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Re: [videoblogging] My disclosure/roles dilemma

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  • Lisa Williams
    Right on! Transparency is the key. You re not misrepresenting yourself to anybody, so I think it s cool. One of the things I hope widespread blogging will do
    Message 1 of 19 , Mar 1, 2005
      Right on!

      Transparency is the key. You're not misrepresenting yourself to
      anybody, so I think it's cool.

      One of the things I hope widespread blogging will do (and audioblogging
      and videoblogging) will be to make it more possible to be a human being
      at work.

      After I left my old job I started blogging under my own name. I realize
      now that if I go get a new job, I can't work for anybody who objects to
      having people who are actual human beings with thoughts and opinions,
      particularly opinions and thoughts that are visible via Google.

      That's totally ok with me, though. I think we should start with
      nonessential personel like me and work our way up to the cancer-curing
      and space-shuttle flying types. Till we can all be free.

      Lisa

      As far as the "not saying" bit goes, my personal maxim is "I don't share
      what I don't own." I don't blog about my marriage much, because I
      don't have sole ownership of those stories. Similarly, if I was
      working, I'd consider those stories to be jointly owned by me and my
      coworkers and my employer. If I was going to share those things, I'd
      want to make sure it was kosher with everybody before I shared them.
      (Off topic: But I don't think anybody should be fired for expressing
      their own stories or ideas on the net. That's lame).


      Deirdre Straughan wrote:

      > You may recall that I "came out" to this group in January as a
      > corporate rep for TVBLOB (at present, a little-known Italian startup,
      > but just you wait! <grin>). I originally joined this group last June
      > to explore the concept of videoblogging - I figured these folks would
      > be some of the early adopters of our technology.
      >
      > But my way of exploring things is to DO them, and, particularly in
      > this case, I never thought that I would just try it and then go away
      > again. So I'm as much a "real" videoblogger as anybody, and at the
      > same time I'm learning things for my company. I don't see a conflict
      > here. I get to do something fun that I love, and in a sense I even get
      > paid for it. I'm very lucky.
      >
      > I have been living/working on the boundary between private and
      > professional for most of my professional life. My former job involved
      > representing my company in various online forums, for years. I have a
      > finicky code of personal ethics, and I never consciously lied to
      > anyone about anything the company was doing. I sometimes had to NOT
      > say things - there are situations where, no matter how honest you
      > want to be, you are bound by law and business ethics to protect trade
      > secrets, adhere to non-disclosure agreements, etc. I do advise you to
      > be very, very careful and, when you're not sure, talk to someone in
      > the company about it; don't get yourself or your company in trouble by
      > shooting off your mouth.
      >
      > In spite of popular "wisdom" to the contrary, is IS possible to be
      > ethical in business, to treat customers like human beings whose
      > opinions matter, to say what you do and do what you say - and make it
      > pay. This is new and scary territory to a lot of companies, but the
      > smart ones are catching on. The new trend towards open corporate
      > blogging is encouraging - companies are finally getting on the
      > Cluetrain. In this environment, you don't have to compromise between
      > business and ethics. Be your own ethical self and customers will love
      > you for it. The company may balk sometimes, but it's your job to
      > explain to them why the customer is in fact always right (almost) and
      > they need to listen. You're the conduit between compan and customer.
      > It can be an uncomfortable role, but it's also a critically important
      > one and, thank god, its importance is increasingly recognized these
      > days. You're just the right kind of person to do this job, and you'll
      > do just fine.
      >
      > FWIW, the career section of my personal site has quite a bit of
      > material on what I did, and how, and how people reacted. You might
      > find some of it helpful, or at least funny.
      >
      >
      > best regards,
      > Deirdré Straughan
      >
      > http://straughan.com (personal)
      >
      > http://tvblob.com/ (company)
      >
      >
      > On Tue, 1 Mar 2005 01:15:18 +0100, R. Kristiansen
      > <raymondmk@...> wrote:
      > >
      > > Dear videobloggers,
      > >
      > > I have seriously been feeling quite strange the last days. Today it
      > > became official that I have started working for a company that makes
      > > blogging software (www.blogsoft.net). It is a small Norwegian upstart,
      > > but we have a few important clients already and we are expanding. I am
      > > videoblogging responsible, and ever since I was offered this job - and
      > > I accepted - I have been having this nagging tickle in my mind. It is
      > > driving me crazy sometimes.
      > >
      > > Yes, I have been working for companies before, as well as NGOs and
      > > political parties. Yet I have never had a conflict of personal
      > > interests like now, and I would just like to ask about your thoughts
      > > on this.
      > >
      > > How can I continue making videoblogs without being seen as simply
      > > doing cheap PR for my company? How can I mention my "day job" without
      > > feeling dirty? Is it just something wrong with me, or is this a
      > > general problem for people who suddenly find themselves working for
      > > The Evil Capitalists?
      > >
      > > I want to continue to videoblog, to be able to be silly, and make a
      > > vlog while drunk, or having another bad hair day, or when I complain
      > > about some political issue or whatever. This is, obviously, a very new
      > > situation for me, and I seriously have no idea how to handle it.
      > >
      > > I want to stay true to myself, while not compromising my employers. I
      > > want to be able to hold several roles and mix them but not mix them so
      > > much that it becomes ugly and cheap.
      > >
      > > Any thoughts on this?
      > >
      > > best regards,
      > >
      > > Raymond M. Kristiansen
      > > - can I still just be a videoblogger?
      > >
      > >
      > > Yahoo! Groups Links
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      >
      >
      > --
      > best regards,
      > Deirdré Straughan
      > www.straughan.com
      >
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      --
      Lisa Williams
      lisa@...
      Lisa's weblog: http://www.cadence90.com/wp/
    • Deirdre Straughan
      I started my newsletter about two weeks after quitting my last job (July, 2001), and was amazed at the sense of freedom. My corporate newsletters were never
      Message 2 of 19 , Mar 2, 2005
        I started my newsletter about two weeks after quitting my last job
        (July, 2001), and was amazed at the sense of freedom. My corporate
        newsletters were never very corporate in tone - in fact, I think
        that's why they were so successful - but I still had to always be very
        conscious about what I was saying. The constraint I felt most was that
        I couldn't express opinions, for fear of stepping on someone's toes.
        In my own newsletters, I can talk about whatever I want to, and I give
        lots of opinions, though I always consider the feelings of anyone
        mentioned in them who might read them (including, of course, my
        family). It's been very liberating, and I can't see going entirely
        back in the bottle now.




        On Tue, 01 Mar 2005 14:05:53 -0500, Lisa Williams <lisa@...> wrote:
        >
        > As far as the "not saying" bit goes, my personal maxim is "I don't share
        > what I don't own." I don't blog about my marriage much, because I
        > don't have sole ownership of those stories. Similarly, if I was
        > working, I'd consider those stories to be jointly owned by me and my
        > coworkers and my employer. If I was going to share those things, I'd
        > want to make sure it was kosher with everybody before I shared them.
        > (Off topic: But I don't think anybody should be fired for expressing
        > their own stories or ideas on the net. That's lame).
        --
        best regards,
        Deirdré Straughan
        www.straughan.com
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