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Privacy and the Aggregator

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  • sull
    Quick question to all. Any thoughts on privacy within media aggregators? In other words, is anyone concerned about sharing *everything* that you subscribe
    Message 1 of 5 , Oct 31, 2006
      Quick question to all.

      Any thoughts on privacy within media aggregators?
      In other words, is anyone concerned about sharing *everything* that you
      subscribe to?
      Sure, we like to share our "watchlists" in this open space.
      But what if you are using RSS for private purposes.... business, pleasure
      etc.
      Does the insecure and communicative environment of a media aggregator
      matter?

      I'm just interested in getting a pulse on this for a possible blog article i
      have in queue to write.

      BOO!

      --
      Sull
      http://vlogdir.com (a project)
      http://SpreadTheMedia.org (my blog)
      http://interdigitate.com (otherly)


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Nick Schmidt
      Personally.. I haven t found a good on yet. Probably the best is itunes. However, you can t look are read only blogs which sucks. I m going to start using
      Message 2 of 5 , Oct 31, 2006
        Personally.. I haven't found a good on yet. Probably the best is
        itunes. However, you can't look are read only blogs which sucks. I'm
        going to start using Google reader for read only blogs.

        I tired fireant for PC.. just didn't work well and was difficult to
        understand.However I think a lot of Mac users like it..

        my 2 cents

        nick

        --- In videoblogging@yahoogroups.com, sull <sulleleven@...> wrote:
        >
        > Quick question to all.
        >
        > Any thoughts on privacy within media aggregators?
        > In other words, is anyone concerned about sharing *everything*
        that you
        > subscribe to?
        > Sure, we like to share our "watchlists" in this open space.
        > But what if you are using RSS for private purposes.... business,
        pleasure
        > etc.
        > Does the insecure and communicative environment of a media aggregator
        > matter?
        >
        > I'm just interested in getting a pulse on this for a possible blog
        article i
        > have in queue to write.
        >
        > BOO!
        >
        > --
        > Sull
        > http://vlogdir.com (a project)
        > http://SpreadTheMedia.org (my blog)
        > http://interdigitate.com (otherly)
        >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
      • groups-yahoo-com@mmeiser.com
        Sull, You re always right on the edgy topics. I think there s an new axpectation in the web 2.0 space... there are widespread experiments, such as wikipedia...
        Message 3 of 5 , Nov 1, 2006
          Sull,

          You're always right on the edgy topics.

          I think there's an new axpectation in the web 2.0 space... there are
          widespread experiments, such as wikipedia... where the default
          expectation is complete disclosure... unless otherwise stated.

          Basically I like this appoach. In social media it means we start with
          the assumption that everything is a public performance... as if you
          were acting, talking chatting in the town square.

          We then ask, what don't you want public.

          In my opinion this is the sort of thinking that was revolutionary
          about most of what's going on now.

          it's a slackware concept.

          What's the least I can do.

          The creators of the wiki asked, what's the least amount of structure
          we need to provide for people to collaborate.

          Security experts develop on a less is more principal.

          By starting with the boundries low we can clearly see what fails, what
          privacy's have been breached.

          The only alternative is to start out aiming for a VERY costly and time
          consuming Fort Nox of privacy.... at which case you finally get
          done... and it gives a false sense of security and still has very
          costly security holes.

          It's the same way with developing software... you ask not what do I
          want, but what's the least I need to complish my objective.

          In short, we cannot always anticipate privacy needs.

          As for me... I just assume EVERY website I use is a privacy concern
          and give only that information which is absolutely essential.

          The operative idea being... you can ALWAYS choose to be anonymous...
          at least right up to the point where you give your credit card... but
          we're talking about social media... not ecommerce.

          Ecommerce is a different story.

          We are now reverting back to a more natural public and communal
          communications world.

          my 2 cens :)

          -Mike
          mefeedia.com
          mmeiser.com/blog

          On 10/31/06, Nick Schmidt <cunas4@...> wrote:
          > Personally.. I haven't found a good on yet. Probably the best is
          > itunes. However, you can't look are read only blogs which sucks. I'm
          > going to start using Google reader for read only blogs.
          >
          > I tired fireant for PC.. just didn't work well and was difficult to
          > understand.However I think a lot of Mac users like it..
          >
          > my 2 cents
          >
          > nick
          >
          > --- In videoblogging@yahoogroups.com, sull <sulleleven@...> wrote:
          > >
          > > Quick question to all.
          > >
          > > Any thoughts on privacy within media aggregators?
          > > In other words, is anyone concerned about sharing *everything*
          > that you
          > > subscribe to?
          > > Sure, we like to share our "watchlists" in this open space.
          > > But what if you are using RSS for private purposes.... business,
          > pleasure
          > > etc.
          > > Does the insecure and communicative environment of a media aggregator
          > > matter?
          > >
          > > I'm just interested in getting a pulse on this for a possible blog
          > article i
          > > have in queue to write.
          > >
          > > BOO!
          > >
          > > --
          > > Sull
          > > http://vlogdir.com (a project)
          > > http://SpreadTheMedia.org (my blog)
          > > http://interdigitate.com (otherly)
          > >
          > >
          > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          > >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > Yahoo! Groups Links
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
        • sull
          Hey Mike. I know it s automatic to think social content when we talk about RSS. Obviously i am all about that. I guess the privacy issues are solved by
          Message 4 of 5 , Nov 1, 2006
            Hey Mike.

            I know it's automatic to think "social content" when we talk about RSS.
            Obviously i am all about that.

            I guess the privacy issues are solved by products/services that cater to
            closed media distributed via RSS (business confidentials or personal
            communications) if/when email or other direct content transactions are not
            used.

            But my curiosity falls between the two. And it is just curiosity. I am not
            suggesting this is a large concern.
            The thing is, there is a difference to sharing content with other people and
            sharing content with service providers.
            Even if those service providers seem trustworthy today.

            In the case of aggregators.... I can almost see a similarity to the concerns
            people have with adware and call-home background processes of software that
            send specifics of what we are doing with the app and what content we are
            consuming and outputting etc.

            When I first learned that fireant (windows) collects every feed you manually
            enter/subscribe to from the desktop app, i was not thrilled.
            I found this out when i added a feed generated from a prototype site that I
            didnt nec want revealed. The feed ended up in the public fireant
            directory. josh removed it quick enough for me. but it made me think about
            this behind the scenes stuff. their was no way to avoid it either. maybe a
            newer version has a toggle?
            the mac version lets you disable usage stats, but i am not sure that is the
            same thing as sharing every feed i enter with them.

            for all i know, democracy and any other aggregator does this too. and yeah,
            99.9999% of the time it wouldnt matter. But their are a gazillion feeds out
            there.... and RSS is not only used to share social media. And maybe some
            people just want to consume and not share. maybe they are more sensitive to
            exposing viewing taste and habits. What if John Politician used an
            aggregator and added a porn channel (by mistake or intentional) and that got
            leaked?

            Just food for thought. And I know that privacy doesnt actually exist since
            you can get all granular with the topic.

            Sull


            On 11/1/06, groups-yahoo-com@... <groups-yahoo-com@...>
            wrote:
            >
            > Sull,
            >
            > You're always right on the edgy topics.
            >
            > I think there's an new axpectation in the web 2.0 space... there are
            > widespread experiments, such as wikipedia... where the default
            > expectation is complete disclosure... unless otherwise stated.
            >
            > Basically I like this appoach. In social media it means we start with
            > the assumption that everything is a public performance... as if you
            > were acting, talking chatting in the town square.
            >
            > We then ask, what don't you want public.
            >
            > In my opinion this is the sort of thinking that was revolutionary
            > about most of what's going on now.
            >
            > it's a slackware concept.
            >
            > What's the least I can do.
            >
            > The creators of the wiki asked, what's the least amount of structure
            > we need to provide for people to collaborate.
            >
            > Security experts develop on a less is more principal.
            >
            > By starting with the boundries low we can clearly see what fails, what
            > privacy's have been breached.
            >
            > The only alternative is to start out aiming for a VERY costly and time
            > consuming Fort Nox of privacy.... at which case you finally get
            > done... and it gives a false sense of security and still has very
            > costly security holes.
            >
            > It's the same way with developing software... you ask not what do I
            > want, but what's the least I need to complish my objective.
            >
            > In short, we cannot always anticipate privacy needs.
            >
            > As for me... I just assume EVERY website I use is a privacy concern
            > and give only that information which is absolutely essential.
            >
            > The operative idea being... you can ALWAYS choose to be anonymous...
            > at least right up to the point where you give your credit card... but
            > we're talking about social media... not ecommerce.
            >
            > Ecommerce is a different story.
            >
            > We are now reverting back to a more natural public and communal
            > communications world.
            >
            > my 2 cens :)
            >
            > -Mike
            > mefeedia.com
            > mmeiser.com/blog
            >
            >
            > On 10/31/06, Nick Schmidt <cunas4@... <cunas4%40hotmail.com>>
            > wrote:
            > > Personally.. I haven't found a good on yet. Probably the best is
            > > itunes. However, you can't look are read only blogs which sucks. I'm
            > > going to start using Google reader for read only blogs.
            > >
            > > I tired fireant for PC.. just didn't work well and was difficult to
            > > understand.However I think a lot of Mac users like it..
            > >
            > > my 2 cents
            > >
            > > nick
            > >
            > > --- In videoblogging@yahoogroups.com <videoblogging%40yahoogroups.com>,
            > sull <sulleleven@...> wrote:
            > > >
            > > > Quick question to all.
            > > >
            > > > Any thoughts on privacy within media aggregators?
            > > > In other words, is anyone concerned about sharing *everything*
            > > that you
            > > > subscribe to?
            > > > Sure, we like to share our "watchlists" in this open space.
            > > > But what if you are using RSS for private purposes.... business,
            > > pleasure
            > > > etc.
            > > > Does the insecure and communicative environment of a media aggregator
            > > > matter?
            > > >
            > > > I'm just interested in getting a pulse on this for a possible blog
            > > article i
            > > > have in queue to write.
            > > >
            > > > BOO!
            > > >
            > > > --
            > > > Sull
            > > > http://vlogdir.com (a project)
            > > > http://SpreadTheMedia.org (my blog)
            > > > http://interdigitate.com (otherly)
            > > >
            > > >
            > > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            > > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > > Yahoo! Groups Links
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            >
            >
            >



            --
            Sull
            http://vlogdir.com (a project)
            http://SpreadTheMedia.org (my blog)
            http://interdigitate.com (otherly)


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Markus Sandy
            a little OT, but I love that word mike. Did you typo or make it up? it sounds very web 2 point oh oh you should probably register it ;) makes me think of
            Message 5 of 5 , Nov 1, 2006
              a little OT, but I love that word mike.

              Did you typo or make it up?

              it sounds very web 2 point oh oh

              you should probably register it ;)

              makes me think of expectation, but now with Ajax!

              seems like it's catching on too

              http://google.com?q=axpectation

              regards,
              markus



              On Nov 1, 2006, at 6:46 AM, groups-yahoo-com@... wrote:

              >
              > I think there's an new axpectation in the web 2.0 space... there are
              > widespread experiments, such as wikipedia... where the default
              > expectation is complete disclosure... unless otherwise stated.
              >
              >


              ---
              Markus Sandy
              http://feeds.feedburner.com/havemoneywillvlog
              http://feeds.feedburner.com/apperceptions
              http://feeds.feedburner.com/digitaldojo
              http://feeds.feedburner.com/spinflow


              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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