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RE: [vacpot] Re: Home Roasting

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  • Roland
    My popcorn popper roast was usually 4-6 minutes per load, but a couple of things that are tricky are: (1) The temp of the ambient air has a direct bearing on
    Message 1 of 6 , Apr 7, 2013
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      My popcorn popper roast was usually 4-6 minutes per load, but a couple of
      things that are tricky are: (1) The temp of the ambient air has a direct
      bearing on the temp of the air in the popper. If it's cold outside, you have
      to let the popper run for several minutes to heat the internal components
      before adding the beans. (2) Unless you have (or make) some kind of device
      to rapidly air cool the beans, you really have to time it right to get the
      roast you want, since they keep roasting a while after you dump them out of
      the popper. If you are trying to get a certain level of roast to suit your
      taste, it's more difficult with the popper.



      The popper I used (vintage West Bend Poppery) did roast evenly, but the
      results were different each time I think because of the factors above. I
      ended up with some interesting batches--all of them at different roast
      levels. I'm sure if I had stuck with it I would have gotten better, but for
      me it started seeming more like work than a hobby. If I at some point
      happen to find a used automatic roaster that works well I will probably pick
      it up but I think I'm done with the manual method.



      As far as cooling beans, I've seen a couple of things people made using
      buckets with holes cut in the lid and a colander set in the hole, then they
      hook it up to a vacuum at the bottom that draws cool air rapidly through the
      beans and cools them within just a few seconds. If I was going to continue
      home roasting I would probably set up something like that, but again I
      learned that I'm not that into the home roasting idea for myself and that
      what I get at the store is fine for my taste (and ambition level).



      Roland



      From: vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com
      [mailto:vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of pawilh
      Sent: Sunday, April 7, 2013 6:28 AM
      To: vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: [vacpot] Re: Home Roasting






      I'll check them out (Sweet Marias), thanks.

      I've also watched a lot of Youtube videos up to this point--people are using
      a lot of interesting contraptions, btw--but I am also starting with a
      hot-air popper. It only handles about 1/2cup at a time, and I have to keep
      the mass spinning in the chamber by hand until first crack or so, but it's
      doing okay in terms of roasting them evenly.

      I do question whether my 4-6min roasting times are "proper" though, having
      seen professionals run their rigs for 14min plus. It could be due to the
      size of the load they're running, or just a slower roasting method, IDK.
      What I'm coming up with looks correct, but not sure how it should be
      tasting--

      I finally bought a grinder btw--actually two of them. I purchased an older
      Cory for more than I really wanted to spend, and then found a like-new
      Salton CM-4 (home burr grinder) at a local thrift shop for less than $2 the
      very next day. Both seem to work great. I also found that Krups sells a
      "pro" unit (GX610050) that looks very similar to the Hobart/Kitchenaid A9 if
      anyone is in the market.

      Thanks again for the referral.

      Paul

      --- In vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com
      <mailto:vacuumcoffeepotcollector%40yahoogroups.com> , "pawilh" <pawilh@...>
      wrote:
      >
      > I realize I may be a bit off topic with this one, but was wondering if
      anyone else here has ever home-roasted? If so, are there any good reference
      guides to taste/technique that would be helpful? I'm up to my third batch of
      a Kenyan bean I was given to try and am finding it to be a bit citrus-ey
      tasting--
      >
      > I have read that the African coffees can be like that, but I don't know
      the difference between that type of taste, and the taste of an undercooked,
      or improperly roasted bean.
      >
      > Appreciate any advice on this one, thanks!
      >
      > Paul
      >





      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • pawilh
      Roland, I m running into the same issue. They roast very fast in the popper and it s hard to maintain consistency. My first two batches were a bit bright
      Message 2 of 6 , Apr 12, 2013
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        Roland,

        I'm running into the same issue. They roast very fast in the popper and it's hard to maintain consistency. My first two batches were a bit "bright" tasting, and my latest, which I stopped before second crack, tasted overdone to me. I can see why guys are modding their poppers with rheostats and temperature control gizmos.

        I'll keep playing around--I may just go back to basics and try roasting some in a cast iron skillet. Should be able to control the temp much better, if nothing else.

        Appreciate all the info. Been very happy with my Flavor-seal/Nicro stovetop vac pot--can't beat it. The drip coffee we make at work just doesn't taste that great now!

        Paul

        --- In vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com, "Roland" <rsburritt@...> wrote:
        >
        > My popcorn popper roast was usually 4-6 minutes per load, but a couple of
        > things that are tricky are: (1) The temp of the ambient air has a direct
        > bearing on the temp of the air in the popper. If it's cold outside, you have
        > to let the popper run for several minutes to heat the internal components
        > before adding the beans. (2) Unless you have (or make) some kind of device
        > to rapidly air cool the beans, you really have to time it right to get the
        > roast you want, since they keep roasting a while after you dump them out of
        > the popper. If you are trying to get a certain level of roast to suit your
        > taste, it's more difficult with the popper.
        >
        >
        >
        > The popper I used (vintage West Bend Poppery) did roast evenly, but the
        > results were different each time I think because of the factors above. I
        > ended up with some interesting batches--all of them at different roast
        > levels. I'm sure if I had stuck with it I would have gotten better, but for
        > me it started seeming more like work than a hobby. If I at some point
        > happen to find a used automatic roaster that works well I will probably pick
        > it up but I think I'm done with the manual method.
        >
        >
        >
        > As far as cooling beans, I've seen a couple of things people made using
        > buckets with holes cut in the lid and a colander set in the hole, then they
        > hook it up to a vacuum at the bottom that draws cool air rapidly through the
        > beans and cools them within just a few seconds. If I was going to continue
        > home roasting I would probably set up something like that, but again I
        > learned that I'm not that into the home roasting idea for myself and that
        > what I get at the store is fine for my taste (and ambition level).
        >
        >
        >
        > Roland
        >
        >
        >
        > From: vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com
        > [mailto:vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of pawilh
        > Sent: Sunday, April 7, 2013 6:28 AM
        > To: vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com
        > Subject: [vacpot] Re: Home Roasting
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > I'll check them out (Sweet Marias), thanks.
        >
        > I've also watched a lot of Youtube videos up to this point--people are using
        > a lot of interesting contraptions, btw--but I am also starting with a
        > hot-air popper. It only handles about 1/2cup at a time, and I have to keep
        > the mass spinning in the chamber by hand until first crack or so, but it's
        > doing okay in terms of roasting them evenly.
        >
        > I do question whether my 4-6min roasting times are "proper" though, having
        > seen professionals run their rigs for 14min plus. It could be due to the
        > size of the load they're running, or just a slower roasting method, IDK.
        > What I'm coming up with looks correct, but not sure how it should be
        > tasting--
        >
        > I finally bought a grinder btw--actually two of them. I purchased an older
        > Cory for more than I really wanted to spend, and then found a like-new
        > Salton CM-4 (home burr grinder) at a local thrift shop for less than $2 the
        > very next day. Both seem to work great. I also found that Krups sells a
        > "pro" unit (GX610050) that looks very similar to the Hobart/Kitchenaid A9 if
        > anyone is in the market.
        >
        > Thanks again for the referral.
        >
        > Paul
        >
        > --- In vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com
        > <mailto:vacuumcoffeepotcollector%40yahoogroups.com> , "pawilh" <pawilh@>
        > wrote:
        > >
        > > I realize I may be a bit off topic with this one, but was wondering if
        > anyone else here has ever home-roasted? If so, are there any good reference
        > guides to taste/technique that would be helpful? I'm up to my third batch of
        > a Kenyan bean I was given to try and am finding it to be a bit citrus-ey
        > tasting--
        > >
        > > I have read that the African coffees can be like that, but I don't know
        > the difference between that type of taste, and the taste of an undercooked,
        > or improperly roasted bean.
        > >
        > > Appreciate any advice on this one, thanks!
        > >
        > > Paul
        > >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
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