Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Daal Chawal: Indian lentils and rice are the answer to a vegan’s prayer

Expand Messages
  • swpgh01.t21@btinternet.com
    Vegans are the brave and ethical souls of today s society. Veganism is a lifestyle choice that excludes the use of animals or animal products for food,
    Message 1 of 6 , Nov 7, 2009
    • 0 Attachment
      Vegans are the brave and ethical souls of today's society. Veganism is a lifestyle choice that excludes the use of animals or animal products for food, clothing or any other purpose. It is truly a daring endeavor considering the meal choices presented in American society today. The meal choices presented to a vegan conjure up images of bland, uninteresting and often unpalatable food.

      That changes completely when you bring India into the equation. For centuries, many Indians have sustained themselves and thrived on a diet that does not involve the use of animals nor animal products.

      We all know that the human body requires protein for sustenance and growth. Animal protein such as meat, dairy, fish and eggs contains all the necessary amino acids to constitute a complete protein. Plant groups contain different essential amino acids and need to be combined with other food groups to be rendered a complete protein.

      The most popular such combination the world over for a complete protein is legumes and grains. Lentils and rice is the solution and is perhaps the most widely consumed meal combination the world over. In India – it's called Daal Chawal: Daal being the Hindi term for lentils and chawal being the term for rice. For our vegan, a helping of chawal and a spoonful of delicioius daal is all you need to get the strength and nourishment you need.

      The easiest to prepare and most commonly found daal preparation we know is Daal Tadka. This dish is made exclusively with split lentils such as Masoor daal (split red lentils), Yellow daal or Moong daal (split moong beans), Chana daal (split chick peas) or Toor daal (split pigeon peas – the most popular in India). Split lentils, unlike its whole counterparts, cook down quickly and easily and reduce to a homogenous pulp. Its texture varies from that of a thick porridge to a runny soup, depending on the likes and dislikes of the cook.

      Tadka is the Hindi word for tempering. The rich flavor is achieved by tempering oil (or ghee if you choose the non vegan route) with spices and flavoring. Adding the aromatics to hot oil causes the volatile oils in them to explode thus imparting its flavor to the dish. The tadka when introduced to boiled lentils adds the wealth of flavor and taste that is sought after.

      The following recipe for Daal Tadka calls for Yellow daal (split moong daal) and is easily available at your local Indian store. The step-by-step instructional video will guide you through the process of making Daal Tadka:

      Daal:

      1 cup yellow split lentils
      ½ tsp ginger paste
      salt to taste

      Tadka:

      2 tbsp Ghee or oil
      ½ tsp brown mustard seeds
      ½ tsp cumin seeds
      3 – 4 flakes garlic pounded and roughly chopped
      3 – 4 dried red chilies
      5 -6 curry leaves
      ¼ tsp turmeric powder
      a pinch of asafetida (hing)
      1 cup chopped tomatoes
      1 lime (juiced – optional)
      ¼ cup chopped cilantro (for garnish)

      Wash the lentils thoroughly and strain. In a pot, combine with 4 cups of cold water and bring to a boil. A film of foam will start to form on the surface after 5 - 7 minutes of boiling. It's perfectly normal and should be skimmed off and discarded. Season the boiling daal with salt and add a half tsp of ginger paste. Simmer till lentils are cooked and take on the appearance of a pulp like porridge.

      In a separate sauté pan on medium heat, add the ghee or the oil. When the ghee/oil is hot and shimmers on the surface, add in the mustard and cumin seeds. The seeds will start crackling as the seeds start to perfume the oil.

      Add the chilies, the garlic and curry leaves and sauté for a minute. Add the turmeric powder and the pinch of asafetida and stir quickly for approximately 30 seconds.

      Add the tomatoes and cook for a few minutes till the tomatoes break down into a pulp like mass. Your tadka (tempering) is now ready.

      Add the tadka to the pot of simmering lentils. Stir and cover for a few minutes to allow the flavors and aromas of the tempering permeate the lentils. If you like citrus flavors in your daal, you may squeeze in the juice of half a lime as per your taste. This is purely optional but it does give the daal a very fresh and tangy flavor.

      Serve over Basmati rice, garnished with a sprinkling of chopped cilantro leaves.

      Happy eating!!!
    • Marcy Greenhut
      The idea of needing complete protein at one sitting has been disproven many times over the last few decades.  This is a myth.  I gave up combining protein
      Message 2 of 6 , Nov 11, 2009
      • 0 Attachment
        The idea of needing "complete protein" at one sitting has been disproven many times over the last few decades.  This is a myth.  I gave up combining protein years ago, and I've been vegan for 12 years.

        Aside from that issue, I thought this was a vegan list, and the recipe for daal includes ghee. 

        Marcy



        ________________________________
        From: "swpgh01.t21@..." <swpgh01.t21@...>
        To: veganview@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Sat, November 7, 2009 12:26:21 PM
        Subject: [veganview] Daal Chawal: Indian lentils and rice are the answer to a vegan’s prayer

         
        Vegans are the brave and ethical souls of today's society. Veganism is a lifestyle choice that excludes the use of animals or animal products for food, clothing or any other purpose. It is truly a daring endeavor considering the meal choices presented in American society today. The meal choices presented to a vegan conjure up images of bland, uninteresting and often unpalatable food.

        That changes completely when you bring India into the equation. For centuries, many Indians have sustained themselves and thrived on a diet that does not involve the use of animals nor animal products.

        We all know that the human body requires protein for sustenance and growth. Animal protein such as meat, dairy, fish and eggs contains all the necessary amino acids to constitute a complete protein. Plant groups contain different essential amino acids and need to be combined with other food groups to be rendered a complete protein.

        The most popular such combination the world over for a complete protein is legumes and grains. Lentils and rice is the solution and is perhaps the most widely consumed meal combination the world over. In India – it's called Daal Chawal: Daal being the Hindi term for lentils and chawal being the term for rice. For our vegan, a helping of chawal and a spoonful of delicioius daal is all you need to get the strength and nourishment you need.

        The easiest to prepare and most commonly found daal preparation we know is Daal Tadka. This dish is made exclusively with split lentils such as Masoor daal (split red lentils), Yellow daal or Moong daal (split moong beans), Chana daal (split chick peas) or Toor daal (split pigeon peas – the most popular in India). Split lentils, unlike its whole counterparts, cook down quickly and easily and reduce to a homogenous pulp. Its texture varies from that of a thick porridge to a runny soup, depending on the likes and dislikes of the cook.

        Tadka is the Hindi word for tempering. The rich flavor is achieved by tempering oil (or ghee if you choose the non vegan route) with spices and flavoring. Adding the aromatics to hot oil causes the volatile oils in them to explode thus imparting its flavor to the dish. The tadka when introduced to boiled lentils adds the wealth of flavor and taste that is sought after.

        The following recipe for Daal Tadka calls for Yellow daal (split moong daal) and is easily available at your local Indian store. The step-by-step instructional video will guide you through the process of making Daal Tadka:

        Daal:

        1 cup yellow split lentils
        ½ tsp ginger paste
        salt to taste

        Tadka:

        2 tbsp Ghee or oil
        ½ tsp brown mustard seeds
        ½ tsp cumin seeds
        3 – 4 flakes garlic pounded and roughly chopped
        3 – 4 dried red chilies
        5 -6 curry leaves
        ¼ tsp turmeric powder
        a pinch of asafetida (hing)
        1 cup chopped tomatoes
        1 lime (juiced – optional)
        ¼ cup chopped cilantro (for garnish)

        Wash the lentils thoroughly and strain. In a pot, combine with 4 cups of cold water and bring to a boil. A film of foam will start to form on the surface after 5 - 7 minutes of boiling. It's perfectly normal and should be skimmed off and discarded. Season the boiling daal with salt and add a half tsp of ginger paste. Simmer till lentils are cooked and take on the appearance of a pulp like porridge.

        In a separate sauté pan on medium heat, add the ghee or the oil. When the ghee/oil is hot and shimmers on the surface, add in the mustard and cumin seeds. The seeds will start crackling as the seeds start to perfume the oil.

        Add the chilies, the garlic and curry leaves and sauté for a minute. Add the turmeric powder and the pinch of asafetida and stir quickly for approximately 30 seconds.

        Add the tomatoes and cook for a few minutes till the tomatoes break down into a pulp like mass. Your tadka (tempering) is now ready.

        Add the tadka to the pot of simmering lentils. Stir and cover for a few minutes to allow the flavors and aromas of the tempering permeate the lentils. If you like citrus flavors in your daal, you may squeeze in the juice of half a lime as per your taste. This is purely optional but it does give the daal a very fresh and tangy flavor.

        Serve over Basmati rice, garnished with a sprinkling of chopped cilantro leaves.

        Happy eating!!!




        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • tofuschmofu
        I d not be too hard on that recipe, it does say ghee or oil. Also; most of the ghee sold in the Indian markets I ve been to here in New York aren t really
        Message 3 of 6 , Nov 13, 2009
        • 0 Attachment
          I'd not be too hard on that recipe, it does say ghee or oil. Also; most of the "ghee" sold in the Indian markets I've been to here in New York aren't really ghee, but instead are imitation flavored oil.

          --- In veganview@yahoogroups.com, Marcy Greenhut <imgreen07@...> wrote:
          >
          > The idea of needing "complete protein" at one sitting has been disproven many times over the last few decades.  This is a myth.  I gave up combining protein years ago, and I've been vegan for 12 years.
          >
          > Aside from that issue, I thought this was a vegan list, and the recipe for daal includes ghee. 
          >
          > Marcy
          >
          >
          >
          > ________________________________
          > From: "swpgh01.t21@..." <swpgh01.t21@...>
          > To: veganview@yahoogroups.com
          > Sent: Sat, November 7, 2009 12:26:21 PM
          > Subject: [veganview] Daal Chawal: Indian lentils and rice are the answer to a vegan’s prayer
          >
          >  
          > Vegans are the brave and ethical souls of today's society. Veganism is a lifestyle choice that excludes the use of animals or animal products for food, clothing or any other purpose. It is truly a daring endeavor considering the meal choices presented in American society today. The meal choices presented to a vegan conjure up images of bland, uninteresting and often unpalatable food.
          >
          > That changes completely when you bring India into the equation. For centuries, many Indians have sustained themselves and thrived on a diet that does not involve the use of animals nor animal products.
          >
          > We all know that the human body requires protein for sustenance and growth. Animal protein such as meat, dairy, fish and eggs contains all the necessary amino acids to constitute a complete protein. Plant groups contain different essential amino acids and need to be combined with other food groups to be rendered a complete protein.
          >
          > The most popular such combination the world over for a complete protein is legumes and grains. Lentils and rice is the solution and is perhaps the most widely consumed meal combination the world over. In India – it's called Daal Chawal: Daal being the Hindi term for lentils and chawal being the term for rice. For our vegan, a helping of chawal and a spoonful of delicioius daal is all you need to get the strength and nourishment you need.
          >
          > The easiest to prepare and most commonly found daal preparation we know is Daal Tadka. This dish is made exclusively with split lentils such as Masoor daal (split red lentils), Yellow daal or Moong daal (split moong beans), Chana daal (split chick peas) or Toor daal (split pigeon peas – the most popular in India). Split lentils, unlike its whole counterparts, cook down quickly and easily and reduce to a homogenous pulp. Its texture varies from that of a thick porridge to a runny soup, depending on the likes and dislikes of the cook.
          >
          > Tadka is the Hindi word for tempering. The rich flavor is achieved by tempering oil (or ghee if you choose the non vegan route) with spices and flavoring. Adding the aromatics to hot oil causes the volatile oils in them to explode thus imparting its flavor to the dish. The tadka when introduced to boiled lentils adds the wealth of flavor and taste that is sought after.
          >
          > The following recipe for Daal Tadka calls for Yellow daal (split moong daal) and is easily available at your local Indian store. The step-by-step instructional video will guide you through the process of making Daal Tadka:
          >
          > Daal:
          >
          > 1 cup yellow split lentils
          > ½ tsp ginger paste
          > salt to taste
          >
          > Tadka:
          >
          > 2 tbsp Ghee or oil
          > ½ tsp brown mustard seeds
          > ½ tsp cumin seeds
          > 3 – 4 flakes garlic pounded and roughly chopped
          > 3 – 4 dried red chilies
          > 5 -6 curry leaves
          > ¼ tsp turmeric powder
          > a pinch of asafetida (hing)
          > 1 cup chopped tomatoes
          > 1 lime (juiced – optional)
          > ¼ cup chopped cilantro (for garnish)
          >
          > Wash the lentils thoroughly and strain. In a pot, combine with 4 cups of cold water and bring to a boil. A film of foam will start to form on the surface after 5 - 7 minutes of boiling. It's perfectly normal and should be skimmed off and discarded. Season the boiling daal with salt and add a half tsp of ginger paste. Simmer till lentils are cooked and take on the appearance of a pulp like porridge.
          >
          > In a separate sauté pan on medium heat, add the ghee or the oil. When the ghee/oil is hot and shimmers on the surface, add in the mustard and cumin seeds. The seeds will start crackling as the seeds start to perfume the oil.
          >
          > Add the chilies, the garlic and curry leaves and sauté for a minute. Add the turmeric powder and the pinch of asafetida and stir quickly for approximately 30 seconds.
          >
          > Add the tomatoes and cook for a few minutes till the tomatoes break down into a pulp like mass. Your tadka (tempering) is now ready.
          >
          > Add the tadka to the pot of simmering lentils. Stir and cover for a few minutes to allow the flavors and aromas of the tempering permeate the lentils. If you like citrus flavors in your daal, you may squeeze in the juice of half a lime as per your taste. This is purely optional but it does give the daal a very fresh and tangy flavor.
          >
          > Serve over Basmati rice, garnished with a sprinkling of chopped cilantro leaves.
          >
          > Happy eating!!!
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
        • Peter VV
          Hi Marcy, It does state ghee or oil so it appeals to every one! I do like dhaal.   Peter vv ________________________________ From: Marcy Greenhut
          Message 4 of 6 , Nov 14, 2009
          • 0 Attachment
            Hi Marcy,
            It does state ghee or oil so it appeals to every one!
            I do like dhaal.

             
            Peter vv




            ________________________________
            From: Marcy Greenhut <imgreen07@...>
            To: veganview@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Wednesday, 11 November, 2009 18:10:02
            Subject: Re: [veganview] Daal Chawal: Indian lentils and rice are the answer to a vegan’s prayer

             
            The idea of needing "complete protein" at one sitting has been disproven many times over the last few decades.  This is a myth.  I gave up combining protein years ago, and I've been vegan for 12 years.

            Aside from that issue, I thought this was a vegan list, and the recipe for daal includes ghee. 

            Marcy

            ____________ _________ _________ __
            From: "swpgh01.t21@ btinternet. com" <swpgh01.t21@ btinternet. com>
            To: veganview@yahoogrou ps.com
            Sent: Sat, November 7, 2009 12:26:21 PM
            Subject: [veganview] Daal Chawal: Indian lentils and rice are the answer to a vegan’s prayer

             
            Vegans are the brave and ethical souls of today's society. Veganism is a lifestyle choice that excludes the use of animals or animal products for food, clothing or any other purpose. It is truly a daring endeavor considering the meal choices presented in American society today. The meal choices presented to a vegan conjure up images of bland, uninteresting and often unpalatable food.

            That changes completely when you bring India into the equation. For centuries, many Indians have sustained themselves and thrived on a diet that does not involve the use of animals nor animal products.

            We all know that the human body requires protein for sustenance and growth. Animal protein such as meat, dairy, fish and eggs contains all the necessary amino acids to constitute a complete protein. Plant groups contain different essential amino acids and need to be combined with other food groups to be rendered a complete protein.

            The most popular such combination the world over for a complete protein is legumes and grains. Lentils and rice is the solution and is perhaps the most widely consumed meal combination the world over. In India – it's called Daal Chawal: Daal being the Hindi term for lentils and chawal being the term for rice. For our vegan, a helping of chawal and a spoonful of delicioius daal is all you need to get the strength and nourishment you need.

            The easiest to prepare and most commonly found daal preparation we know is Daal Tadka. This dish is made exclusively with split lentils such as Masoor daal (split red lentils), Yellow daal or Moong daal (split moong beans), Chana daal (split chick peas) or Toor daal (split pigeon peas – the most popular in India). Split lentils, unlike its whole counterparts, cook down quickly and easily and reduce to a homogenous pulp. Its texture varies from that of a thick porridge to a runny soup, depending on the likes and dislikes of the cook.

            Tadka is the Hindi word for tempering. The rich flavor is achieved by tempering oil (or ghee if you choose the non vegan route) with spices and flavoring. Adding the aromatics to hot oil causes the volatile oils in them to explode thus imparting its flavor to the dish. The tadka when introduced to boiled lentils adds the wealth of flavor and taste that is sought after.

            The following recipe for Daal Tadka calls for Yellow daal (split moong daal) and is easily available at your local Indian store. The step-by-step instructional video will guide you through the process of making Daal Tadka:

            Daal:

            1 cup yellow split lentils
            ½ tsp ginger paste
            salt to taste

            Tadka:

            2 tbsp Ghee or oil
            ½ tsp brown mustard seeds
            ½ tsp cumin seeds
            3 – 4 flakes garlic pounded and roughly chopped
            3 – 4 dried red chilies
            5 -6 curry leaves
            ¼ tsp turmeric powder
            a pinch of asafetida (hing)
            1 cup chopped tomatoes
            1 lime (juiced – optional)
            ¼ cup chopped cilantro (for garnish)

            Wash the lentils thoroughly and strain. In a pot, combine with 4 cups of cold water and bring to a boil. A film of foam will start to form on the surface after 5 - 7 minutes of boiling. It's perfectly normal and should be skimmed off and discarded. Season the boiling daal with salt and add a half tsp of ginger paste. Simmer till lentils are cooked and take on the appearance of a pulp like porridge.

            In a separate sauté pan on medium heat, add the ghee or the oil. When the ghee/oil is hot and shimmers on the surface, add in the mustard and cumin seeds. The seeds will start crackling as the seeds start to perfume the oil.

            Add the chilies, the garlic and curry leaves and sauté for a minute. Add the turmeric powder and the pinch of asafetida and stir quickly for approximately 30 seconds.

            Add the tomatoes and cook for a few minutes till the tomatoes break down into a pulp like mass. Your tadka (tempering) is now ready.

            Add the tadka to the pot of simmering lentils. Stir and cover for a few minutes to allow the flavors and aromas of the tempering permeate the lentils. If you like citrus flavors in your daal, you may squeeze in the juice of half a lime as per your taste. This is purely optional but it does give the daal a very fresh and tangy flavor.

            Serve over Basmati rice, garnished with a sprinkling of chopped cilantro leaves.

            Happy eating!!!

            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]







            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Marcy Greenhut
            So far, no one s addressed my main point about combining proteins.  The recipe comment wasn t the main point of my message.  And I still don t see why, if
            Message 5 of 6 , Nov 16, 2009
            • 0 Attachment
              So far, no one's addressed my main point about combining proteins. 

              The recipe comment wasn't the main point of my message.  And I still don't see why, if ghee can be interchanged with oil, anyone sending a receipe to this list wouldn't eliminate the mention of ghee entirely.  Nice to know Indian shops sell oil as ghee, but reliance on ghee is still prevalent at Indian restaurants and difficult to avoid without unrelenting vigilance.

              Marcy




              ________________________________
              From: tofuschmofu <brivarib5@...>
              To: veganview@yahoogroups.com
              Sent: Fri, November 13, 2009 11:18:20 AM
              Subject: [veganview] Re: Daal Chawal: Indian lentils and rice are the answer to a vegan’s prayer

               
              I'd not be too hard on that recipe, it does say ghee or oil. Also; most of the "ghee" sold in the Indian markets I've been to here in New York aren't really ghee, but instead are imitation flavored oil.

              --- In veganview@yahoogrou ps.com, Marcy Greenhut <imgreen07@. ..> wrote:
              >
              > The idea of needing "complete protein" at one sitting has been disproven many times over the last few decades.  This is a myth.  I gave up combining protein years ago, and I've been vegan for 12 years.
              >
              > Aside from that issue, I thought this was a vegan list, and the recipe for daal includes ghee. 
              >
              > Marcy
              >
              >
              >
              > ____________ _________ _________ __
              > From: "swpgh01.t21@ ..." <swpgh01.t21@ ...>
              > To: veganview@yahoogrou ps.com
              > Sent: Sat, November 7, 2009 12:26:21 PM
              > Subject: [veganview] Daal Chawal: Indian lentils and rice are the answer to a vegan’s prayer
              >
              >  
              > Vegans are the brave and ethical souls of today's society. Veganism is a lifestyle choice that excludes the use of animals or animal products for food, clothing or any other purpose. It is truly a daring endeavor considering the meal choices presented in American society today. The meal choices presented to a vegan conjure up images of bland, uninteresting and often unpalatable food.
              >
              > That changes completely when you bring India into the equation. For centuries, many Indians have sustained themselves and thrived on a diet that does not involve the use of animals nor animal products.
              >
              > We all know that the human body requires protein for sustenance and growth. Animal protein such as meat, dairy, fish and eggs contains all the necessary amino acids to constitute a complete protein. Plant groups contain different essential amino acids and need to be combined with other food groups to be rendered a complete protein.
              >
              > The most popular such combination the world over for a complete protein is legumes and grains. Lentils and rice is the solution and is perhaps the most widely consumed meal combination the world over. In India – it's called Daal Chawal: Daal being the Hindi term for lentils and chawal being the term for rice. For our vegan, a helping of chawal and a spoonful of delicioius daal is all you need to get the strength and nourishment you need.
              >
              > The easiest to prepare and most commonly found daal preparation we know is Daal Tadka. This dish is made exclusively with split lentils such as Masoor daal (split red lentils), Yellow daal or Moong daal (split moong beans), Chana daal (split chick peas) or Toor daal (split pigeon peas – the most popular in India). Split lentils, unlike its whole counterparts, cook down quickly and easily and reduce to a homogenous pulp. Its texture varies from that of a thick porridge to a runny soup, depending on the likes and dislikes of the cook.
              >
              > Tadka is the Hindi word for tempering. The rich flavor is achieved by tempering oil (or ghee if you choose the non vegan route) with spices and flavoring. Adding the aromatics to hot oil causes the volatile oils in them to explode thus imparting its flavor to the dish. The tadka when introduced to boiled lentils adds the wealth of flavor and taste that is sought after.
              >
              > The following recipe for Daal Tadka calls for Yellow daal (split moong daal) and is easily available at your local Indian store. The step-by-step instructional video will guide you through the process of making Daal Tadka:
              >
              > Daal:
              >
              > 1 cup yellow split lentils
              > ½ tsp ginger paste
              > salt to taste
              >
              > Tadka:
              >
              > 2 tbsp Ghee or oil
              > ½ tsp brown mustard seeds
              > ½ tsp cumin seeds
              > 3 – 4 flakes garlic pounded and roughly chopped
              > 3 – 4 dried red chilies
              > 5 -6 curry leaves
              > ¼ tsp turmeric powder
              > a pinch of asafetida (hing)
              > 1 cup chopped tomatoes
              > 1 lime (juiced – optional)
              > ¼ cup chopped cilantro (for garnish)
              >
              > Wash the lentils thoroughly and strain. In a pot, combine with 4 cups of cold water and bring to a boil. A film of foam will start to form on the surface after 5 - 7 minutes of boiling. It's perfectly normal and should be skimmed off and discarded. Season the boiling daal with salt and add a half tsp of ginger paste. Simmer till lentils are cooked and take on the appearance of a pulp like porridge.
              >
              > In a separate sauté pan on medium heat, add the ghee or the oil. When the ghee/oil is hot and shimmers on the surface, add in the mustard and cumin seeds. The seeds will start crackling as the seeds start to perfume the oil.
              >
              > Add the chilies, the garlic and curry leaves and sauté for a minute. Add the turmeric powder and the pinch of asafetida and stir quickly for approximately 30 seconds.
              >
              > Add the tomatoes and cook for a few minutes till the tomatoes break down into a pulp like mass. Your tadka (tempering) is now ready.
              >
              > Add the tadka to the pot of simmering lentils. Stir and cover for a few minutes to allow the flavors and aromas of the tempering permeate the lentils. If you like citrus flavors in your daal, you may squeeze in the juice of half a lime as per your taste. This is purely optional but it does give the daal a very fresh and tangy flavor.
              >
              > Serve over Basmati rice, garnished with a sprinkling of chopped cilantro leaves.
              >
              > Happy eating!!!
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              >




              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Peter VV
              There was a time when ghee used everywhere was just that i.e.  clarified butter, but over the last couple of years most takeaways and a lot of eat in
              Message 6 of 6 , Nov 17, 2009
              • 0 Attachment
                There was a time when ghee used everywhere was just that i.e.  clarified butter, but over the last couple of years most takeaways and a lot of eat in restaurants use vegetable ghee ( or vegetable oil ) so it isnt too hard to eat Indian food. Takes 2 minutes to ask what they use in cooking.
                As for combining protiens, I have been a vegan for 15 years , and a vegie for 5 before that, and I never conciously combine anything....
                 
                Peter vv




                ________________________________
                From: Marcy Greenhut <imgreen07@...>
                To: veganview@yahoogroups.com
                Sent: Monday, 16 November, 2009 17:03:57
                Subject: Re: [veganview] Re: Daal Chawal: Indian lentils and rice are the answer to a vegan’s prayer

                 
                So far, no one's addressed my main point about combining proteins. 

                The recipe comment wasn't the main point of my message.  And I still don't see why, if ghee can be interchanged with oil, anyone sending a receipe to this list wouldn't eliminate the mention of ghee entirely.  Nice to know Indian shops sell oil as ghee, but reliance on ghee is still prevalent at Indian restaurants and difficult to avoid without unrelenting vigilance.

                Marcy

                ____________ _________ _________ __
                From: tofuschmofu <brivarib5@yahoo. com>
                To: veganview@yahoogrou ps.com
                Sent: Fri, November 13, 2009 11:18:20 AM
                Subject: [veganview] Re: Daal Chawal: Indian lentils and rice are the answer to a vegan’s prayer

                 
                I'd not be too hard on that recipe, it does say ghee or oil. Also; most of the "ghee" sold in the Indian markets I've been to here in New York aren't really ghee, but instead are imitation flavored oil.

                --- In veganview@yahoogrou ps.com, Marcy Greenhut <imgreen07@. ..> wrote:
                >
                > The idea of needing "complete protein" at one sitting has been disproven many times over the last few decades.  This is a myth.  I gave up combining protein years ago, and I've been vegan for 12 years.
                >
                > Aside from that issue, I thought this was a vegan list, and the recipe for daal includes ghee. 
                >
                > Marcy
                >
                >
                >
                > ____________ _________ _________ __
                > From: "swpgh01.t21@ ..." <swpgh01.t21@ ...>
                > To: veganview@yahoogrou ps.com
                > Sent: Sat, November 7, 2009 12:26:21 PM
                > Subject: [veganview] Daal Chawal: Indian lentils and rice are the answer to a vegan’s prayer
                >
                >  
                > Vegans are the brave and ethical souls of today's society. Veganism is a lifestyle choice that excludes the use of animals or animal products for food, clothing or any other purpose. It is truly a daring endeavor considering the meal choices presented in American society today. The meal choices presented to a vegan conjure up images of bland, uninteresting and often unpalatable food.
                >
                > That changes completely when you bring India into the equation. For centuries, many Indians have sustained themselves and thrived on a diet that does not involve the use of animals nor animal products.
                >
                > We all know that the human body requires protein for sustenance and growth. Animal protein such as meat, dairy, fish and eggs contains all the necessary amino acids to constitute a complete protein. Plant groups contain different essential amino acids and need to be combined with other food groups to be rendered a complete protein.
                >
                > The most popular such combination the world over for a complete protein is legumes and grains. Lentils and rice is the solution and is perhaps the most widely consumed meal combination the world over. In India – it's called Daal Chawal: Daal being the Hindi term for lentils and chawal being the term for rice. For our vegan, a helping of chawal and a spoonful of delicioius daal is all you need to get the strength and nourishment you need.
                >
                > The easiest to prepare and most commonly found daal preparation we know is Daal Tadka. This dish is made exclusively with split lentils such as Masoor daal (split red lentils), Yellow daal or Moong daal (split moong beans), Chana daal (split chick peas) or Toor daal (split pigeon peas – the most popular in India). Split lentils, unlike its whole counterparts, cook down quickly and easily and reduce to a homogenous pulp. Its texture varies from that of a thick porridge to a runny soup, depending on the likes and dislikes of the cook.
                >
                > Tadka is the Hindi word for tempering. The rich flavor is achieved by tempering oil (or ghee if you choose the non vegan route) with spices and flavoring. Adding the aromatics to hot oil causes the volatile oils in them to explode thus imparting its flavor to the dish. The tadka when introduced to boiled lentils adds the wealth of flavor and taste that is sought after.
                >
                > The following recipe for Daal Tadka calls for Yellow daal (split moong daal) and is easily available at your local Indian store. The step-by-step instructional video will guide you through the process of making Daal Tadka:
                >
                > Daal:
                >
                > 1 cup yellow split lentils
                > ½ tsp ginger paste
                > salt to taste
                >
                > Tadka:
                >
                > 2 tbsp Ghee or oil
                > ½ tsp brown mustard seeds
                > ½ tsp cumin seeds
                > 3 – 4 flakes garlic pounded and roughly chopped
                > 3 – 4 dried red chilies
                > 5 -6 curry leaves
                > ¼ tsp turmeric powder
                > a pinch of asafetida (hing)
                > 1 cup chopped tomatoes
                > 1 lime (juiced – optional)
                > ¼ cup chopped cilantro (for garnish)
                >
                > Wash the lentils thoroughly and strain. In a pot, combine with 4 cups of cold water and bring to a boil. A film of foam will start to form on the surface after 5 - 7 minutes of boiling. It's perfectly normal and should be skimmed off and discarded. Season the boiling daal with salt and add a half tsp of ginger paste. Simmer till lentils are cooked and take on the appearance of a pulp like porridge.
                >
                > In a separate sauté pan on medium heat, add the ghee or the oil. When the ghee/oil is hot and shimmers on the surface, add in the mustard and cumin seeds. The seeds will start crackling as the seeds start to perfume the oil.
                >
                > Add the chilies, the garlic and curry leaves and sauté for a minute. Add the turmeric powder and the pinch of asafetida and stir quickly for approximately 30 seconds.
                >
                > Add the tomatoes and cook for a few minutes till the tomatoes break down into a pulp like mass. Your tadka (tempering) is now ready.
                >
                > Add the tadka to the pot of simmering lentils. Stir and cover for a few minutes to allow the flavors and aromas of the tempering permeate the lentils. If you like citrus flavors in your daal, you may squeeze in the juice of half a lime as per your taste. This is purely optional but it does give the daal a very fresh and tangy flavor.
                >
                > Serve over Basmati rice, garnished with a sprinkling of chopped cilantro leaves.
                >
                > Happy eating!!!
                >
                >
                >
                >
                > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                >

                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]







                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.