Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

Re: [vacpot] Random thoughts on coffee pots.

Expand Messages
  • carol.vesperino
    I use a dish brush on my perc baskets. They used to make brushes to clean the inside of the stems, but no more. If you use large filters and fold the edges
    Message 1 of 19 , Mar 30, 2013
      I use a dish brush on my perc baskets. They used to make brushes to clean
      the inside of the stems, but no more. If you use large filters and fold the
      edges over the top before brewing, the whole thing comes out in the trash
      with a snap of the wrist. I cut a hole in the center for the stem, put in my
      coffee, fold the top edges over, put on the metal grid and make coffee. It
      keeps the grounds from going everywhere, not like the small circular disc
      filters that just sit in the bottom of the basket.

      Happy Easter!!!!!
      Carol


      In a message dated 3/30/2013 11:42:40 A.M. Eastern Daylight Time,
      larryhollenb@... writes:

      One thing I have wondered when reading many old cooking suggestions for
      coffee is to "Scald" the pot before pouring in the water.. What do you
      think that accomplishes? Does it perhaps eliminate the metallic taste that
      aluminum pots can have if not used regularly?

      The other thought is more of a tip.. In using various kinds of coffee
      makers I not having a running water system have always hated removing the
      grounds from coffee makers of various types. The deep recesses of the drip
      pots that don't use a separate basket under the water container are among the
      ones I fought with to remove grounds. Even the perk baskets can be a pain
      to remove grounds from without making a mess. What I finally hit on was
      when I got a small 5 quart pail with a handle. Now I simply add water about
      two thirds deep and drip the coffee maker parts with most of the grounds
      dumped out on some newspaper into it and a few simple twist around in the
      water an the grounds come quickly out without much fuss. I then toss the water
      and grounds on the grass or flower beds.

      Hope everyone has a great easter weekend.

      Larry



      ------------------------------------

      Yahoo! Groups Links






      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Larry Hollenberg
      Carol, I think if you look around you can find a coffee stem brush. I have one an I know others that have them.. You might try Ebay an see if someone has them
      Message 2 of 19 , Mar 30, 2013
        Carol,

        I think if you look around you can find a coffee stem brush. I have one an I know others that have them.. You might try Ebay an see if someone has them listed or a coffee speciality dealer.  And its possible they don't call them coffee pot brushes.. any very short bristle brush will work as well as Pipe cleaners if they are doubled up and inserted in the stems.. 

        Larry


        ________________________________
        From: "cvthedragonlady@..." <cvthedragonlady@...>
        To: vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Saturday, March 30, 2013 6:44 PM
        Subject: Re: [vacpot] Random thoughts on coffee pots.


         
        I use a dish brush on my perc baskets. They used to make brushes to clean
        the inside of the stems, but no more. If you use large filters and fold the
        edges over the top before brewing, the whole thing comes out in the trash
        with a snap of the wrist. I cut a hole in the center for the stem, put in my
        coffee, fold the top edges over, put on the metal grid and make coffee. It
        keeps the grounds from going everywhere, not like the small circular disc
        filters that just sit in the bottom of the basket.

        Happy Easter!!!!!
        Carol


        In a message dated 3/30/2013 11:42:40 A.M. Eastern Daylight Time,
        larryhollenb@... writes:

        One thing I have wondered when reading many old cooking suggestions for
        coffee is to "Scald" the pot before pouring in the water.. What do you
        think that accomplishes? Does it perhaps eliminate the metallic taste that
        aluminum pots can have if not used regularly?

        The other thought is more of a tip.. In using various kinds of coffee
        makers I not having a running water system have always hated removing the
        grounds from coffee makers of various types. The deep recesses of the drip
        pots that don't use a separate basket under the water container are among the
        ones I fought with to remove grounds. Even the perk baskets can be a pain
        to remove grounds from without making a mess. What I finally hit on was
        when I got a small 5 quart pail with a handle. Now I simply add water about
        two thirds deep and drip the coffee maker parts with most of the grounds
        dumped out on some newspaper into it and a few simple twist around in the
        water an the grounds come quickly out without much fuss. I then toss the water
        and grounds on the grass or flower beds.

        Hope everyone has a great easter weekend.

        Larry

        ------------------------------------

        Yahoo! Groups Links

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • carol.vesperino
        Larry, Now I use chopsticks to clean the stems. The pipe cleaners I use for the stems on my old pressure cookers. Old shoe laces work if you can thread them,
        Message 3 of 19 , Mar 30, 2013
          Larry,
          Now I use chopsticks to clean the stems. The pipe cleaners I use for
          the stems on my old pressure cookers. Old shoe laces work if you can thread
          them, too, but they are a PAIN.
          My perc pots are all Corning in various sizes, with metal baskets,
          lids and stems. No electric, though, just stove top models.
          Carol


          In a message dated 3/30/2013 9:51:14 P.M. Eastern Daylight Time,
          larryhollenb@... writes:

          Carol,

          I think if you look around you can find a coffee stem brush. I have one an
          I know others that have them.. You might try Ebay an see if someone has
          them listed or a coffee speciality dealer. And its possible they don't call
          them coffee pot brushes.. any very short bristle brush will work as well as
          Pipe cleaners if they are doubled up and inserted in the stems..

          Larry


          Yahoo! Groups Links





          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Larry Hollenberg
          Try Percolator Spout tube Brush on ebay.  There is a new one on that site that is the small type for the stems.  Larry ________________________________ From:
          Message 4 of 19 , Mar 30, 2013
            Try Percolator Spout tube Brush on ebay.  There is a new one on that site that is the small type for the stems. 

            Larry


            ________________________________
            From: Larry Hollenberg <larryhollenb@...>
            To: "vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com" <vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com>
            Sent: Saturday, March 30, 2013 8:51 PM
            Subject: Re: [vacpot] Random thoughts on coffee pots.


             
            Carol,

            I think if you look around you can find a coffee stem brush. I have one an I know others that have them.. You might try Ebay an see if someone has them listed or a coffee speciality dealer.  And its possible they don't call them coffee pot brushes.. any very short bristle brush will work as well as Pipe cleaners if they are doubled up and inserted in the stems.. 

            Larry

            ________________________________
            From: "cvthedragonlady@..." <cvthedragonlady@...>
            To: vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Saturday, March 30, 2013 6:44 PM
            Subject: Re: [vacpot] Random thoughts on coffee pots.


             
            I use a dish brush on my perc baskets. They used to make brushes to clean
            the inside of the stems, but no more. If you use large filters and fold the
            edges over the top before brewing, the whole thing comes out in the trash
            with a snap of the wrist. I cut a hole in the center for the stem, put in my
            coffee, fold the top edges over, put on the metal grid and make coffee. It
            keeps the grounds from going everywhere, not like the small circular disc
            filters that just sit in the bottom of the basket.

            Happy Easter!!!!!
            Carol

            In a message dated 3/30/2013 11:42:40 A.M. Eastern Daylight Time,
            larryhollenb@... writes:

            One thing I have wondered when reading many old cooking suggestions for
            coffee is to "Scald" the pot before pouring in the water.. What do you
            think that accomplishes? Does it perhaps eliminate the metallic taste that
            aluminum pots can have if not used regularly?

            The other thought is more of a tip.. In using various kinds of coffee
            makers I not having a running water system have always hated removing the
            grounds from coffee makers of various types. The deep recesses of the drip
            pots that don't use a separate basket under the water container are among the
            ones I fought with to remove grounds. Even the perk baskets can be a pain
            to remove grounds from without making a mess. What I finally hit on was
            when I got a small 5 quart pail with a handle. Now I simply add water about
            two thirds deep and drip the coffee maker parts with most of the grounds
            dumped out on some newspaper into it and a few simple twist around in the
            water an the grounds come quickly out without much fuss. I then toss the water
            and grounds on the grass or flower beds.

            Hope everyone has a great easter weekend.

            Larry

            ------------------------------------

            Yahoo! Groups Links

            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Roland
            There is also a fold-over paper insert specifically for percolator filter baskets It s not the same as the little disk filter that sits at the bottom. It is
            Message 5 of 19 , Mar 31, 2013
              There is also a fold-over paper insert specifically for percolator filter
              baskets It's not the same as the little disk filter that sits at the
              bottom. It is like a square napkin with a hole in the center that goes over
              the pump stem, then each of the 4 corners has a hole so you can fold them
              over and seal it. You may have to look around to find them but grocers
              often carry them, or you can get them online.



              Roland



              From: vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com
              [mailto:vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
              cvthedragonlady@...
              Sent: Saturday, March 30, 2013 5:45 PM
              To: vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com
              Subject: Re: [vacpot] Random thoughts on coffee pots.





              I use a dish brush on my perc baskets. They used to make brushes to clean
              the inside of the stems, but no more. If you use large filters and fold the
              edges over the top before brewing, the whole thing comes out in the trash
              with a snap of the wrist. I cut a hole in the center for the stem, put in my

              coffee, fold the top edges over, put on the metal grid and make coffee. It
              keeps the grounds from going everywhere, not like the small circular disc
              filters that just sit in the bottom of the basket.

              Happy Easter!!!!!
              Carol


              In a message dated 3/30/2013 11:42:40 A.M. Eastern Daylight Time,
              larryhollenb@... <mailto:larryhollenb%40yahoo.com> writes:

              One thing I have wondered when reading many old cooking suggestions for
              coffee is to "Scald" the pot before pouring in the water.. What do you
              think that accomplishes? Does it perhaps eliminate the metallic taste that
              aluminum pots can have if not used regularly?

              The other thought is more of a tip.. In using various kinds of coffee
              makers I not having a running water system have always hated removing the
              grounds from coffee makers of various types. The deep recesses of the drip
              pots that don't use a separate basket under the water container are among
              the
              ones I fought with to remove grounds. Even the perk baskets can be a pain
              to remove grounds from without making a mess. What I finally hit on was
              when I got a small 5 quart pail with a handle. Now I simply add water about
              two thirds deep and drip the coffee maker parts with most of the grounds
              dumped out on some newspaper into it and a few simple twist around in the
              water an the grounds come quickly out without much fuss. I then toss the
              water
              and grounds on the grass or flower beds.

              Hope everyone has a great easter weekend.

              Larry

              ------------------------------------

              Yahoo! Groups Links

              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • pawilh
              I ve never heard about scalding cookware before use, but I have seen some factory instructions for aluminum-ware recommending a similar procedure to remove any
              Message 6 of 19 , Mar 31, 2013
                I've never heard about scalding cookware before use, but I have seen some factory instructions for aluminum-ware recommending a similar procedure to remove any cutting oils that might have been splashed onto it during the manufacturing process. Have not seen it as part of a recipe--

                What kind of cookware was used during the 1800's? I'm thinking mainly cast iron? Maybe the scalding was to clean out the remnants of the last food cooked in there before you made the coffee. Old timers/purists claim you don't need to wash it very often once it's seasoned, just brush out the crumbs and such.

                And I can confirm the paper perc filters, I have some here made by Melitta. They are square in shape with five pre-punched holes. They insert onto the stem in the perc basket, coffee is loaded, and then the flaps fold over and also attach to the stem before the top is put on.

                Still looking at grinders btw--

                Happy Easter.

                Paul


                --- In vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com, "larry h" <larryhollenb@...> wrote:
                >
                > One thing I have wondered when reading many old cooking suggestions for coffee is to "Scald" the pot before pouring in the water.. What do you think that accomplishes? Does it perhaps eliminate the metallic taste that aluminum pots can have if not used regularly?
                >
                > The other thought is more of a tip.. In using various kinds of coffee makers I not having a running water system have always hated removing the grounds from coffee makers of various types. The deep recesses of the drip pots that don't use a separate basket under the water container are among the ones I fought with to remove grounds. Even the perk baskets can be a pain to remove grounds from without making a mess. What I finally hit on was when I got a small 5 quart pail with a handle. Now I simply add water about two thirds deep and drip the coffee maker parts with most of the grounds dumped out on some newspaper into it and a few simple twist around in the water an the grounds come quickly out without much fuss. I then toss the water and grounds on the grass or flower beds.
                >
                > Hope everyone has a great easter weekend.
                >
                > Larry
                >
              • Larry Hollenberg
                I am considering a better grinder and I recall some discussions around a Meistro or something like that.. Is that still the best mid range grinder?  I ended
                Message 7 of 19 , Mar 31, 2013
                  I am considering a better grinder and I recall some discussions around a Meistro or something like that.. Is that still the best mid range grinder? 

                  I ended up having a issue that heavily suggest that I not drink much regular coffee, ( or they would prefer none) but I am hanging on to using 80% decaf beans to 20% regular which seems to not be effecting me negatively. 

                  Larry





                  ________________________________
                  From: pawilh <pawilh@...>
                  To: vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com
                  Sent: Sunday, March 31, 2013 1:54 PM
                  Subject: [vacpot] Re: Random thoughts on coffee pots.


                   

                  I've never heard about scalding cookware before use, but I have seen some factory instructions for aluminum-ware recommending a similar procedure to remove any cutting oils that might have been splashed onto it during the manufacturing process. Have not seen it as part of a recipe--

                  What kind of cookware was used during the 1800's? I'm thinking mainly cast iron? Maybe the scalding was to clean out the remnants of the last food cooked in there before you made the coffee. Old timers/purists claim you don't need to wash it very often once it's seasoned, just brush out the crumbs and such.

                  And I can confirm the paper perc filters, I have some here made by Melitta. They are square in shape with five pre-punched holes. They insert onto the stem in the perc basket, coffee is loaded, and then the flaps fold over and also attach to the stem before the top is put on.

                  Still looking at grinders btw--

                  Happy Easter.

                  Paul

                  --- In vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com, "larry h" <larryhollenb@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > One thing I have wondered when reading many old cooking suggestions for coffee is to "Scald" the pot before pouring in the water.. What do you think that accomplishes? Does it perhaps eliminate the metallic taste that aluminum pots can have if not used regularly?
                  >
                  > The other thought is more of a tip.. In using various kinds of coffee makers I not having a running water system have always hated removing the grounds from coffee makers of various types. The deep recesses of the drip pots that don't use a separate basket under the water container are among the ones I fought with to remove grounds. Even the perk baskets can be a pain to remove grounds from without making a mess. What I finally hit on was when I got a small 5 quart pail with a handle. Now I simply add water about two thirds deep and drip the coffee maker parts with most of the grounds dumped out on some newspaper into it and a few simple twist around in the water an the grounds come quickly out without much fuss. I then toss the water and grounds on the grass or flower beds.
                  >
                  > Hope everyone has a great easter weekend.
                  >
                  > Larry
                  >




                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • iwillie_512
                  Hey Larry! I ve been using a Capresso Infinity conical burr grinder (Mod #560) for about 6 years now and it is absolutely great! I brush it out occasionally
                  Message 8 of 19 , Mar 31, 2013
                    Hey Larry!

                    I've been using a Capresso Infinity conical burr grinder (Mod #560) for about 6 years now and it is absolutely great! I brush it out occasionally and have had zero problems. It was less than $100 back then.

                    dave k

                    --- In vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com, Larry Hollenberg <larryhollenb@...> wrote:
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > I am considering a better grinder and I recall some discussions around a Meistro or something like that.. Is that still the best mid range grinder? 
                    >
                    > I ended up having a issue that heavily suggest that I not drink much regular coffee, ( or they would prefer none) but I am hanging on to using 80% decaf beans to 20% regular which seems to not be effecting me negatively. 
                    >
                    > Larry
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                  • Dave Bellware
                    Baratza addressed a couple of issues, and ignored a couple of others, when they replaced their Maestro coffee grinder with the Encore, about a year ago. Many
                    Message 9 of 19 , Mar 31, 2013
                      Baratza addressed a couple of issues, and ignored a couple of others, when
                      they replaced their Maestro coffee grinder with the Encore, about a year
                      ago.

                      Many people say that the Encore is the lowest priced electric grinder that
                      it capable of an even grind over a wide range of grind levels. I certainly
                      noticed a huge difference in taste, due to improvement of grind
                      consistency, in my drip-brewed and vacuum-brewed coffee once I got my
                      Encore. The reason that the Encore does not produce fines, the powder that
                      accompanies grinding done with less capable grinders, is because the burrs
                      and mechanism are of sufficient quality to shave, rather than crush, the
                      coffee beans.

                      For true espresso made with non-pressurized portafilter espresso machines,
                      the Encore cannot produce the very fine necessary grind according to most
                      of those who make such espresso regularly, but it's significantly lower in
                      price than those electric grinders that are agreed to be truly
                      espresso-capable.

                      It's hard to find the Encore for any more, or for any less, than $129, but
                      free shipping is available from many sellers.

                      My only personal experiences are with a Mr Coffee burr grinder which I
                      replaced with an Encore almost a year ago. The difference is enormous.

                      Dave Bellware



                      On Sun, Mar 31, 2013 at 3:56 PM, Larry Hollenberg <larryhollenb@...>wrote:

                      > **
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > I am considering a better grinder and I recall some discussions around a
                      > Meistro or something like that.. Is that still the best mid range grinder?
                      >
                      > I ended up having a issue that heavily suggest that I not drink much
                      > regular coffee, ( or they would prefer none) but I am hanging on to using
                      > 80% decaf beans to 20% regular which seems to not be effecting me
                      > negatively.
                      >
                      > Larry
                      >
                      > ________________________________
                      > From: pawilh <pawilh@...>
                      > To: vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com
                      > Sent: Sunday, March 31, 2013 1:54 PM
                      > Subject: [vacpot] Re: Random thoughts on coffee pots.
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > I've never heard about scalding cookware before use, but I have seen some
                      > factory instructions for aluminum-ware recommending a similar procedure to
                      > remove any cutting oils that might have been splashed onto it during the
                      > manufacturing process. Have not seen it as part of a recipe--
                      >
                      > What kind of cookware was used during the 1800's? I'm thinking mainly cast
                      > iron? Maybe the scalding was to clean out the remnants of the last food
                      > cooked in there before you made the coffee. Old timers/purists claim you
                      > don't need to wash it very often once it's seasoned, just brush out the
                      > crumbs and such.
                      >
                      > And I can confirm the paper perc filters, I have some here made by
                      > Melitta. They are square in shape with five pre-punched holes. They insert
                      > onto the stem in the perc basket, coffee is loaded, and then the flaps fold
                      > over and also attach to the stem before the top is put on.
                      >
                      > Still looking at grinders btw--
                      >
                      > Happy Easter.
                      >
                      > Paul
                      >
                      > --- In vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com, "larry h" <larryhollenb@...>
                      > wrote:
                      > >
                      > > One thing I have wondered when reading many old cooking suggestions for
                      > coffee is to "Scald" the pot before pouring in the water.. What do you
                      > think that accomplishes? Does it perhaps eliminate the metallic taste that
                      > aluminum pots can have if not used regularly?
                      > >
                      > > The other thought is more of a tip.. In using various kinds of coffee
                      > makers I not having a running water system have always hated removing the
                      > grounds from coffee makers of various types. The deep recesses of the drip
                      > pots that don't use a separate basket under the water container are among
                      > the ones I fought with to remove grounds. Even the perk baskets can be a
                      > pain to remove grounds from without making a mess. What I finally hit on
                      > was when I got a small 5 quart pail with a handle. Now I simply add water
                      > about two thirds deep and drip the coffee maker parts with most of the
                      > grounds dumped out on some newspaper into it and a few simple twist around
                      > in the water an the grounds come quickly out without much fuss. I then toss
                      > the water and grounds on the grass or flower beds.
                      > >
                      > > Hope everyone has a great easter weekend.
                      > >
                      > > Larry
                      > >
                      >
                      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      >
                      >
                      >


                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    • Larry Hollenberg
                      Dave, Thanks that is the one I recall now that I see the name..  I too purchased the Mr. Coffee due to its low end price and didn t read the reviews on it.. I
                      Message 10 of 19 , Mar 31, 2013
                        Dave,

                        Thanks that is the one I recall now that I see the name..  I too purchased the Mr. Coffee due to its low end price and didn't read the reviews on it.. I don't mind the grind do much as I do the total mess it makes due to the awful lid full of traps and made of vinyl.  I always have a mess to clean up when I use it.. Yes too the grind is surely not consistent by any means either but I am not quite to picky about that as some. But I do appreciate a decent design and recalled that one was not so prone to issues like the Mr. Coffee.  

                        Larry


                        ________________________________
                        From: Dave Bellware <bigbells@...>
                        To: vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com
                        Sent: Sunday, March 31, 2013 4:19 PM
                        Subject: Re: [vacpot] Re: Random thoughts on coffee pots. Ginders.

                        Baratza addressed a couple of issues, and ignored a couple of others, when
                        they replaced their Maestro coffee grinder with the Encore, about a year
                        ago.

                        Many people say that the Encore is the lowest priced electric grinder that
                        it capable of an even grind over a wide range of grind levels. I certainly
                        noticed a huge difference in taste, due to improvement of grind
                        consistency, in my drip-brewed and vacuum-brewed coffee once I got my
                        Encore. The reason that the Encore does not produce fines, the powder that
                        accompanies grinding done with less capable grinders, is because the burrs
                        and mechanism are of sufficient quality to shave, rather than crush, the
                        coffee beans.

                        For true espresso made with non-pressurized portafilter espresso machines,
                        the Encore cannot produce the very fine necessary grind according to most
                        of those who make such espresso regularly, but it's significantly lower in
                        price than those electric grinders that are agreed to be truly
                        espresso-capable.

                        It's hard to find the Encore for any more, or for any less, than $129, but
                        free shipping is available from many sellers.

                        My only personal experiences are with a Mr Coffee burr grinder which I
                        replaced with an Encore almost a year ago. The difference is enormous.

                        Dave Bellware



                        On Sun, Mar 31, 2013 at 3:56 PM, Larry Hollenberg <larryhollenb@...>wrote:

                        > **
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        > I am considering a better grinder and I recall some discussions around a
                        > Meistro or something like that.. Is that still the best mid range grinder?
                        >
                        > I ended up having a issue that heavily suggest that I not drink much
                        > regular coffee, ( or they would prefer none) but I am hanging on to using
                        > 80% decaf beans to 20% regular which seems to not be effecting me
                        > negatively.
                        >
                        > Larry
                        >
                        > ________________________________
                        > From: pawilh <pawilh@...>
                        > To: vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com
                        > Sent: Sunday, March 31, 2013 1:54 PM
                        > Subject: [vacpot] Re: Random thoughts on coffee pots.
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        > I've never heard about scalding cookware before use, but I have seen some
                        > factory instructions for aluminum-ware recommending a similar procedure to
                        > remove any cutting oils that might have been splashed onto it during the
                        > manufacturing process. Have not seen it as part of a recipe--
                        >
                        > What kind of cookware was used during the 1800's? I'm thinking mainly cast
                        > iron? Maybe the scalding was to clean out the remnants of the last food
                        > cooked in there before you made the coffee. Old timers/purists claim you
                        > don't need to wash it very often once it's seasoned, just brush out the
                        > crumbs and such.
                        >
                        > And I can confirm the paper perc filters, I have some here made by
                        > Melitta. They are square in shape with five pre-punched holes. They insert
                        > onto the stem in the perc basket, coffee is loaded, and then the flaps fold
                        > over and also attach to the stem before the top is put on.
                        >
                        > Still looking at grinders btw--
                        >
                        > Happy Easter.
                        >
                        > Paul
                        >
                        > --- In vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com, "larry h" <larryhollenb@...>
                        > wrote:
                        > >
                        > > One thing I have wondered when reading many old cooking suggestions for
                        > coffee is to "Scald" the pot before pouring in the water.. What do you
                        > think that accomplishes? Does it perhaps eliminate the metallic taste that
                        > aluminum pots can have if not used regularly?
                        > >
                        > > The other thought is more of a tip.. In using various kinds of coffee
                        > makers I not having a running water system have always hated removing the
                        > grounds from coffee makers of various types. The deep recesses of the drip
                        > pots that don't use a separate basket under the water container are among
                        > the ones I fought with to remove grounds. Even the perk baskets can be a
                        > pain to remove grounds from without making a mess. What I finally hit on
                        > was when I got a small 5 quart pail with a handle. Now I simply add water
                        > about two thirds deep and drip the coffee maker parts with most of the
                        > grounds dumped out on some newspaper into it and a few simple twist around
                        > in the water an the grounds come quickly out without much fuss. I then toss
                        > the water and grounds on the grass or flower beds.
                        > >
                        > > Hope everyone has a great easter weekend.
                        > >
                        > > Larry
                        > >
                        >
                        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        >

                        >


                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



                        ------------------------------------

                        Yahoo! Groups Links



                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      • Dave Bellware
                        I also have heard good things about the Capresso Infinity and I believe it s still under $100. Larry: If neatness is a bigger priority than grind quality, I
                        Message 11 of 19 , Mar 31, 2013
                          I also have heard good things about the Capresso Infinity and I believe
                          it's still under $100.

                          Larry: If neatness is a bigger priority than grind quality, I can't
                          recommend the Encore. No matter what you do, there are going to be grinds
                          that remain in the chute with each use. They will, I guarantee, fall out
                          into the base and onto your counter once you remove the plastic grounds
                          container. It makes a bit of a mess.

                          Another Encore user said he was able to greatly alleviate that problem by
                          folding a strip of aluminum foil all around the opening of the grounds
                          container. I haven't tried that yet but I'm about to.

                          Dave Bellware

                          On Sun, Mar 31, 2013 at 5:18 PM, iwillie_512 <kast.iron@...> wrote:

                          > **
                          >
                          >
                          > Hey Larry!
                          >
                          > I've been using a Capresso Infinity conical burr grinder (Mod #560) for
                          > about 6 years now and it is absolutely great! I brush it out occasionally
                          > and have had zero problems. It was less than $100 back then.
                          >
                          > dave k
                          >
                          > --- In vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com, Larry Hollenberg
                          > <larryhollenb@...> wrote:
                          > >
                          > >
                          > >
                          > > I am considering a better grinder and I recall some discussions around a
                          > Meistro or something like that.. Is that still the best mid range grinder?�
                          > >
                          > > I ended up having a issue that heavily suggest that I not drink much
                          > regular coffee, ( or they would prefer none) but I am hanging on to using
                          > 80% decaf beans to 20% regular which seems to not be effecting me
                          > negatively.�
                          > >
                          > > Larry
                          > >
                          > >
                          > >
                          > >
                          > >
                          >
                          >
                          >


                          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        • Larry Hollenberg
                          Thanks for that tip Dave, it would appear to be a rather common problem with a grinder. Our old wall grinder will hang onto some grounds and drop them if you
                          Message 12 of 19 , Mar 31, 2013
                            Thanks for that tip Dave, it would appear to be a rather common problem with a grinder. Our old wall grinder will hang onto some grounds and drop them if you bump the glass against the bottom when removing it.  The big problem with the Mr. Coffee is the side exit which throws a big build up of very fine grinds against the plastic container an all over the inside of the removable top which as I mentioned has a lot of design parts that cause it to hold the finer grinds and  they always want to go everywhere in simply removing the top. 

                            Maybe someone has a design that works well but is not so prone to making messes? 

                            Larry


                            ________________________________
                            From: Dave Bellware <bigbells@...>
                            To: vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com
                            Sent: Sunday, March 31, 2013 4:55 PM
                            Subject: Re: [vacpot] Re: Random thoughts on coffee pots. Ginders.

                            I also have heard good things about the Capresso Infinity and I believe
                            it's still under $100.

                            Larry: If neatness is a bigger priority than grind quality, I can't
                            recommend the Encore. No matter what you do, there are going to be grinds
                            that remain in the chute with each use. They will, I guarantee, fall out
                            into the base and onto your counter once you remove the plastic grounds
                            container. It makes a bit of a mess.

                            Another Encore user said he was able to greatly alleviate that problem by
                            folding a strip of aluminum foil all around the opening of the grounds
                            container. I haven't tried that yet but I'm about to.

                            Dave Bellware

                            On Sun, Mar 31, 2013 at 5:18 PM, iwillie_512 <kast.iron@...> wrote:

                            > **
                            >
                            >
                            > Hey Larry!
                            >
                            > I've been using a Capresso Infinity conical burr grinder (Mod #560) for
                            > about 6 years now and it is absolutely great! I brush it out occasionally
                            > and have had zero problems. It was less than $100 back then.
                            >
                            > dave k
                            >
                            > --- In vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com, Larry Hollenberg
                            > <larryhollenb@...> wrote:
                            > >
                            > >
                            > >
                            > > I am considering a better grinder and I recall some discussions around a
                            > Meistro or something like that.. Is that still the best mid range grinder?Â
                            > >
                            > > I ended up having a issue that heavily suggest that I not drink much
                            > regular coffee, ( or they would prefer none) but I am hanging on to using
                            > 80% decaf beans to 20% regular which seems to not be effecting me
                            > negatively.Â
                            > >
                            > > Larry
                            > >
                            > >
                            > >
                            > >
                            > >
                            >

                            >


                            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



                            ------------------------------------

                            Yahoo! Groups Links



                            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                          • Ken Sann
                            Until recently I worked in the commercial coffee brewer industry, and we found that this was actually caused by static electricity created when the motors were
                            Message 13 of 19 , Mar 31, 2013
                              Until recently I worked in the commercial coffee brewer industry, and we
                              found that this was actually caused by static electricity created when the
                              motors were running.
                              Not and easy problem to solve on the consumer end.
                              Use a small brush often.


                              ken



                              Ken Sann



                              On Sun, Mar 31, 2013 at 5:10 PM, Larry Hollenberg <larryhollenb@...>wrote:

                              > **
                              >
                              >
                              > Thanks for that tip Dave, it would appear to be a rather common problem
                              > with a grinder. Our old wall grinder will hang onto some grounds and drop
                              > them if you bump the glass against the bottom when removing it. The big
                              > problem with the Mr. Coffee is the side exit which throws a big build up of
                              > very fine grinds against the plastic container an all over the inside of
                              > the removable top which as I mentioned has a lot of design parts that cause
                              > it to hold the finer grinds and they always want to go everywhere in
                              > simply removing the top.
                              >
                              > Maybe someone has a design that works well but is not so prone to making
                              > messes?
                              >
                              > Larry,_._,___
                              >


                              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                            • carol.vesperino
                              Roland, I used to buy those, but I get the large basket filters free from work every time they change the style. Right now I have 4 large bags of them here
                              Message 14 of 19 , Apr 1, 2013
                                Roland,
                                I used to buy those, but I get the large basket filters free from
                                work every time they change the style. Right now I have 4 large bags of them
                                here and it seems they will last quite some time. Free is always good and
                                they would throw the old style out.
                                Carol


                                In a message dated 3/31/2013 12:56:02 P.M. Eastern Daylight Time,
                                rsburritt@... writes:

                                There is also a fold-over paper insert specifically for percolator filter
                                baskets It's not the same as the little disk filter that sits at the
                                bottom. It is like a square napkin with a hole in the center that goes
                                over
                                the pump stem, then each of the 4 corners has a hole so you can fold them
                                over and seal it. You may have to look around to find them but grocers
                                often carry them, or you can get them online.



                                Roland


                                ------------------------------------

                                Yahoo! Groups Links

                                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





                                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



                                ------------------------------------

                                Yahoo! Groups Links






                                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                              • carol.vesperino
                                Larry, They look like the brushes in my gun cleaning kit. Maybe I should try one of the smaller calibers to see if it ll work. Carol In a message dated
                                Message 15 of 19 , Apr 1, 2013
                                  Larry,
                                  They look like the brushes in my gun cleaning kit. Maybe I should try
                                  one of the smaller calibers to see if it'll work.
                                  Carol


                                  In a message dated 3/30/2013 10:58:21 P.M. Eastern Daylight Time,
                                  larryhollenb@... writes:

                                  Try Percolator Spout tube Brush on ebay. There is a new one on that site
                                  that is the small type for the stems.

                                  Larry


                                  ________________________________
                                  From: Larry Hollenberg <larryhollenb@...>
                                  To: "vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com"
                                  <vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com>
                                  Sent: Saturday, March 30, 2013 8:51 PM
                                  Subject: Re: [vacpot] Random thoughts on coffee pots.



                                  Carol,

                                  I think if you look around you can find a coffee stem brush. I have one an
                                  I know others that have them.. You might try Ebay an see if someone has
                                  them listed or a coffee speciality dealer. And its possible they don't call
                                  them coffee pot brushes.. any very short bristle brush will work as well as
                                  Pipe cleaners if they are doubled up and inserted in the stems..

                                  Larry

                                  ________________________________
                                  ------------------------------------

                                  Yahoo! Groups Links

                                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

                                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




                                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



                                  ------------------------------------

                                  Yahoo! Groups Links





                                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                • Roland
                                  I did a little googling. It may be that scalding was merely to bring the pot up to temperature before actually doing the cooking. Roland From:
                                  Message 16 of 19 , Apr 1, 2013
                                    I did a little googling. It may be that scalding was merely to bring the pot
                                    up to temperature before actually doing the cooking.



                                    Roland



                                    From: vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com
                                    [mailto:vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of larry h
                                    Sent: Saturday, March 30, 2013 9:42 AM
                                    To: vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com
                                    Subject: [vacpot] Random thoughts on coffee pots.





                                    One thing I have wondered when reading many old cooking suggestions for
                                    coffee is to "Scald" the pot before pouring in the water.. What do you think
                                    that accomplishes? Does it perhaps eliminate the metallic taste that
                                    aluminum pots can have if not used regularly?

                                    The other thought is more of a tip.. In using various kinds of coffee makers
                                    I not having a running water system have always hated removing the grounds
                                    from coffee makers of various types. The deep recesses of the drip pots that
                                    don't use a separate basket under the water container are among the ones I
                                    fought with to remove grounds. Even the perk baskets can be a pain to remove
                                    grounds from without making a mess. What I finally hit on was when I got a
                                    small 5 quart pail with a handle. Now I simply add water about two thirds
                                    deep and drip the coffee maker parts with most of the grounds dumped out on
                                    some newspaper into it and a few simple twist around in the water an the
                                    grounds come quickly out without much fuss. I then toss the water and
                                    grounds on the grass or flower beds.

                                    Hope everyone has a great easter weekend.

                                    Larry





                                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                  • Roland
                                    There was also copper and tinware. If I m not mistaken, the word tinker comes from this. Roland From: vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com
                                    Message 17 of 19 , Apr 1, 2013
                                      There was also copper and tinware. If I'm not mistaken, the word "tinker"
                                      comes from this.

                                      Roland





                                      From: vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com
                                      [mailto:vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of pawilh
                                      Sent: Sunday, March 31, 2013 12:54 PM
                                      To: vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com
                                      Subject: [vacpot] Re: Random thoughts on coffee pots.






                                      I've never heard about scalding cookware before use, but I have seen some
                                      factory instructions for aluminum-ware recommending a similar procedure to
                                      remove any cutting oils that might have been splashed onto it during the
                                      manufacturing process. Have not seen it as part of a recipe--

                                      What kind of cookware was used during the 1800's? I'm thinking mainly cast
                                      iron? Maybe the scalding was to clean out the remnants of the last food
                                      cooked in there before you made the coffee. Old timers/purists claim you
                                      don't need to wash it very often once it's seasoned, just brush out the
                                      crumbs and such.

                                      And I can confirm the paper perc filters, I have some here made by Melitta.
                                      They are square in shape with five pre-punched holes. They insert onto the
                                      stem in the perc basket, coffee is loaded, and then the flaps fold over and
                                      also attach to the stem before the top is put on.

                                      Still looking at grinders btw--

                                      Happy Easter.

                                      Paul

                                      --- In vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com
                                      <mailto:vacuumcoffeepotcollector%40yahoogroups.com> , "larry h"
                                      <larryhollenb@...> wrote:
                                      >
                                      > One thing I have wondered when reading many old cooking suggestions for
                                      coffee is to "Scald" the pot before pouring in the water.. What do you think
                                      that accomplishes? Does it perhaps eliminate the metallic taste that
                                      aluminum pots can have if not used regularly?
                                      >
                                      > The other thought is more of a tip.. In using various kinds of coffee
                                      makers I not having a running water system have always hated removing the
                                      grounds from coffee makers of various types. The deep recesses of the drip
                                      pots that don't use a separate basket under the water container are among
                                      the ones I fought with to remove grounds. Even the perk baskets can be a
                                      pain to remove grounds from without making a mess. What I finally hit on was
                                      when I got a small 5 quart pail with a handle. Now I simply add water about
                                      two thirds deep and drip the coffee maker parts with most of the grounds
                                      dumped out on some newspaper into it and a few simple twist around in the
                                      water an the grounds come quickly out without much fuss. I then toss the
                                      water and grounds on the grass or flower beds.
                                      >
                                      > Hope everyone has a great easter weekend.
                                      >
                                      > Larry
                                      >





                                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.