media space.
              > > > > >
              > > > > > My dream of widespread true traditional gallery spaces for video
              > > > > > blogging
              > > > > > will increasingly become possible, even probable.
              > > > > >
              > > > > > Of course my 1984 type prediction is projected media will one day
              > > > > > be as
              > > > > > ubiquitous at assaulting our senses as video cam's are already
              > > > > > becoming at
              > > > > > recording our every action.
              > > > > >
              > > > > > My answer to that is we as citizens must preserve our right to
              > > > give
              > > > > > as well
              > > > > > as we get in this future. Such is the important front line of the
              > > > > > battle
              > > > > > with public photography and graffiti. The right to arm oneself
              > > > with
              > > > > > a camera
              > > > > > should be as protected as the right to free speech, or even
              > > > more so
              > > > > > then our
              > > > > > right to Carry a gun. The camera is the new gun.
              > > > > >
              > > > > > I'm continually reminded of William Burrough's "Apocalypse". Art
              > > > > > leaps from
              > > > > > its frames.
              > > > > >
              > > > > > A whole new frontier is starting to open for media space.
              > > > > >
              > > > > > And you thought all the real innovation had already happened.
              > > > > >
              > > > > > P.S. Don't even get me started on on 3D holographic projection. ;)
              > > > > >
              > > > > > -Mike
              > > > > > mmeiser.com/blog
              > > > > >
              > > > > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              > > > > >
              > > > > >
              > > > > >
              > > > >
              > > > >
              > > > >
              > > > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              > > > >
              > > > >
              > > > > ------------------------------------
              > > > >
              > > > > Yahoo! Groups Links
              > > > >
              > > > >
              > > > >
              > > > >
              > > >
              > > > --
              > > > The Faux Press - by whatever media necessary
              > > > http://feeds.feedburner.com/diaryofafauxjournalist - RSS
              > > > http://fauxpress.blogspot.com
              > > > aim=janofsound
              > > > air=862.571.5334
              > > > skype=janmclaughlin
              > > >
              > > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              > > >
              > > >
              > > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              > >
              >
              >
              >
              > ------------------------------------
              >
              > Yahoo! Groups Links
              >
              >
              >
              >


              --
              The Faux Press - by whatever media necessary
              http://feeds.feedburner.com/diaryofafauxjournalist - RSS
              http://fauxpress.blogspot.com
              aim=janofsound
              air=862.571.5334
              skype=janmclaughlin


              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Tim Street
              Here s one to add to The Camera is the new gun list: http://tinyurl.com/6r9xwm Men with highly sensitive cameras arrested at airport Tim Street
              Message 6 of 11 , Apr 6, 2008
              • 0 Attachment
                Here's one to add to The Camera is the new gun list:

                http://tinyurl.com/6r9xwm

                Men with 'highly sensitive' cameras arrested at airport



                Tim Street
                Creator/Executive Producer
                French Maid TV
                Subscribe for FREE @
                http://frenchmaidtv.com/itunes
                My Demo Reels &Blog
                http://1timstreet.com







                On Apr 2, 2008, at 9:50 AM, Jan McLaughlin wrote:

                > Since we've gotten political, wanted to bring the newest Lawrence
                > Lessig
                > project to the fore.
                >
                > Lessig, the same fellow who brought you the Creative Commons.
                >
                > Yeah.
                >
                > This new project is http://change-congress.org :
                >
                > This non-partisan movement invites members of Congress to agree to:
                >
                > 1) Support public financing of elections
                > 2) Support banning earmarks
                > 3) Swear off taking money from Lobbyiests and PAC's
                > 4) Support transparency
                >
                > If the legislator agrees, Change-Congress will have a digital army
                > ready -
                > pledged - to send $X.00 campaign dollars their way.
                >
                > Don't agree? No money.
                >
                > http://change-congress.org/about/
                >
                > Carrots, baby.
                >
                > Money talks.
                >
                > Jan
                >
                > On Mon, Mar 31, 2008 at 3:32 PM, Steve Watkins <steve@...>
                > wrote:
                >
                > > Well yes the trend towards laws that crackdown on this sort of stuff
                > > is alarming, and does not bode well.
                > >
                > > Frankly I expected even worse by now, recalling that in the first
                > few
                > > years after 9/11, there were stories about how seemingly innocent
                > > video of tourist attractions was actually fiendish terrorist
                > planning
                > > videos. So the London police camera posters fill me with despair but
                > > the satirical treatment of them gives me some small hope.
                > >
                > > Even without a war on terror moron error, Im not someone who feels
                > too
                > > comfortable waving a camera round in public, as I know some humans
                > > feel it is invasive.
                > >
                > > I dont know about the USA but in Britain the internet is commonly
                > > mentioned on TV news & debate shows in a negative light,
                > paedophiles &
                > > terrorists, so I just roll my eyes when I see similar tactics in the
                > > newspapers too.
                > >
                > > Anyway you know I have speculated in the past as to what future our
                > > governments may be planning for, although its also possible that
                > there
                > > are more basic motives at work. The police usually want as much
                > power
                > > as they can get, more laws to be on their side, new weapons and
                > > evidence gathering devices. Some corporations make the technology
                > that
                > > suits this paranoid surveillance game, so theres the basic profit
                > > motive & potential to corrupt government there.
                > >
                > > As for this not arguing anymore, in order for that to work you
                > > possibly shouldnt mention most of the points argued about, or
                > goading
                > > those that 'defend the corporate agenda' to respond. Where does my
                > > position fit into that narrow representation? Because you hopefully
                > > know that I believe government imposed restrictions that affect
                > > vlogging are already here in some countries, and remain a real
                > > possibility at any time in the future. Restriction of such things is
                > > one of the first things governments tend to do when they feel under
                > > threat, and even in tines of relative security, its the sort of
                > right
                > > that ebbs away unless continually fought for. But this would
                > happen in
                > > a counry without corporations too. And you know I scoff at the idea
                > > that corporations have an agenda to crush independent media. Mostly
                > > because they dont need to. Corporations strengths over small
                > business,
                > > indies, individuals, is part of their design, business as usual
                > > assures their dominance, they dont need to take extra measures to
                > > crush. Now over the course of a generation the whole game could
                > change
                > > because of the internet, but its by no means a cert, and its
                > entirely
                > > possible they could dominate the net without taking any special
                > > measures or doing any deliberate crushing.
                > >
                > > I mean really, I am hardly a fan of corporations, I read lots of
                > stuff
                > > about bad things they do, just as i know small business and
                > government
                > > also cause bad, as do individuals. Due to their scale, governments
                > and
                > > corporations can do the harm on a far larger scale, and we have
                > > greater expectations about what good they should be doing instead.
                > And
                > > yeah, humans appear to be too hypocritical and corrupt to save the
                > > world. Some think that if we can only harness the sorts of thinking
                > > that can happen in war, but in the struggle against climate change
                > and
                > > resource depletion in a time of peace, we might stand a chance. I
                > fear
                > > that it will be harnessed through actual war.
                > >
                > > Can anybody imagine the global internet existing as we know it if
                > > there ws a non-nuclear war on the scale of world war 2 in future?
                > And
                > > that would also be an end the the complexities of debates about free
                > > speech, rights to photograph, gossip, whistleblow & be a real
                > > journalist or citizen? 'Theres a war on' will be the justification
                > for
                > > everything, and the grumbling will have to be more low-key than we
                > > have become used to. Now as much as the war on terror effect has
                > been
                > > used to bring in lots of legislation, and fight a few regionalized
                > > wars, and although it did cause a lot of critical debate to fall
                > > silent for several years in the USA, it has not had the huge impact
                > > that a real world war would actually have on all these issues. So
                > > whats my message here, 'this is as good as it gets?', 'you aint seen
                > > nothing yet?'. Hope not.
                > >
                > > Cheers
                > >
                > > Steve Elbows
                > >
                > > --- In videoblogging@yahoogroups.com, Ron Watson <k9disc@...> wrote:
                > >
                > > > What a strange new world, eh?
                > > >
                > > > So interesting...
                > > >
                > > > These laws are yet another affront to a citizen's media.
                > > >
                > > > I've no desire to bring up another 'Net-Neutrality' and 'Crushing
                > > > independent content producers' argument, in fact I'm done with
                > > > argument, so I'll just say what I want to say and shut my mouth.
                > > >
                > > > I find the removal of cameras and criminalization of camera use in
                > > > public spaces to be very interesting, and it seems to me that
                > this is
                > > > the State 'Crushing' the independent content creators. I wonder if
                > > > this will bring the defenders of the Corporate agenda, and their
                > lack
                > > > of desire to crush independent content creators to the discussion.
                > > >
                > > > In an era of 'It's the Economy Stupid', a Cheap Labor Economy, and
                > > > feeding people to the Economy, I see no difference between the
                > > > authoritarian control by the State and need to feed a Corporate
                > Grow
                > > > or Die agenda. It's the same thing. They are entirely dependent
                > upon
                > > > eachother.
                > > >
                > > > See, I am attacking the government for the same damn thing. I am,
                > > > however, not attacking the idea of government, just as I was not
                > > > attacking the idea of economy. Both are absolute perversions of
                > their
                > > > foundational concepts. They are extremely unhealthy, BOTH of them.
                > > > We've got to fix them - BOTH.
                > > >
                > > > They are becoming one and the same, and I wish I could be more
                > > > persuasive because, like Global Warming, the environment,
                > perpetual
                > > > war and the destruction of Democracy, once it's readily apparent,
                > > > it's too friggin' late.
                > > >
                > > > It's so naked, how can people not see it.
                > > >
                > > > blech...
                > > >
                > > > Ron
                > > >
                > > >
                > > >
                > > >
                > > >
                > > > On Mar 31, 2008, at 5:44 AM, Jan McLaughlin wrote:
                > > >
                > > > > Yeah, Ron, I concur: great post.
                > > > >
                > > > > Well, well, well...
                > > > >
                > > > > Cameras = guns.
                > > > >
                > > > > Based upon states' recent leaps to control 'em, you are onto
                > > > > something,
                > > > > particularly if these hand-held projectors will be battery-
                > powered.
                > > > >
                > > > > As you might imagine, find this product extremely exciting news.
                > > > >
                > > > > Already, images are being projected on sidewalks, floors, walls.
                > > > > Mostly
                > > > > logos, single words. Slideshows. Graphical.
                > > > >
                > > > > Narrative structure / storytelling will be affected because
                > people are
                > > > > deeply resistant to having their audio-space cluttered. Net-
                > net: these
                > > > > projected motion pictures will inevitably have to work as silent
                > > > > films.
                > > > >
                > > > > There's both rub and irony that in this beginning of the high
                > tech
                > > > > age, we
                > > > > return to the silent film.
                > > > >
                > > > > Perhaps advertisers will have Bluetooth-available audio?
                > Perhaps if
                > > > > the
                > > > > motion pictures are delivered via the web, one might stream the
                > > > > audio over
                > > > > one's cell phone. The challenge would be to sync the sound.
                > > > >
                > > > > I'm on fire with possibility.
                > > > >
                > > > > Thanks.
                > > > > Jan
                > > > >
                > > > > On Mon, Mar 31, 2008 at 3:08 AM, Ron Watson <k9disc@...> wrote:
                > > > >
                > > > > > Great post, Mike!
                > > > > >
                > > > > > I can't wait to get my hands on one of those little
                > projectors!
                > > > > >
                > > > > > I share your concern with the ubiquity of advertising, but
                > > > > >
                > > > > > "The camera is the new gun."
                > > > > >
                > > > > > Is a HUGE statement!
                > > > > >
                > > > > > I think it is. One camera can take down a government.
                > > > > >
                > > > > > Cheers,
                > > > > >
                > > > > > Ron Watson
                > > > > > http://k9disc.blip.tv
                > > > > > http://k9disc.com
                > > > > > http://discdogradio.com
                > > > > > http://pawsitivevybe.com
                > > > > >
                > > > > >
                > > > > >
                > > > > > On Mar 30, 2008, at 7:29 PM, Mike Meiser wrote:
                > > > > >
                > > > > > > One of my favorite things about pixelodeon was not the set
                > > > > > > screening room
                > > > > > > sessions but the widespread use of 17 macbooks for impromptu
                > > > > > > screening of
                > > > > > > all manner of videos over beers, at party's or simply
                > > > > gatherings in
                > > > > > > hotel
                > > > > > > rooms.
                > > > > > >
                > > > > > > It's these shared interactive viewing experiences that
                > really make
                > > > > > > video
                > > > > > > come full circle as a part of real world face to face
                > > > > conversations.
                > > > > > >
                > > > > > > If the following nytimes article is correct pocket-able
                > projection
                > > > > > > units are
                > > > > > > expected to hit the market by years end at $300-350. This
                > could in
                > > > > > > 2009
                > > > > > > usher in a whole new possibility for impromptu video
                > screenings.
                > > > > > >
                > > > > > > http://www.nytimes.com/2008/03/30/business/30novelties.html
                > > > > > >
                > > > > > > I'd be curious to know if anyone has gotten their hands on
                > any
                > > > > early
                > > > > > > prototypes yet.
                > > > > > >
                > > > > > > Perhaps there is some potential for sponsorship here at
                > future
                > > > > video
                > > > > > > blogging events.
                > > > > > >
                > > > > > > Of course, cheap portable projectors could have far more
                > > > > > > ramifications then
                > > > > > > simple video blog screenings.
                > > > > > >
                > > > > > > I cannot begin to imagine how useful these things might
                > become in
                > > > > > > the next 5
                > > > > > > years.
                > > > > > >
                > > > > > > As they get cheaper they could one day become as common in
                > laptops
                > > > > > > as video
                > > > > > > cams are now, and they have some interesting ramifications
                > as
                > > > > > > secondary
                > > > > > > information displays for "ambient" information such as
                > twitter,
                > > > > > > friend feed,
                > > > > > > Digg Spy, news, weather, and things we have yet to dream up.
                > > > > > >
                > > > > > > If they become ubiquitous enough they could further blur the
                > > > > spacial
                > > > > > > boundaries between office chair and arm chair, or put in
                > other
                > > > > > > terms between
                > > > > > > computer screen and tv.
                > > > > > >
                > > > > > > As an information architect I find this prospect of a more
                > > > > ubiquitous
                > > > > > > physical information space fascinating.
                > > > > > >
                > > > > > > Anyone who has ever been on a trading room floor at an
                > exchange
                > > > > > > will know
                > > > > > > what I'm talking about by ubiquitous information space.
                > > > > > >
                > > > > > > Or for that matter anyone who's watched a scifi movie
                > where whole
                > > > > > > walls are
                > > > > > > information displays.
                > > > > > >
                > > > > > > Geography / real world space is the new frontier of
                > > > > cyberspace / media
                > > > > > > space. We've brought meat space to cyberspace, now we're
                > > > > increasingly
                > > > > > > bringing cyberspace back to meat space.
                > > > > > >
                > > > > > > This has tremendous implications for memory, productivity,
                > and
                > > > > > > privacy.
                > > > > > >
                > > > > > > If the medium is the message, such bringing of video to
                > meat space
                > > > > > > means
                > > > > > > that today's trends such as the personal and non-linear
                > nature of
                > > > > > > videos
                > > > > > > will be nothing in comparison o the non-linearity and
                > personal
                > > > > > > nature media
                > > > > > > created for this eventual future. Video made to be projected
                > > > > > > ubiquitously
                > > > > > > into the real world will have to be more non-linear, and
                > in order
                > > > > > > to grab
                > > > > > > our attention be more personal then ever. The narrative
                > will be
                > > > > ever
                > > > > > > increasingly abstracted and exploded. TV shows like south
                > park,
                > > > > the
                > > > > > > simpsons and so called "reality tv" that are increasingly
                > > > > dependant on
                > > > > > > direct references to larger narratives in culture rather
                > then
                > > > > their
                > > > > > > own sub
                > > > > > > plots will look as quaint as Leave it to Beaver in coming
                > years.
                > > > > > > This goes
                > > > > > > for MTV's non-linear programing as well.
                > > > > > >
                > > > > > > It also means our notions of information overload today will
                > > > > quaint in
                > > > > > > comparison to those of tomorrow.
                > > > > > >
                > > > > > > Case in point these cheap tiny projectors are not just
                > consumer
                > > > > > > technology.
                > > > > > > They may be used to assault our senses in yet new ways.
                > They are
                > > > > > > perfect
                > > > > > > for projecting advertising in all manner of unpredictable
                > > > > spaces...
                > > > > > > subways,
                > > > > > > public bathrooms, elevators and more since they will be much
                > > > > > > cheaper, easier
                > > > > > > to install, and easier to secure then today's ad display
                > systems.
                > > > > > >
                > > > > > > Of course a simple piece of gum will become a great weapon
                > for
                > > > > > > future ad
                > > > > > > busters. :)
                > > > > > >
                > > > > > > I'm reminded of Jan of Faux Press's ideas of
                > "vlogvertising".
                > > > > > >
                > > > > > > We artists mine as well be the first to explore and exploit
                > > > > this newly
                > > > > > > opening media space.
                > > > > > >
                > > > > > > My dream of widespread true traditional gallery spaces for
                > video
                > > > > > > blogging
                > > > > > > will increasingly become possible, even probable.
                > > > > > >
                > > > > > > Of course my 1984 type prediction is projected media will
                > one day
                > > > > > > be as
                > > > > > > ubiquitous at assaulting our senses as video cam's are
                > already
                > > > > > > becoming at
                > > > > > > recording our every action.
                > > > > > >
                > > > > > > My answer to that is we as citizens must preserve our
                > right to
                > > > > give
                > > > > > > as well
                > > > > > > as we get in this future. Such is the important front line
                > of the
                > > > > > > battle
                > > > > > > with public photography and graffiti. The right to arm
                > oneself
                > > > > with
                > > > > > > a camera
                > > > > > > should be as protected as the right to free speech, or even
                > > > > more so
                > > > > > > then our
                > > > > > > right to Carry a gun. The camera is the new gun.
                > > > > > >
                > > > > > > I'm continually reminded of William Burrough's
                > "Apocalypse". Art
                > > > > > > leaps from
                > > > > > > its frames.
                > > > > > >
                > > > > > > A whole new frontier is starting to open for media space.
                > > > > > >
                > > > > > > And you thought all the real innovation had already
                > happened.
                > > > > > >
                > > > > > > P.S. Don't even get me started on on 3D holographic
                > projection. ;)
                > > > > > >
                > > > > > > -Mike
                > > > > > > mmeiser.com/blog
                > > > > > >
                > > > > > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                > > > > > >
                > > > > > >
                > > > > > >
                > > > > >
                > > > > >
                > > > > >
                > > > > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                > > > > >
                > > > > >
                > > > > > ------------------------------------
                > > > > >
                > > > > > Yahoo! Groups Links
                > > > > >
                > > > > >
                > > > > >
                > > > > >
                > > > >
                > > > > --
                > > > > The Faux Press - by whatever media necessary
                > > > > http://feeds.feedburner.com/diaryofafauxjournalist - RSS
                > > > > http://fauxpress.blogspot.com
                > > > > aim=janofsound
                > > > > air=862.571.5334
                > > > > skype=janmclaughlin
                > > > >
                > > > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                > > > >
                > > > >
                > > > >
                > > >
                > > >
                > > >
                > > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                > > >
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > > ------------------------------------
                > >
                > > Yahoo! Groups Links
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > >
                >
                > --
                > The Faux Press - by whatever media necessary
                > http://feeds.feedburner.com/diaryofafauxjournalist - RSS
                > http://fauxpress.blogspot.com
                > aim=janofsound
                > air=862.571.5334
                > skype=janmclaughlin
                >
                > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                >
                >
                >



                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • Tony
                Since I know most digital camcorders can see infrared just fine I m building an IR illumination device to use with my Xacti. It ll do pretty much the same
                Message 7 of 11 , Apr 6, 2008
                • 0 Attachment
                  Since I know most digital camcorders can see infrared just fine I'm
                  building an IR illumination device to use with my Xacti. It'll do
                  pretty much the same function.

                  I'm taking photos and some video of the build. I'll probably put it up
                  on Instructables when I'm done.


                  --- In videoblogging@yahoogroups.com, Tim Street <tim@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > Here's one to add to The Camera is the new gun list:
                  >
                  > http://tinyurl.com/6r9xwm
                  >
                  > Men with 'highly sensitive' cameras arrested at airport
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > Tim Street
                  > Creator/Executive Producer
                  > French Maid TV
                  > Subscribe for FREE @
                  > http://frenchmaidtv.com/itunes
                  > My Demo Reels &Blog
                  > http://1timstreet.com
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > On Apr 2, 2008, at 9:50 AM, Jan McLaughlin wrote:
                  >
                  > > Since we've gotten political, wanted to bring the newest Lawrence
                  > > Lessig
                  > > project to the fore.
                  > >
                  > > Lessig, the same fellow who brought you the Creative Commons.
                  > >
                  > > Yeah.
                  > >
                  > > This new project is http://change-congress.org :
                  > >
                  > > This non-partisan movement invites members of Congress to agree to:
                  > >
                  > > 1) Support public financing of elections
                  > > 2) Support banning earmarks
                  > > 3) Swear off taking money from Lobbyiests and PAC's
                  > > 4) Support transparency
                  > >
                  > > If the legislator agrees, Change-Congress will have a digital army
                  > > ready -
                  > > pledged - to send $X.00 campaign dollars their way.
                  > >
                  > > Don't agree? No money.
                  > >
                  > > http://change-congress.org/about/
                  > >
                  > > Carrots, baby.
                  > >
                  > > Money talks.
                  > >
                  > > Jan
                  > >
                  > > On Mon, Mar 31, 2008 at 3:32 PM, Steve Watkins <steve@...>
                  > > wrote:
                  > >
                  > > > Well yes the trend towards laws that crackdown on this sort of stuff
                  > > > is alarming, and does not bode well.
                  > > >
                  > > > Frankly I expected even worse by now, recalling that in the first
                  > > few
                  > > > years after 9/11, there were stories about how seemingly innocent
                  > > > video of tourist attractions was actually fiendish terrorist
                  > > planning
                  > > > videos. So the London police camera posters fill me with despair but
                  > > > the satirical treatment of them gives me some small hope.
                  > > >
                  > > > Even without a war on terror moron error, Im not someone who feels
                  > > too
                  > > > comfortable waving a camera round in public, as I know some humans
                  > > > feel it is invasive.
                  > > >
                  > > > I dont know about the USA but in Britain the internet is commonly
                  > > > mentioned on TV news & debate shows in a negative light,
                  > > paedophiles &
                  > > > terrorists, so I just roll my eyes when I see similar tactics in the
                  > > > newspapers too.
                  > > >
                  > > > Anyway you know I have speculated in the past as to what future our
                  > > > governments may be planning for, although its also possible that
                  > > there
                  > > > are more basic motives at work. The police usually want as much
                  > > power
                  > > > as they can get, more laws to be on their side, new weapons and
                  > > > evidence gathering devices. Some corporations make the technology
                  > > that
                  > > > suits this paranoid surveillance game, so theres the basic profit
                  > > > motive & potential to corrupt government there.
                  > > >
                  > > > As for this not arguing anymore, in order for that to work you
                  > > > possibly shouldnt mention most of the points argued about, or
                  > > goading
                  > > > those that 'defend the corporate agenda' to respond. Where does my
                  > > > position fit into that narrow representation? Because you hopefully
                  > > > know that I believe government imposed restrictions that affect
                  > > > vlogging are already here in some countries, and remain a real
                  > > > possibility at any time in the future. Restriction of such things is
                  > > > one of the first things governments tend to do when they feel under
                  > > > threat, and even in tines of relative security, its the sort of
                  > > right
                  > > > that ebbs away unless continually fought for. But this would
                  > > happen in
                  > > > a counry without corporations too. And you know I scoff at the idea
                  > > > that corporations have an agenda to crush independent media. Mostly
                  > > > because they dont need to. Corporations strengths over small
                  > > business,
                  > > > indies, individuals, is part of their design, business as usual
                  > > > assures their dominance, they dont need to take extra measures to
                  > > > crush. Now over the course of a generation the whole game could
                  > > change
                  > > > because of the internet, but its by no means a cert, and its
                  > > entirely
                  > > > possible they could dominate the net without taking any special
                  > > > measures or doing any deliberate crushing.
                  > > >
                  > > > I mean really, I am hardly a fan of corporations, I read lots of
                  > > stuff
                  > > > about bad things they do, just as i know small business and
                  > > government
                  > > > also cause bad, as do individuals. Due to their scale, governments
                  > > and
                  > > > corporations can do the harm on a far larger scale, and we have
                  > > > greater expectations about what good they should be doing instead.
                  > > And
                  > > > yeah, humans appear to be too hypocritical and corrupt to save the
                  > > > world. Some think that if we can only harness the sorts of thinking
                  > > > that can happen in war, but in the struggle against climate change
                  > > and
                  > > > resource depletion in a time of peace, we might stand a chance. I
                  > > fear
                  > > > that it will be harnessed through actual war.
                  > > >
                  > > > Can anybody imagine the global internet existing as we know it if
                  > > > there ws a non-nuclear war on the scale of world war 2 in future?
                  > > And
                  > > > that would also be an end the the complexities of debates about free
                  > > > speech, rights to photograph, gossip, whistleblow & be a real
                  > > > journalist or citizen? 'Theres a war on' will be the justification
                  > > for
                  > > > everything, and the grumbling will have to be more low-key than we
                  > > > have become used to. Now as much as the war on terror effect has
                  > > been
                  > > > used to bring in lots of legislation, and fight a few regionalized
                  > > > wars, and although it did cause a lot of critical debate to fall
                  > > > silent for several years in the USA, it has not had the huge impact
                  > > > that a real world war would actually have on all these issues. So
                  > > > whats my message here, 'this is as good as it gets?', 'you aint seen
                  > > > nothing yet?'. Hope not.
                  > > >
                  > > > Cheers
                  > > >
                  > > > Steve Elbows
                  > > >
                  > > > --- In videoblogging@yahoogroups.com, Ron Watson <k9disc@> wrote:
                  > > >
                  > > > > What a strange new world, eh?
                  > > > >
                  > > > > So interesting...
                  > > > >
                  > > > > These laws are yet another affront to a citizen's media.
                  > > > >
                  > > > > I've no desire to bring up another 'Net-Neutrality' and 'Crushing
                  > > > > independent content producers' argument, in fact I'm done with
                  > > > > argument, so I'll just say what I want to say and shut my mouth.
                  > > > >
                  > > > > I find the removal of cameras and criminalization of camera use in
                  > > > > public spaces to be very interesting, and it seems to me that
                  > > this is
                  > > > > the State 'Crushing' the independent content creators. I wonder if
                  > > > > this will bring the defenders of the Corporate agenda, and their
                  > > lack
                  > > > > of desire to crush independent content creators to the discussion.
                  > > > >
                  > > > > In an era of 'It's the Economy Stupid', a Cheap Labor Economy, and
                  > > > > feeding people to the Economy, I see no difference between the
                  > > > > authoritarian control by the State and need to feed a Corporate
                  > > Grow
                  > > > > or Die agenda. It's the same thing. They are entirely dependent
                  > > upon
                  > > > > eachother.
                  > > > >
                  > > > > See, I am attacking the government for the same damn thing. I am,
                  > > > > however, not attacking the idea of government, just as I was not
                  > > > > attacking the idea of economy. Both are absolute perversions of
                  > > their
                  > > > > foundational concepts. They are extremely unhealthy, BOTH of them.
                  > > > > We've got to fix them - BOTH.
                  > > > >
                  > > > > They are becoming one and the same, and I wish I could be more
                  > > > > persuasive because, like Global Warming, the environment,
                  > > perpetual
                  > > > > war and the destruction of Democracy, once it's readily apparent,
                  > > > > it's too friggin' late.
                  > > > >
                  > > > > It's so naked, how can people not see it.
                  > > > >
                  > > > > blech...
                  > > > >
                  > > > > Ron
                  > > > >
                  > > > >
                  > > > >
                  > > > >
                  > > > >
                  > > > > On Mar 31, 2008, at 5:44 AM, Jan McLaughlin wrote:
                  > > > >
                  > > > > > Yeah, Ron, I concur: great post.
                  > > > > >
                  > > > > > Well, well, well...
                  > > > > >
                  > > > > > Cameras = guns.
                  > > > > >
                  > > > > > Based upon states' recent leaps to control 'em, you are onto
                  > > > > > something,
                  > > > > > particularly if these hand-held projectors will be battery-
                  > > powered.
                  > > > > >
                  > > > > > As you might imagine, find this product extremely exciting news.
                  > > > > >
                  > > > > > Already, images are being projected on sidewalks, floors, walls.
                  > > > > > Mostly
                  > > > > > logos, single words. Slideshows. Graphical.
                  > > > > >
                  > > > > > Narrative structure / storytelling will be affected because
                  > > people are
                  > > > > > deeply resistant to having their audio-space cluttered. Net-
                  > > net: these
                  > > > > > projected motion pictures will inevitably have to work as silent
                  > > > > > films.
                  > > > > >
                  > > > > > There's both rub and irony that in this beginning of the high
                  > > tech
                  > > > > > age, we
                  > > > > > return to the silent film.
                  > > > > >
                  > > > > > Perhaps advertisers will have Bluetooth-available audio?
                  > > Perhaps if
                  > > > > > the
                  > > > > > motion pictures are delivered via the web, one might stream the
                  > > > > > audio over
                  > > > > > one's cell phone. The challenge would be to sync the sound.
                  > > > > >
                  > > > > > I'm on fire with possibility.
                  > > > > >
                  > > > > > Thanks.
                  > > > > > Jan
                  > > > > >
                  > > > > > On Mon, Mar 31, 2008 at 3:08 AM, Ron Watson <k9disc@> wrote:
                  > > > > >
                  > > > > > > Great post, Mike!
                  > > > > > >
                  > > > > > > I can't wait to get my hands on one of those little
                  > > projectors!
                  > > > > > >
                  > > > > > > I share your concern with the ubiquity of advertising, but
                  > > > > > >
                  > > > > > > "The camera is the new gun."
                  > > > > > >
                  > > > > > > Is a HUGE statement!
                  > > > > > >
                  > > > > > > I think it is. One camera can take down a government.
                  > > > > > >
                  > > > > > > Cheers,
                  > > > > > >
                  > > > > > > Ron Watson
                  > > > > > > http://k9disc.blip.tv
                  > > > > > > http://k9disc.com
                  > > > > > > http://discdogradio.com
                  > > > > > > http://pawsitivevybe.com
                  > > > > > >
                  > > > > > >
                  > > > > > >
                  > > > > > > On Mar 30, 2008, at 7:29 PM, Mike Meiser wrote:
                  > > > > > >
                  > > > > > > > One of my favorite things about pixelodeon was not the set
                  > > > > > > > screening room
                  > > > > > > > sessions but the widespread use of 17 macbooks for impromptu
                  > > > > > > > screening of
                  > > > > > > > all manner of videos over beers, at party's or simply
                  > > > > > gatherings in
                  > > > > > > > hotel
                  > > > > > > > rooms.
                  > > > > > > >
                  > > > > > > > It's these shared interactive viewing experiences that
                  > > really make
                  > > > > > > > video
                  > > > > > > > come full circle as a part of real world face to face
                  > > > > > conversations.
                  > > > > > > >
                  > > > > > > > If the following nytimes article is correct pocket-able
                  > > projection
                  > > > > > > > units are
                  > > > > > > > expected to hit the market by years end at $300-350. This
                  > > could in
                  > > > > > > > 2009
                  > > > > > > > usher in a whole new possibility for impromptu video
                  > > screenings.
                  > > > > > > >
                  > > > > > > > http://www.nytimes.com/2008/03/30/business/30novelties.html
                  > > > > > > >
                  > > > > > > > I'd be curious to know if anyone has gotten their hands on
                  > > any
                  > > > > > early
                  > > > > > > > prototypes yet.
                  > > > > > > >
                  > > > > > > > Perhaps there is some potential for sponsorship here at
                  > > future
                  > > > > > video
                  > > > > > > > blogging events.
                  > > > > > > >
                  > > > > > > > Of course, cheap portable projectors could have far more
                  > > > > > > > ramifications then
                  > > > > > > > simple video blog screenings.
                  > > > > > > >
                  > > > > > > > I cannot begin to imagine how useful these things might
                  > > become in
                  > > > > > > > the next 5
                  > > > > > > > years.
                  > > > > > > >
                  > > > > > > > As they get cheaper they could one day become as common in
                  > > laptops
                  > > > > > > > as video
                  > > > > > > > cams are now, and they have some interesting ramifications
                  > > as
                  > > > > > > > secondary
                  > > > > > > > information displays for "ambient" information such as
                  > > twitter,
                  > > > > > > > friend feed,
                  > > > > > > > Digg Spy, news, weather, and things we have yet to dream up.
                  > > > > > > >
                  > > > > > > > If they become ubiquitous enough they could further blur the
                  > > > > > spacial
                  > > > > > > > boundaries between office chair and arm chair, or put in
                  > > other
                  > > > > > > > terms between
                  > > > > > > > computer screen and tv.
                  > > > > > > >
                  > > > > > > > As an information architect I find this prospect of a more
                  > > > > > ubiquitous
                  > > > > > > > physical information space fascinating.
                  > > > > > > >
                  > > > > > > > Anyone who has ever been on a trading room floor at an
                  > > exchange
                  > > > > > > > will know
                  > > > > > > > what I'm talking about by ubiquitous information space.
                  > > > > > > >
                  > > > > > > > Or for that matter anyone who's watched a scifi movie
                  > > where whole
                  > > > > > > > walls are
                  > > > > > > > information displays.
                  > > > > > > >
                  > > > > > > > Geography / real world space is the new frontier of
                  > > > > > cyberspace / media
                  > > > > > > > space. We've brought meat space to cyberspace, now we're
                  > > > > > increasingly
                  > > > > > > > bringing cyberspace back to meat space.
                  > > > > > > >
                  > > > > > > > This has tremendous implications for memory, productivity,
                  > > and
                  > > > > > > > privacy.
                  > > > > > > >
                  > > > > > > > If the medium is the message, such bringing of video to
                  > > meat space
                  > > > > > > > means
                  > > > > > > > that today's trends such as the personal and non-linear
                  > > nature of
                  > > > > > > > videos
                  > > > > > > > will be nothing in comparison o the non-linearity and
                  > > personal
                  > > > > > > > nature media
                  > > > > > > > created for this eventual future. Video made to be projected
                  > > > > > > > ubiquitously
                  > > > > > > > into the real world will have to be more non-linear, and
                  > > in order
                  > > > > > > > to grab
                  > > > > > > > our attention be more personal then ever. The narrative
                  > > will be
                  > > > > > ever
                  > > > > > > > increasingly abstracted and exploded. TV shows like south
                  > > park,
                  > > > > > the
                  > > > > > > > simpsons and so called "reality tv" that are increasingly
                  > > > > > dependant on
                  > > > > > > > direct references to larger narratives in culture rather
                  > > then
                  > > > > > their
                  > > > > > > > own sub
                  > > > > > > > plots will look as quaint as Leave it to Beaver in coming
                  > > years.
                  > > > > > > > This goes
                  > > > > > > > for MTV's non-linear programing as well.
                  > > > > > > >
                  > > > > > > > It also means our notions of information overload today will
                  > > > > > quaint in
                  > > > > > > > comparison to those of tomorrow.
                  > > > > > > >
                  > > > > > > > Case in point these cheap tiny projectors are not just
                  > > consumer
                  > > > > > > > technology.
                  > > > > > > > They may be used to assault our senses in yet new ways.
                  > > They are
                  > > > > > > > perfect
                  > > > > > > > for projecting advertising in all manner of unpredictable
                  > > > > > spaces...
                  > > > > > > > subways,
                  > > > > > > > public bathrooms, elevators and more since they will be much
                  > > > > > > > cheaper, easier
                  > > > > > > > to install, and easier to secure then today's ad display
                  > > systems.
                  > > > > > > >
                  > > > > > > > Of course a simple piece of gum will become a great weapon
                  > > for
                  > > > > > > > future ad
                  > > > > > > > busters. :)
                  > > > > > > >
                  > > > > > > > I'm reminded of Jan of Faux Press's ideas of
                  > > "vlogvertising".
                  > > > > > > >
                  > > > > > > > We artists mine as well be the first to explore and exploit
                  > > > > > this newly
                  > > > > > > > opening media space.
                  > > > > > > >
                  > > > > > > > My dream of widespread true traditional gallery spaces for
                  > > video
                  > > > > > > > blogging
                  > > > > > > > will increasingly become possible, even probable.
                  > > > > > > >
                  > > > > > > > Of course my 1984 type prediction is projected media will
                  > > one day
                  > > > > > > > be as
                  > > > > > > > ubiquitous at assaulting our senses as video cam's are
                  > > already
                  > > > > > > > becoming at
                  > > > > > > > recording our every action.
                  > > > > > > >
                  > > > > > > > My answer to that is we as citizens must preserve our
                  > > right to
                  > > > > > give
                  > > > > > > > as well
                  > > > > > > > as we get in this future. Such is the important front line
                  > > of the
                  > > > > > > > battle
                  > > > > > > > with public photography and graffiti. The right to arm
                  > > oneself
                  > > > > > with
                  > > > > > > > a camera
                  > > > > > > > should be as protected as the right to free speech, or even
                  > > > > > more so
                  > > > > > > > then our
                  > > > > > > > right to Carry a gun. The camera is the new gun.
                  > > > > > > >
                  > > > > > > > I'm continually reminded of William Burrough's
                  > > "Apocalypse". Art
                  > > > > > > > leaps from
                  > > > > > > > its frames.
                  > > > > > > >
                  > > > > > > > A whole new frontier is starting to open for media space.
                  > > > > > > >
                  > > > > > > > And you thought all the real innovation had already
                  > > happened.
                  > > > > > > >
                  > > > > > > > P.S. Don't even get me started on on 3D holographic
                  > > projection. ;)
                  > > > > > > >
                  > > > > > > > -Mike
                  > > > > > > > mmeiser.com/blog
                  > > > > > > >
                  > > > > > > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  > > > > > > >
                  > > > > > > >
                  > > > > > > >
                  > > > > > >
                  > > > > > >
                  > > > > > >
                  > > > > > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  > > > > > >
                  > > > > > >
                  > > > > > > ------------------------------------
                  > > > > > >
                  > > > > > > Yahoo! Groups Links
                  > > > > > >
                  > > > > > >
                  > > > > > >
                  > > > > > >
                  > > > > >
                  > > > > > --
                  > > > > > The Faux Press - by whatever media necessary
                  > > > > > http://feeds.feedburner.com/diaryofafauxjournalist - RSS
                  > > > > > http://fauxpress.blogspot.com
                  > > > > > aim=janofsound
                  > > > > > air=862.571.5334
                  > > > > > skype=janmclaughlin
                  > > > > >
                  > > > > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  > > > > >
                  > > > > >
                  > > > > >
                  > > > >
                  > > > >
                  > > > >
                  > > > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  > > > >
                  > > >
                  > > >
                  > > >
                  > > > ------------------------------------
                  > > >
                  > > > Yahoo! Groups Links
                  > > >
                  > > >
                  > > >
                  > > >
                  > >
                  > > --
                  > > The Faux Press - by whatever media necessary
                  > > http://feeds.feedburner.com/diaryofafauxjournalist - RSS
                  > > http://fauxpress.blogspot.com
                  > > aim=janofsound
                  > > air=862.571.5334
                  > > skype=janmclaughlin
                  > >
                  > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  >
                • Richard Amirault
                  ... From: Tony ... Rather than build one ... check out the Sony HVL-IRM .. I have one .. it works fine. $40 from BH Photo
                  Message 8 of 11 , Apr 7, 2008
                  • 0 Attachment
                    ----- Original Message -----
                    From: "Tony"


                    > Since I know most digital camcorders can see infrared just fine I'm
                    > building an IR illumination device to use with my Xacti. It'll do
                    > pretty much the same function.
                    >
                    > I'm taking photos and some video of the build. I'll probably put it up
                    > on Instructables when I'm done.

                    Rather than build one ... check out the Sony HVL-IRM .. I have one .. it
                    works fine. $40 from BH Photo
                    http://www.bhphotovideo.com/bnh/controller/home?shs=HVL-IRM&ci=0&sb=ps&pn=1&sq=desc&InitialSearch=yes&O=catalog.jsp&A=search&Q=*&bhs=t

                    Richard Amirault
                    Boston, MA, USA
                    http://n1jdu.org
                    http://bostonfandom.org
                    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J7hf9u2ZdlQ
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