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Re: [vacpot] vintage grinders

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  • Nancy Curtis
    Ok.....drat.....I forgot to mention that I have an old Sunbeam mixer coffee grinder attachment that fits my 1930 s and 1940 s Models 3A and 7B. Itean is neat
    Message 1 of 17 , Mar 24 5:34 PM
      Ok.....drat.....I forgot to mention that I have an old Sunbeam mixer coffee grinder attachment that fits my 1930's and 1940's Models 3A and 7B. Itean is neat to watch and also grinds the beans perfectly. I also have a coffee grinder attachment for my 1930's Fitzgerald Magic Maid mixer. A very interesting attachment and worked great the one time I tried it out to see if it worked. It took me a while to find the right size old Hazel Atlas canning jar that fits on the part where the ground coffee comes out. The upper jar that holds the beans came with the attachment but the smaller bottom jar was missing. I finally, after several years of searching, realized that I already had one of the small jars....it just had jam in it...lol. Used that jam and put the jar on the attachment.....worked fine. No more jam for THAT jar.


      I would probably use the Sunbeam attachment grinder if I kept either of those mixers out on the counter all of the time. It is an easy attachment to put on and take off but I just don't have room to leave it out all of the time. You would have thought that a 100 year old kitchen would have been built with lots of counter-top space but this one was not. It is not what you call a "cook's kitchen" but it is what it is and since I love the rest of the house, I have to adjust my cooking to fit it.



      Nancy C.

      ----- Original Message -----





      Ok, so I'm starting to do some home-roasting using a hot air popper. I've watched a ton of how-to videos on the Youtube, and actually found an area roaster who sold me some green beans. My first 1/2cup batch didn't fare so well, but after I cleared the smoke out of our kitchen I moved my operations outside and nailed three batches of Sumatra.

      Anyway, what types of home grinders were in use during the 30's and 40's, if any, and are any of them still usable by today's standards? Specifically, I would like to find something that is dependable, and still grinds well (ie, low waste/dust)--

      I like the looks and functionality of the Arcade wall-mount rigs, but they are generally very costly, and a person would likely have to buy at least two of them in order to have spare parts on hand.

      I also like the electric Kitchen Aid A-9, but have the same concerns--

      Thoughts?

      Paul




      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • carol.vesperino
      Paul, The PeDe is the one with the ceramic windmill hopper, but you have to watch as there are copies out there where the grinding mechanism is plastic, not
      Message 2 of 17 , Mar 24 7:01 PM
        Paul,
        The PeDe is the one with the ceramic windmill hopper, but you have to
        watch as there are copies out there where the grinding mechanism is
        plastic, not metal.
        If there's rust in an Arcade type, take it apart (very easily done)
        and wire brush it. I have never paid more than $40 for any of mine. The
        Arcades adjust grind as do the PeDe grinders and the Brighton. The lap grinder
        only grinds perk coffee, not finer grinds.
        One of my Arcades has a glass globe from a ceiling fan light as a
        hopper, with a lid over it to keep dust out and the beans in while grinding.
        The catch cup is a very small Mason jar for jelly. I have one Arcade with a
        punch bowl cup for the catch cup and I had to rig the holder for it out of
        angle braces and bolts, but it works just fine. It's not the original
        look, more like a steampunk grinder now. LOL!!!
        Most of mine I got off Etsy, where they go for anywhere from fair to
        OMG prices.
        Carol



        In a message dated 3/24/2013 8:32:40 P.M. Eastern Daylight Time,
        pawilh@... writes:

        Good to know, thanks. I actually saw an Arcade model 25 locally in need
        of new glass and a good cleaning. Price was reasonable--I'll look at it
        again later in the week. Looked like the burrs had some rust on them.

        Not familiar with the PeDe unit.

        I also saw a German/Dutch wall grinder with a white porcelain hopper
        (windmill), and although I wasn't too intrigued by it, I did like the hand-crank
        mechanism and the way it adjusted for grind.

        Paul

        > ------------------------------------
        >
        > Yahoo! Groups Links
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >




        ------------------------------------

        Yahoo! Groups Links






        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • rbennett47
        Post war, Sunbeam made a coffee-grinder attachement for their Mixmaster kitchen mixer. Good Luck finding one though.. Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE
        Message 3 of 17 , Mar 24 8:32 PM
          Post war, Sunbeam made a coffee-grinder attachement for their Mixmaster kitchen mixer. Good Luck finding one though..


          Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE Smartphone

          -------- Original message --------
          From: pawilh <pawilh@...>
          Date: 03/24/2013 3:55 PM (GMT-08:00)
          To: vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: [vacpot] vintage grinders

          Ok, so I'm starting to do some home-roasting using a hot air popper. I've watched a ton of how-to videos on the Youtube, and actually found an area roaster who sold me some green beans. My first 1/2cup batch didn't fare so well, but after I cleared the smoke out of our kitchen I moved my operations outside and nailed three batches of Sumatra.

          Anyway, what types of home grinders were in use during the 30's and 40's, if any, and are any of them still usable by today's standards? Specifically, I would like to find something that is dependable, and still grinds well (ie, low waste/dust)--

          I like the looks and functionality of the Arcade wall-mount rigs, but they are generally very costly, and a person would likely have to buy at least two of them in order to have spare parts on hand.

          I also like the electric Kitchen Aid A-9, but have the same concerns--

          Thoughts?

          Paul



          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • pawilh
          Ok, appreciate the info on that. I d seen pictures of them online, and then saw one at a shop in CHI that had the metal grinder. Mechanism was nice, but I m
          Message 4 of 17 , Mar 24 8:43 PM
            Ok, appreciate the info on that. I'd seen pictures of them online, and then saw one at a shop in CHI that had the metal grinder. Mechanism was nice, but I'm not a big windmill guy. I may just pick up the Arcade rig I saw and go from there--


            --- In vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com, cvthedragonlady@... wrote:
            >
            > Paul,
            > The PeDe is the one with the ceramic windmill hopper, but you have to
            > watch as there are copies out there where the grinding mechanism is
            > plastic, not metal.
            > If there's rust in an Arcade type, take it apart (very easily done)
            > and wire brush it. I have never paid more than $40 for any of mine. The
            > Arcades adjust grind as do the PeDe grinders and the Brighton. The lap grinder
            > only grinds perk coffee, not finer grinds.
            > One of my Arcades has a glass globe from a ceiling fan light as a
            > hopper, with a lid over it to keep dust out and the beans in while grinding.
            > The catch cup is a very small Mason jar for jelly. I have one Arcade with a
            > punch bowl cup for the catch cup and I had to rig the holder for it out of
            > angle braces and bolts, but it works just fine. It's not the original
            > look, more like a steampunk grinder now. LOL!!!
            > Most of mine I got off Etsy, where they go for anywhere from fair to
            > OMG prices.
            > Carol
            >
            >
            >
            > In a message dated 3/24/2013 8:32:40 P.M. Eastern Daylight Time,
            > pawilh@... writes:
            >
            > Good to know, thanks. I actually saw an Arcade model 25 locally in need
            > of new glass and a good cleaning. Price was reasonable--I'll look at it
            > again later in the week. Looked like the burrs had some rust on them.
            >
            > Not familiar with the PeDe unit.
            >
            > I also saw a German/Dutch wall grinder with a white porcelain hopper
            > (windmill), and although I wasn't too intrigued by it, I did like the hand-crank
            > mechanism and the way it adjusted for grind.
            >
            > Paul
            >
            > > ------------------------------------
            > >
            > > Yahoo! Groups Links
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            > >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > ------------------------------------
            >
            > Yahoo! Groups Links
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
          • Nancy Curtis
            I found my Sunbeam coffee-grinder attachment on ebay.....got it for a good price but it was still about $115 plus shipping. They can sell for quite a bit
            Message 5 of 17 , Mar 24 8:50 PM
              I found my Sunbeam coffee-grinder attachment on ebay.....got it for a good price but it was still about $115 plus shipping. They can sell for quite a bit higher sometimes. I was lucky because I never thought that I would ever find one that I could come anywhere close to being able to buy. I think not many people were paying attention on that particular listing although I had to watch the end of the listing and put in an extra snipe bid to make sure I would get it. I loved my birthday present that summer!! You can go to this website: www.decodan.com to see vintage Sunbeam attachments, many of which I have. The coffee-grinder, which started production in June of 1933, is shown about half-way down the page. Someday I hope to find a potato/apple peeler that I can afford too.


              Nancy C.

              ----- Original Message -----





              Post war, Sunbeam made a coffee-grinder attachement for their Mixmaster kitchen mixer. Good Luck finding one though..

              Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE Smartphone

              -------- Original message --------
              From: pawilh < pawilh@... >
              Date: 03/24/2013 3:55 PM (GMT-08:00)
              To: vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com
              Subject: [vacpot] vintage grinders

              Ok, so I'm starting to do some home-roasting using a hot air popper. I've watched a ton of how-to videos on the Youtube, and actually found an area roaster who sold me some green beans. My first 1/2cup batch didn't fare so well, but after I cleared the smoke out of our kitchen I moved my operations outside and nailed three batches of Sumatra.

              Anyway, what types of home grinders were in use during the 30's and 40's, if any, and are any of them still usable by today's standards? Specifically, I would like to find something that is dependable, and still grinds well (ie, low waste/dust)--

              I like the looks and functionality of the Arcade wall-mount rigs, but they are generally very costly, and a person would likely have to buy at least two of them in order to have spare parts on hand.

              I also like the electric Kitchen Aid A-9, but have the same concerns--

              Thoughts?

              Paul

              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • pawilh
              I ve heard of those, but have never seen one.
              Message 6 of 17 , Mar 24 8:51 PM
                I've heard of those, but have never seen one.


                --- In vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com, rbennett47 <rbennett47@...> wrote:
                >
                > Post war, Sunbeam made a coffee-grinder attachement for their Mixmaster kitchen mixer. Good Luck finding one though..
                >
                >
                > Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE Smartphone
                >
                > -------- Original message --------
                > From: pawilh <pawilh@...>
                > Date: 03/24/2013 3:55 PM (GMT-08:00)
                > To: vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com
                > Subject: [vacpot] vintage grinders
                >
                > Ok, so I'm starting to do some home-roasting using a hot air popper. I've watched a ton of how-to videos on the Youtube, and actually found an area roaster who sold me some green beans. My first 1/2cup batch didn't fare so well, but after I cleared the smoke out of our kitchen I moved my operations outside and nailed three batches of Sumatra.
                >
                > Anyway, what types of home grinders were in use during the 30's and 40's, if any, and are any of them still usable by today's standards? Specifically, I would like to find something that is dependable, and still grinds well (ie, low waste/dust)--
                >
                > I like the looks and functionality of the Arcade wall-mount rigs, but they are generally very costly, and a person would likely have to buy at least two of them in order to have spare parts on hand.
                >
                > I also like the electric Kitchen Aid A-9, but have the same concerns--
                >
                > Thoughts?
                >
                > Paul
                >
                >
                >
                > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                >
              • Phil Warner
                Anyway, what types of home grinders were in use during the 30 s and 40 s, if any, and are any of them still usable by today s standards? Specifically, I would
                Message 7 of 17 , Mar 25 11:18 AM
                  Anyway, what types of home grinders were in use during the 30's and 40's, if any, and are
                  any of them still usable by today's standards? Specifically, I would like to find
                  something that is dependable, and still grinds well (ie, low waste/dust)--



                  We’d had one of those no-name, reproduction, decorative,
                  wooden-box-with-black-iron-crank coffee grinders that sat on a kitchen shelf for many
                  years before I bought a C30C and began buying whole beans. My wife used a little electric
                  whirling blade food processor type grinder that made extremely fine dust along with the
                  grind, so one day I decided to see if the wooden box grinder would actually grind beans
                  and was pleasantly surprised to find it does a very good job and is even adjustable from
                  course to relatively fine without making the fine dust of the whirly blade thing. I have
                  seen these in thrift stores and flea markets from time to time for not much money (thrift
                  stores sometimes price them at just a couple of bucks – flea markets usually 15 to 30) and
                  there are always a bunch of these on eBay. I later bought a smaller “real” vintage
                  European coffee grinder for $20 at a flea market that ground beans very similarly to the
                  no-name grinder, (both took the same number of cranks to grind a measured amount of
                  beans), but its drawer is too small for everyday use unless you fill it several times so
                  it went to the RV for those 2 cup mornings.

                  I also saw a large red vintage “professional?” electric coffee grinder at a flea market
                  last week and was intrigued but not quite $175 worth of intrigued; I expect the wife
                  would object to this large red behemoth sitting on “HER” kitchen counter, but I have
                  thought about it several times since and may go back and make an offer.


                  Cheers, Phil Warner in Arkansas
                • carol.vesperino
                  Those little general store sized grinders are usually very expensive. At that price someone will have bought it to sell online for big bucks. I see then
                  Message 8 of 17 , Mar 25 11:48 AM
                    Those little general store sized grinders are usually very expensive. At
                    that price someone will have bought it to sell online for big bucks. I see
                    then restored on TV every once in a while, and they are a lot of money. You
                    had best grab it if it's still there for that kind of money --- if all the
                    parts are there, that is.
                    Carol V___PA.


                    In a message dated 3/25/2013 2:18:38 P.M. Eastern Daylight Time,
                    philwarner@... writes:


                    I also saw a large red vintage “professional?” electric coffee grinder at
                    a flea market
                    last week and was intrigued but not quite $175 worth of intrigued; I
                    expect the wife
                    would object to this large red behemoth sitting on “HER” kitchen counter,
                    but I have
                    thought about it several times since and may go back and make an offer.


                    Cheers, Phil Warner in Arkansas



                    ------------------------------------

                    Yahoo! Groups Links






                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  • P. Wilhelm
                    Thanks for all the great info. There s an Arcade #25 grinder being sold here locally that needs restoration/glass--I am thinking seriously about picking it
                    Message 9 of 17 , Mar 25 12:15 PM
                      Thanks for all the great info. There's an Arcade #25 grinder being sold here locally that needs restoration/glass--I am thinking seriously about picking it up. May do that this week.

                      In regards to the Mixmaster attachment, I believe there's a decent one AND an old A9 (sold as a set) on the e-bay right now, if anyone is looking-- Price is a bit steep for me, and we don't have the mixer.

                      Saw one "lap grinder" I liked, looked like 1950's era, and did notice that most of them can be adjusted by means of a wingnut (or similar) located on the bottom of the mechanism, if the drawer is removed.

                      I've heard you can clean the burrs by running rice through the mechanism--any truth to this?

                      Paul
                    • Dave K
                      here s a great big grinder that I was looking at over at the HFH ReStore in Addison, IL:
                      Message 10 of 17 , Mar 25 1:20 PM
                        here's a great big grinder that I was looking at over at the HFH ReStore in
                        Addison, IL:

                        Rosito-Bisani-Coffee-Grinder-and-Maker<http://www.diggerslist.com/sale/appliances/Rosito-Bisani-Coffee-Grinder-and-Maker/87487/>

                        Price says $250 but they are usually pretty open to haggling. It's a little
                        more than I can use! :)

                        My home grinder is a Capresso conical burr and it's worked great for 5
                        years. I also have manual no-name wooden box grinder that works great. You
                        can use the old food mills that clamp on to the counter. Need to play with
                        the blades to get the right set, tho.

                        dave k. (former lurker)


                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      • carol.vesperino
                        I have had to grind down the neck threads with a dremmel to make some glass hoppers fit the opening, and I use Mason jar rubbers to replace the old rubber
                        Message 11 of 17 , Mar 25 2:06 PM
                          I have had to grind down the neck threads with a dremmel to make some
                          glass hoppers fit the opening, and I use Mason jar rubbers to replace the old
                          rubber rings that were in Arcades. As long as it's for use and not a museum
                          piece, who cares?
                          Carol


                          In a message dated 3/25/2013 3:15:06 P.M. Eastern Daylight Time,
                          pawilh@... writes:

                          Thanks for all the great info. There's an Arcade #25 grinder being sold
                          here locally that needs restoration/glass--I am thinking seriously about
                          picking it up. May do that this week.

                          Saw one "lap grinder" I liked, looked like 1950's era, and did notice that
                          most of them can be adjusted by means of a wingnut (or similar) located on
                          the bottom of the mechanism, if the drawer is removed.

                          I've heard you can clean the burrs by running rice through the
                          mechanism--any truth to this?

                          Paul


                          ------------------------------------

                          Yahoo! Groups Links






                          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        • carol.vesperino
                          That s pretty big. Planning on opening a coffee shop with it? I d have no counter space for it here, all full of my finds and can t-live-withouts. Carol
                          Message 12 of 17 , Mar 25 4:35 PM
                            That's pretty big. Planning on opening a coffee shop with it? I'd have no
                            counter space for it here, all full of my finds and can't-live-withouts.
                            Carol V___PA.


                            In a message dated 3/25/2013 7:04:40 P.M. Eastern Daylight Time,
                            kast.iron@... writes:

                            Rosito-Bisani-Coffee-Grinder-and-Maker


                            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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