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"The Henningers" : [veterans] This article is from "Defending America" and I thought everyone would like to see it.

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  • Johnhawk`Cato Murray
    This country needs to wake-up and make a note: 450,00 Viet Nam Veterans now suffering and less than 40% drawing anything from VA so they can live satisfied
    Message 1 of 1 , Jun 3, 2000
      This country needs to wake-up and make a note:
      450,00 Viet Nam Veterans now suffering and less than 40%
      drawing anything from VA so they can live satisfied with the Dews Paid
      over there. You never see those 4 letters *PTSD*,
      We still smell the gunsmoke and blood, I guess 'U' don't. Oyeh
      my MOS was MI too.

      [Two things function when open//mind and parachute]
      'Este-cat`e omis-oh`hlikis-ketv' <low creek>
      Sarge Johnhawk ~The Peace-Maker~
      P________S
      Gave 12 yrs of life and SFC E-7 toArmy in May 1970 ! ! !
      --------------------------------------------------------
      --------- Begin forwarded message ----------
      From: "The Henningers" <henninger1@...>
      To: <veterans@...>
      Subject: [veterans] This article is from "Defending America" and I
      thought everyone would like to see it.
      Date: Thu, 4 May 2000 18:46:59 -0400
      Message-ID: <004e01bfb61a$a9383020$389810cf@monnahen>

      ARTICLE 6
      ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
      "And So We Remember Vietnam (Cong Hoa) "
      ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
      Ed.: 25 years after the end of the Vietnam War, few veterans remain on
      active duty. Here are the thoughts of a still serving senior
      Non-Commissioned Officer
      ***********************************************************************
      By Master Sergeant Jeffrey D. Gallant
      525 M.I. Group, APO, SF, 96222
      Republic of Vietnam, 24 April 1969 - 01 July 1971.

      On 30 April 1975, the events, people and places that were my, and many
      others experience in Vietnam, were relegated to a past that, in terms of
      the
      final outcome, never existed. It was all for nothing.

      In terms of those we knew, the friends and relatives we lost or left
      there,
      in terms of those who have since, and will again be asked to finish what
      we
      were not allowed to, this is the final tragedy of Vietnam.

      A small country, with those people who we thought were worth saving, is
      gone! A nation died, alone, with only a small bang, and a whimper that
      haunts some of us still, more than can be entwined in my words on this
      page.

      A nation died, and was mourned by too few, but how and why it happened is
      at
      "ground zero" on the stage of shame and the cause of anguish, among us
      who
      served, really cared, and tried to save this small country.

      Each person has his or her own opinion as to why the end came as it did.
      Some people say that it was underestimation of the North Vietnamese,
      overestimation of the South Vietnamese, or a little of both. Some still
      say
      that it really was just a civil war, won by heroic freedom-loving rebels.
      Some decry the political restraint placed on the American military force,
      that they believe could have won, if allowed to make its own battlefield
      decisions. Some blame that same military force directly.

      An easy answer is the media's grand pronouncement of the popular
      disenchantment and lack of will on the part of America to see this war
      through. Some citizens of this nation still rejoice at the outcome,
      victory
      for their friends. Some simply do not care. Some want to forget that it
      ever happened. We must never allow them to do that!

      But whatever you believe, those of us who fought in the swamps, hills,
      jungles, escarpments, caves, and also in the skies of Southeast Asia,
      with
      death dancing around us, did so in the finest tradition of the American
      Fighting Man.

      There was little personal glory in my Vietnam War, and we all knew it,
      with
      what was going on back home. While I was on leave after my first full
      tour, exactly thirty years ago today, my hometown, Framingham,
      Massachusetts, dedicated a flagpole in the town square to Vietnam
      Veterans.
      Counting me, there were eleven people in attendance on a beautiful spring
      morning.

      I remember being disbelieving of the fact that I was still alive after
      waking up on a damp morning, in the highlands, within view of the border
      of
      Laos. I was stunned with my apparent immortality, at the age of
      nineteen.
      In a thankless effort we carried the war to the enemy and continually
      tried
      to pull together the indigenous Southern forces to stand up and fight.

      With the passing of time, missions accomplished, and the cost of those
      missions recorded in friends lost and left behind, we plodded onward for
      our
      country, shedding our adolescence and our innocence bit by bit. Yet
      despite
      these things, despite vilification from our own countrymen, despite
      comic-opera restraints that decreed that the war could be fought only on
      the
      enemy's terms, despite defenses unmatched in the history of war in the
      air
      and on the ground, we flew and fought. And we almost pulled it off.

      The world will never know, nor does it want to hear, how we had victory
      in
      our grasp, only to have it traded away in one final concession by those
      to
      whom the politically expedient is the best way. Only we know, and we
      will
      keep that knowledge with us to our final breaths. Our courage, loyalty,
      professionalism, and patriotism are a matter of record, and are never to
      be
      questioned by anyone!

      And as the call has come, and will again, from the Book of Isaiah, "Whom
      shall I send, and who will go for us?" those who follow the highest quest
      will answer as they always have. "Here am I; send me," said the author
      and
      so said many other fine young men, as they went off to war, most boys,
      but
      to become men of freedom


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



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