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Quick article about vit A

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  • Vegan Bodybuilding
    Here it is. Pete Ryan www.veganbodybuilding.org http://tinyurl.com/c54qqe Vegan diets are best for vitamin A May 1, 10:02 AM An article in this month’s
    Message 1 of 1 , May 2, 2009
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      Here it is.

      Pete Ryan www.veganbodybuilding.org

      http://tinyurl.com/c54qqe

      Vegan diets are best for vitamin A
      May 1, 10:02 AM

      An article in this month’s Clinical Nutrition Insight suggests that
      Americans may be getting too much vitamin A in their diets—and that it
      is best to get this nutrient from plant sources.

      Preformed vitamin A, which is called retinol, is found only in animal
      foods. However, plant foods contain carotenoids which are converted in
      the body to vitamin A. The best known and most abundant vitamin A
      precursor is beta-carotene.

      While preformed vitamin A from animal foods is toxic at high intakes,
      carotenoids are not. And too much preformed vitamin A—even at levels
      that aren’t toxic—has been linked to risk for bone fracture in some
      studies. High vitamin A intake might be especially harmful for people
      who have low intakes of vitamin D and for those who use retinol-rich
      supplemental products like cod liver oil.

      In a recent editorial on the subject, Dr John Cannell noted that “The
      body uses these carotenoid substrates to make exactly the right amount
      of retinol. It is a closed, tightly regulated system, one designed to
      perfection by Nature.” He suggested that consuming animal-derived
      vitamin A bypasses the controls of this delicate balance.

      Carotenoids, which are found in a wide variety of fruits and
      vegetables, have other health benefits in addition to their vitamin A
      activity. They have been linked to decreased cancer and heart disease
      risk and may protect vision in aging. It’s no surprise that
      vegetarians tend to have higher blood levels of carotenoids compared
      to people who eat meat. But, to get adequate vitamin A, everyone
      should consume one or two servings of beta-carotene superstars every
      day. These are sweet potatoes, carrots, spinach, kale, collards,
      cantaloupe, and dark yellow winter squash (like Hubbard and
      Butternut). Carotenoids need a little dietary fat for absorption and
      are better absorbed from foods that are lightly cooked.
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