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Re: [vacpot] Vac Coffee vs French Press

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  • Larry Hollenberg
    I have a photo in the photo album of a Melita electric drip coffee maker. Its a rather interesting looking piece and is in perfect shape.. I ran across it at
    Message 1 of 16 , Mar 22, 2013
    • 0 Attachment
      I have a photo in the photo album of a Melita electric drip coffee maker. Its a rather interesting looking piece and is in perfect shape.. I ran across it at an antique mall and had no idea what it was.. It turned out that Ian responded that it was the first Melita automatic coffee drip type system.    I didn't use it much as I tried all kinds of other pots.. However the past bit I have gotten lazy about boiling water and using several pots to make drip manually or even the vac pots.. The old Melita has as you mentioned actually done a quite good job of producing a good brew and it does it very quickly.. I guess laziness is a symptom of older age.. 

      I did at some points also use the French Press type pots. The also make a reasonably rich brew to my taste. Something along the order perhaps of boiled coffee.  Something else I used to do with a simple sauce pan. The secret to them was to add the cold water portion (usually about a cup to half cup) depending on how much you were making. Then letting it rest over low heat before serving.  It would drop the grounds to the bottom and unless you really tilted the pot over it would serve clear coffee.  One bad feature as the press has is that to really have it stay at its best you need to pour the coffee off the grounds after its done. The grounds cause it to become bitter in a fairly short time. 

      Larry


      ________________________________
      From: Roland <rsburritt@...>
      To: vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Friday, March 22, 2013 2:46 PM
      Subject: RE: [vacpot] Vac Coffee vs French Press


       
      This is an interesting topic, seeing who prefers what and why.

      As far as flavor I prefer the pour-over Melitta method. This seems to
      produce a rich flavor without over-extraction. However, I like very hot
      coffee and even though I brew with 210-215 degree water, by the time the
      pour-over finishes brewing (I brew in a 2-cup batch) the brewed coffee in
      the decanter has cooled down to below where I like it so I end up having to
      zap it for a few seconds in the cup to get it hot enough again. With a vac
      pot, there is I feel a bit of compromise on flavor but the coffee comes out
      of the pot piping hot, which I like.

      I'm 50/50 on a Coffee Press. I used one for several years and it does
      produce a tasty brew, but you have to transfer it directly to another
      decanter to avoid any overextraction (even with the grounds already pushed
      down to the bottom). The Press is also the most complex to clean, which I
      don't enjoy. The simplest as far as clean up is the Melitta followed by the
      vac pot.

      One thing about the press is that you can start with the absolute cheapest
      generic store bought pre-ground, semi-stale coffee...and still end up with a
      half-decent brew.

      Roland

      -----Original Message-----
      From: vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com
      [mailto:vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of David Fiore
      Sent: Friday, March 22, 2013 12:36 PM
      To: vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: Re: [vacpot] Vac Coffee vs French Press

      I switch to vac pots for the following reasons:

      - I loved the flavor of my french press but...
      - the kids kept knocking it of the counter and breaking it so I kept
      having to buy new ones
      - the Sunbeam C30s were virtually indestructible
      - I love the coffee from my C30!

      A friend of mine loves the vac pot over the french press primarily because
      it keeps the coffee hot, whereas the french press did not.

      Cheers,
      -dbf

      On Fri, Mar 22, 2013 at 1:52 PM, Brian Helfrich <bhelfric@...>wrote:

      > **
      >
      >
      > For me the first two in this list have the biggest impact on the
      > coffee
      > flavor:
      >
      > Vac pots can keep the water in the 200 F +/- degree range while
      > brewing so you get a better bloom during the brew.
      >
      > French press also requires the use of a larger grind to the beans,
      > which means one doesn't extract as much of the flavor. I think it's
      > important to use a burr grinder to keep the powder down in the
      > grounds, but you don't need a grinder good enough to do espresso grind.
      >
      > As you mentioned vac pots can do a better job of filtering the brew,
      > and can be set up to keep the oils in the grinds with cloth or paper
      > fillers if desired, or not, using screens or Cory style filters.
      >
      > Brian
      >
      > your mileage may vary ;-)
      >
      > --------------------------------------------------
      > From: "opinicize" <opinicize@...>
      > Sent: Friday, March 22, 2013 1:17 PM
      > To: <vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com>
      > Subject: [vacpot] Vac Coffee vs French Press
      >
      >
      > > Hi Brian,
      > >
      > > Sorry to be obtuse, but what are the two reasons French Press is not
      > > as good? I cannot follow the thread properly to even pick out which
      > > one reason was cited.
      > >
      > > But ... I love the ease of French Press but switched to pour over
      > > (Melitta) because I didn't like the silt in the bottom of the mug,
      > > and
      > the
      > > occasional grounds floating in my drink. So, I assume one of the two
      > > reasons French Press is not liked is the one I just mentioned. It's
      > > not worth the trouble to have to strain your coffee before you drink it.
      > >
      > >
      > > Christine - Mpls
      > >
      > >
      >
      >
      >

      --

      ----------------------------------------------------------
      ----------

      David Fiore

      david@...

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

      ------------------------------------

      Yahoo! Groups Links




      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Roland
      Larry, isn t that called Cowboy Coffee where you use the saucepan? I have never tried it, nor have I been where someone did the coffee that way, but I seem
      Message 2 of 16 , Mar 22, 2013
      • 0 Attachment
        Larry, isn't that called "Cowboy Coffee" where you use the saucepan? I have never tried it, nor have I been where someone did the coffee that way, but I seem to recall someone saying once that you crack an egg into it to keep the grounds from spreading.



        Surprisingly, I have found that I also enjoy percolated coffee, but it has to be done just right, either on the stove or in a pot that does not overextract. So far, the only one I have found that makes pretty good coffee is the Farberware Superfast. I picked up a very old one NOS for a couple of dollars a few years ago and used it as my main pot for about a year. It made good coffee. One thing is that the coffee is also very hot like vacpot coffee. I also think the Pyrex glass percolator does a pretty good job, especially with flavored coffees (which are not suited for vacpot brewing).



        Roland



        From: vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com [mailto:vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Larry Hollenberg
        Sent: Friday, March 22, 2013 3:32 PM
        To: vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: Re: [vacpot] Vac Coffee vs French Press





        I have a photo in the photo album of a Melita electric drip coffee maker. Its a rather interesting looking piece and is in perfect shape.. I ran across it at an antique mall and had no idea what it was.. It turned out that Ian responded that it was the first Melita automatic coffee drip type system. I didn't use it much as I tried all kinds of other pots.. However the past bit I have gotten lazy about boiling water and using several pots to make drip manually or even the vac pots.. The old Melita has as you mentioned actually done a quite good job of producing a good brew and it does it very quickly.. I guess laziness is a symptom of older age..

        I did at some points also use the French Press type pots. The also make a reasonably rich brew to my taste. Something along the order perhaps of boiled coffee. Something else I used to do with a simple sauce pan. The secret to them was to add the cold water portion (usually about a cup to half cup) depending on how much you were making. Then letting it rest over low heat before serving. It would drop the grounds to the bottom and unless you really tilted the pot over it would serve clear coffee. One bad feature as the press has is that to really have it stay at its best you need to pour the coffee off the grounds after its done. The grounds cause it to become bitter in a fairly short time.

        Larry

        ________________________________
        From: Roland <rsburritt@... <mailto:rsburritt%40gmail.com> >
        To: vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com <mailto:vacuumcoffeepotcollector%40yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Friday, March 22, 2013 2:46 PM
        Subject: RE: [vacpot] Vac Coffee vs French Press



        This is an interesting topic, seeing who prefers what and why.

        As far as flavor I prefer the pour-over Melitta method. This seems to
        produce a rich flavor without over-extraction. However, I like very hot
        coffee and even though I brew with 210-215 degree water, by the time the
        pour-over finishes brewing (I brew in a 2-cup batch) the brewed coffee in
        the decanter has cooled down to below where I like it so I end up having to
        zap it for a few seconds in the cup to get it hot enough again. With a vac
        pot, there is I feel a bit of compromise on flavor but the coffee comes out
        of the pot piping hot, which I like.

        I'm 50/50 on a Coffee Press. I used one for several years and it does
        produce a tasty brew, but you have to transfer it directly to another
        decanter to avoid any overextraction (even with the grounds already pushed
        down to the bottom). The Press is also the most complex to clean, which I
        don't enjoy. The simplest as far as clean up is the Melitta followed by the
        vac pot.

        One thing about the press is that you can start with the absolute cheapest
        generic store bought pre-ground, semi-stale coffee...and still end up with a
        half-decent brew.

        Roland

        -----Original Message-----
        From: vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com <mailto:vacuumcoffeepotcollector%40yahoogroups.com>
        [mailto:vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com <mailto:vacuumcoffeepotcollector%40yahoogroups.com> ] On Behalf Of David Fiore
        Sent: Friday, March 22, 2013 12:36 PM
        To: vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com <mailto:vacuumcoffeepotcollector%40yahoogroups.com>
        Subject: Re: [vacpot] Vac Coffee vs French Press

        I switch to vac pots for the following reasons:

        - I loved the flavor of my french press but...
        - the kids kept knocking it of the counter and breaking it so I kept
        having to buy new ones
        - the Sunbeam C30s were virtually indestructible
        - I love the coffee from my C30!

        A friend of mine loves the vac pot over the french press primarily because
        it keeps the coffee hot, whereas the french press did not.

        Cheers,
        -dbf

        On Fri, Mar 22, 2013 at 1:52 PM, Brian Helfrich <bhelfric@... <mailto:bhelfric%40hotmail.com> >wrote:

        > **
        >
        >
        > For me the first two in this list have the biggest impact on the
        > coffee
        > flavor:
        >
        > Vac pots can keep the water in the 200 F +/- degree range while
        > brewing so you get a better bloom during the brew.
        >
        > French press also requires the use of a larger grind to the beans,
        > which means one doesn't extract as much of the flavor. I think it's
        > important to use a burr grinder to keep the powder down in the
        > grounds, but you don't need a grinder good enough to do espresso grind.
        >
        > As you mentioned vac pots can do a better job of filtering the brew,
        > and can be set up to keep the oils in the grinds with cloth or paper
        > fillers if desired, or not, using screens or Cory style filters.
        >
        > Brian
        >
        > your mileage may vary ;-)
        >
        > --------------------------------------------------
        > From: "opinicize" <opinicize@... <mailto:opinicize%40yahoo.com> >
        > Sent: Friday, March 22, 2013 1:17 PM
        > To: <vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com <mailto:vacuumcoffeepotcollector%40yahoogroups.com> >
        > Subject: [vacpot] Vac Coffee vs French Press
        >
        >
        > > Hi Brian,
        > >
        > > Sorry to be obtuse, but what are the two reasons French Press is not
        > > as good? I cannot follow the thread properly to even pick out which
        > > one reason was cited.
        > >
        > > But ... I love the ease of French Press but switched to pour over
        > > (Melitta) because I didn't like the silt in the bottom of the mug,
        > > and
        > the
        > > occasional grounds floating in my drink. So, I assume one of the two
        > > reasons French Press is not liked is the one I just mentioned. It's
        > > not worth the trouble to have to strain your coffee before you drink it.
        > >
        > >
        > > Christine - Mpls
        > >
        > >
        >
        >
        >

        --

        ----------------------------------------------------------
        ----------

        David Fiore

        david@... <mailto:david%40fiores.org>

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

        ------------------------------------

        Yahoo! Groups Links

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Larry Hollenberg
        Hi Roland, Nice to see you with us again.  Some people probably do call it Cowboy Coffee. I would suppose the reason being that its something that was easily
        Message 3 of 16 , Mar 23, 2013
        • 0 Attachment
          Hi Roland,

          Nice to see you with us again.  Some people probably do call it Cowboy Coffee. I would suppose the reason being that its something that was easily made without any special equipment.  There are numerous recipes in older cook books for how to successfully make boiled coffee.  Among them is the type where they added egg to the coffee.  Here is a recipe my old Meta Givens Modern Encyclopedia of Cooking book gives. 

          Old fashioned "Boiled Coffee"  Steeping Method


          Preheat pot by scalding with hot water. Measure 11/2 to 2 level tablespoons of regular or coarse grind coffee into the pot for each cup of water. (1/2 pint). To 5 or 6 tablespoons of coffee stir in about  1/2 tablespoon of beaten egg or egg whites or inner linings of egg shells. Pour on the measured amount of fresh boiling water. Stir over direct heat 1/2 minute.  Cover, turn off burner or remove from heat (if electric is used). Let stand to steep for 5 to 10 minutes depending on grind or strength desired. Pour coffee though a strainer if desired to serve. If not served at once remove and pour coffee though a strainer into a hot scaled pot. 

          There are other versions which are what I personally use.. You make it the same but  retaining about a fourth of the water and after the 1/2 minute brew you then pour the cold water into the pot.  (this causes the cold water to move the grounds to the bottom of the pan).  Serve as the same.  I keep it over a very low heat so it stays hot. 

          The egg shell variety had a bit of odd flavor from the egg to my taste. 

          Larry




          ________________________________
          From: Roland <rsburritt@...>
          To: vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Friday, March 22, 2013 11:40 PM
          Subject: RE: [vacpot] Vac Coffee vs French Press


           
          Larry, isn't that called "Cowboy Coffee" where you use the saucepan? I have never tried it, nor have I been where someone did the coffee that way, but I seem to recall someone saying once that you crack an egg into it to keep the grounds from spreading.

          Surprisingly, I have found that I also enjoy percolated coffee, but it has to be done just right, either on the stove or in a pot that does not overextract. So far, the only one I have found that makes pretty good coffee is the Farberware Superfast. I picked up a very old one NOS for a couple of dollars a few years ago and used it as my main pot for about a year. It made good coffee. One thing is that the coffee is also very hot like vacpot coffee. I also think the Pyrex glass percolator does a pretty good job, especially with flavored coffees (which are not suited for vacpot brewing).

          Roland

          From: vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com [mailto:vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Larry Hollenberg
          Sent: Friday, March 22, 2013 3:32 PM
          To: vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: Re: [vacpot] Vac Coffee vs French Press

          I have a photo in the photo album of a Melita electric drip coffee maker. Its a rather interesting looking piece and is in perfect shape.. I ran across it at an antique mall and had no idea what it was.. It turned out that Ian responded that it was the first Melita automatic coffee drip type system. I didn't use it much as I tried all kinds of other pots.. However the past bit I have gotten lazy about boiling water and using several pots to make drip manually or even the vac pots.. The old Melita has as you mentioned actually done a quite good job of producing a good brew and it does it very quickly.. I guess laziness is a symptom of older age..

          I did at some points also use the French Press type pots. The also make a reasonably rich brew to my taste. Something along the order perhaps of boiled coffee. Something else I used to do with a simple sauce pan. The secret to them was to add the cold water portion (usually about a cup to half cup) depending on how much you were making. Then letting it rest over low heat before serving. It would drop the grounds to the bottom and unless you really tilted the pot over it would serve clear coffee. One bad feature as the press has is that to really have it stay at its best you need to pour the coffee off the grounds after its done. The grounds cause it to become bitter in a fairly short time.

          Larry

          ________________________________
          From: Roland <rsburritt@... <mailto:rsburritt%40gmail.com> >
          To: vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com <mailto:vacuumcoffeepotcollector%40yahoogroups.com>
          Sent: Friday, March 22, 2013 2:46 PM
          Subject: RE: [vacpot] Vac Coffee vs French Press

          This is an interesting topic, seeing who prefers what and why.

          As far as flavor I prefer the pour-over Melitta method. This seems to
          produce a rich flavor without over-extraction. However, I like very hot
          coffee and even though I brew with 210-215 degree water, by the time the
          pour-over finishes brewing (I brew in a 2-cup batch) the brewed coffee in
          the decanter has cooled down to below where I like it so I end up having to
          zap it for a few seconds in the cup to get it hot enough again. With a vac
          pot, there is I feel a bit of compromise on flavor but the coffee comes out
          of the pot piping hot, which I like.

          I'm 50/50 on a Coffee Press. I used one for several years and it does
          produce a tasty brew, but you have to transfer it directly to another
          decanter to avoid any overextraction (even with the grounds already pushed
          down to the bottom). The Press is also the most complex to clean, which I
          don't enjoy. The simplest as far as clean up is the Melitta followed by the
          vac pot.

          One thing about the press is that you can start with the absolute cheapest
          generic store bought pre-ground, semi-stale coffee...and still end up with a
          half-decent brew.

          Roland

          -----Original Message-----
          From: vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com <mailto:vacuumcoffeepotcollector%40yahoogroups.com>
          [mailto:vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com <mailto:vacuumcoffeepotcollector%40yahoogroups.com> ] On Behalf Of David Fiore
          Sent: Friday, March 22, 2013 12:36 PM
          To: vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com <mailto:vacuumcoffeepotcollector%40yahoogroups.com>
          Subject: Re: [vacpot] Vac Coffee vs French Press

          I switch to vac pots for the following reasons:

          - I loved the flavor of my french press but...
          - the kids kept knocking it of the counter and breaking it so I kept
          having to buy new ones
          - the Sunbeam C30s were virtually indestructible
          - I love the coffee from my C30!

          A friend of mine loves the vac pot over the french press primarily because
          it keeps the coffee hot, whereas the french press did not.

          Cheers,
          -dbf

          On Fri, Mar 22, 2013 at 1:52 PM, Brian Helfrich <bhelfric@... <mailto:bhelfric%40hotmail.com> >wrote:

          > **
          >
          >
          > For me the first two in this list have the biggest impact on the
          > coffee
          > flavor:
          >
          > Vac pots can keep the water in the 200 F +/- degree range while
          > brewing so you get a better bloom during the brew.
          >
          > French press also requires the use of a larger grind to the beans,
          > which means one doesn't extract as much of the flavor. I think it's
          > important to use a burr grinder to keep the powder down in the
          > grounds, but you don't need a grinder good enough to do espresso grind.
          >
          > As you mentioned vac pots can do a better job of filtering the brew,
          > and can be set up to keep the oils in the grinds with cloth or paper
          > fillers if desired, or not, using screens or Cory style filters.
          >
          > Brian
          >
          > your mileage may vary ;-)
          >
          > --------------------------------------------------
          > From: "opinicize" <opinicize@... <mailto:opinicize%40yahoo.com> >
          > Sent: Friday, March 22, 2013 1:17 PM
          > To: <vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com <mailto:vacuumcoffeepotcollector%40yahoogroups.com> >
          > Subject: [vacpot] Vac Coffee vs French Press
          >
          >
          > > Hi Brian,
          > >
          > > Sorry to be obtuse, but what are the two reasons French Press is not
          > > as good? I cannot follow the thread properly to even pick out which
          > > one reason was cited.
          > >
          > > But ... I love the ease of French Press but switched to pour over
          > > (Melitta) because I didn't like the silt in the bottom of the mug,
          > > and
          > the
          > > occasional grounds floating in my drink. So, I assume one of the two
          > > reasons French Press is not liked is the one I just mentioned. It's
          > > not worth the trouble to have to strain your coffee before you drink it.
          > >
          > >
          > > Christine - Mpls
          > >
          > >
          >
          >
          >

          --

          ----------------------------------------------------------
          ----------

          David Fiore

          david@... <mailto:david%40fiores.org>

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

          ------------------------------------

          Yahoo! Groups Links

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Dave Bellware
          On Sat, Mar 23, 2013 at 7:56 AM, Larry Hollenberg wrote: There are numerous recipes in older cook books for how to successfully make
          Message 4 of 16 , Mar 23, 2013
          • 0 Attachment
            On Sat, Mar 23, 2013 at 7:56 AM, Larry Hollenberg
            <larryhollenb@...>wrote: There are numerous recipes in older
            cook books for how to
            successfully make boiled coffee. Among them is the type where they added
            egg to the coffee. Here is a recipe my old Meta Givens Modern Encyclopedia
            of Cooking book gives.
            >
            > Old fashioned "Boiled Coffee" Steeping Method
            >
            > There are other versions which are what I personally use.. You make it the
            > same but retaining about a fourth of the water and after the 1/2 minute
            > brew you then pour the cold water into the pot. (this causes the cold
            > water to move the grounds to the bottom of the pan). Serve as the same. I
            > keep it over a very low heat so it stays hot.
            >
            > The egg shell variety had a bit of odd flavor from the egg to my taste.
            >
            > Larry
            >
            Fascinating!
            Larry: When you say you retain about one fourth of the water, are you
            talking about actual cold water, or are you talking about water which is
            only 30 seconds off of boil?

            > ________________________________
            > From: Roland <rsburritt@...>
            > I also think the Pyrex glass percolator does a pretty good job, especially
            > with flavored coffees (which are not suited for vacpot brewing).
            >
            > Roland
            >
            Some might say that flavored coffees in and of themselves are not worth
            brewing by any method. Lol.

            >
            > From: vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com [mailto:
            > vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Larry Hollenberg
            > Sent: Friday, March 22, 2013 3:32 PM
            > To: vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com
            > Subject: Re: [vacpot] Vac Coffee vs French Press
            >
            > I have a photo in the photo album of a Melita electric drip coffee maker.
            > Its a rather interesting looking piece and is in perfect shape.. I ran
            > across it at an antique mall and had no idea what it was.. It turned out
            > that Ian responded that it was the first Melita automatic coffee drip type
            > system. I didn't use it much as I tried all kinds of other pots.. However
            > the past bit I have gotten lazy about boiling water and using several pots
            > to make drip manually or even the vac pots.. The old Melita has as you
            > mentioned actually done a quite good job of producing a good brew and it
            > does it very quickly.. I guess laziness is a symptom of older age..
            >
            > I did at some points also use the French Press type pots. The also make a
            > reasonably rich brew to my taste. Something along the order perhaps of
            > boiled coffee. Something else I used to do with a simple sauce pan. The
            > secret to them was to add the cold water portion (usually about a cup to
            > half cup) depending on how much you were making. Then letting it rest over
            > low heat before serving. It would drop the grounds to the bottom and unless
            > you really tilted the pot over it would serve clear coffee. One bad feature
            > as the press has is that to really have it stay at its best you need to
            > pour the coffee off the grounds after its done. The grounds cause it to
            > become bitter in a fairly short time.
            >
            > Larry
            >
            > ________________________________
            > From: Roland <rsburritt@... <mailto:rsburritt%40gmail.com> >
            > To: vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com <mailto:
            > vacuumcoffeepotcollector%40yahoogroups.com>
            > Sent: Friday, March 22, 2013 2:46 PM
            > Subject: RE: [vacpot] Vac Coffee vs French Press
            >
            > This is an interesting topic, seeing who prefers what and why.
            >
            > As far as flavor I prefer the pour-over Melitta method. This seems to
            > produce a rich flavor without over-extraction. However, I like very hot
            > coffee and even though I brew with 210-215 degree water....
            >
            215 degree water? You have to be about 2000 feet below sea level for water
            to be that hot.

            >
            >
            > One thing about the press is that you can start with the absolute cheapest
            > generic store bought pre-ground, semi-stale coffee...and still end up with
            > a
            > half-decent brew.
            >
            > Roland
            >
            Coffee is good, period, even when not optimal.

            >
            > -----Original Message-----
            > On Behalf Of David Fiore
            >
            > - the Sunbeam C30s were virtually indestructible
            > - I love the coffee from my C30!
            >
            Me 3!
            Dave Bellware


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Roland
            Thanks for the recipe, Larry. It sounds very interesting. Roland From: vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com
            Message 5 of 16 , Mar 23, 2013
            • 0 Attachment
              Thanks for the recipe, Larry. It sounds very interesting.



              Roland







              From: vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com [mailto:vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Larry Hollenberg
              Sent: Saturday, March 23, 2013 5:57 AM
              To: vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com
              Subject: Re: [vacpot] Boiled Coffee





              Hi Roland,

              Nice to see you with us again. Some people probably do call it Cowboy Coffee. I would suppose the reason being that its something that was easily made without any special equipment. There are numerous recipes in older cook books for how to successfully make boiled coffee. Among them is the type where they added egg to the coffee. Here is a recipe my old Meta Givens Modern Encyclopedia of Cooking book gives.

              Old fashioned "Boiled Coffee" Steeping Method

              Preheat pot by scalding with hot water. Measure 11/2 to 2 level tablespoons of regular or coarse grind coffee into the pot for each cup of water. (1/2 pint). To 5 or 6 tablespoons of coffee stir in about 1/2 tablespoon of beaten egg or egg whites or inner linings of egg shells. Pour on the measured amount of fresh boiling water. Stir over direct heat 1/2 minute. Cover, turn off burner or remove from heat (if electric is used). Let stand to steep for 5 to 10 minutes depending on grind or strength desired. Pour coffee though a strainer if desired to serve. If not served at once remove and pour coffee though a strainer into a hot scaled pot.

              There are other versions which are what I personally use.. You make it the same but retaining about a fourth of the water and after the 1/2 minute brew you then pour the cold water into the pot. (this causes the cold water to move the grounds to the bottom of the pan). Serve as the same. I keep it over a very low heat so it stays hot.

              The egg shell variety had a bit of odd flavor from the egg to my taste.

              Larry

              ________________________________
              From: Roland <rsburritt@... <mailto:rsburritt%40gmail.com> >
              To: vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com <mailto:vacuumcoffeepotcollector%40yahoogroups.com>
              Sent: Friday, March 22, 2013 11:40 PM
              Subject: RE: [vacpot] Vac Coffee vs French Press



              Larry, isn't that called "Cowboy Coffee" where you use the saucepan? I have never tried it, nor have I been where someone did the coffee that way, but I seem to recall someone saying once that you crack an egg into it to keep the grounds from spreading.

              Surprisingly, I have found that I also enjoy percolated coffee, but it has to be done just right, either on the stove or in a pot that does not overextract. So far, the only one I have found that makes pretty good coffee is the Farberware Superfast. I picked up a very old one NOS for a couple of dollars a few years ago and used it as my main pot for about a year. It made good coffee. One thing is that the coffee is also very hot like vacpot coffee. I also think the Pyrex glass percolator does a pretty good job, especially with flavored coffees (which are not suited for vacpot brewing).

              Roland

              From: vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com <mailto:vacuumcoffeepotcollector%40yahoogroups.com> [mailto:vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com <mailto:vacuumcoffeepotcollector%40yahoogroups.com> ] On Behalf Of Larry Hollenberg
              Sent: Friday, March 22, 2013 3:32 PM
              To: vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com <mailto:vacuumcoffeepotcollector%40yahoogroups.com>
              Subject: Re: [vacpot] Vac Coffee vs French Press

              I have a photo in the photo album of a Melita electric drip coffee maker. Its a rather interesting looking piece and is in perfect shape.. I ran across it at an antique mall and had no idea what it was.. It turned out that Ian responded that it was the first Melita automatic coffee drip type system. I didn't use it much as I tried all kinds of other pots.. However the past bit I have gotten lazy about boiling water and using several pots to make drip manually or even the vac pots.. The old Melita has as you mentioned actually done a quite good job of producing a good brew and it does it very quickly.. I guess laziness is a symptom of older age..

              I did at some points also use the French Press type pots. The also make a reasonably rich brew to my taste. Something along the order perhaps of boiled coffee. Something else I used to do with a simple sauce pan. The secret to them was to add the cold water portion (usually about a cup to half cup) depending on how much you were making. Then letting it rest over low heat before serving. It would drop the grounds to the bottom and unless you really tilted the pot over it would serve clear coffee. One bad feature as the press has is that to really have it stay at its best you need to pour the coffee off the grounds after its done. The grounds cause it to become bitter in a fairly short time.

              Larry

              ________________________________
              From: Roland <rsburritt@... <mailto:rsburritt%40gmail.com> <mailto:rsburritt%40gmail.com> >
              To: vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com <mailto:vacuumcoffeepotcollector%40yahoogroups.com> <mailto:vacuumcoffeepotcollector%40yahoogroups.com>
              Sent: Friday, March 22, 2013 2:46 PM
              Subject: RE: [vacpot] Vac Coffee vs French Press

              This is an interesting topic, seeing who prefers what and why.

              As far as flavor I prefer the pour-over Melitta method. This seems to
              produce a rich flavor without over-extraction. However, I like very hot
              coffee and even though I brew with 210-215 degree water, by the time the
              pour-over finishes brewing (I brew in a 2-cup batch) the brewed coffee in
              the decanter has cooled down to below where I like it so I end up having to
              zap it for a few seconds in the cup to get it hot enough again. With a vac
              pot, there is I feel a bit of compromise on flavor but the coffee comes out
              of the pot piping hot, which I like.

              I'm 50/50 on a Coffee Press. I used one for several years and it does
              produce a tasty brew, but you have to transfer it directly to another
              decanter to avoid any overextraction (even with the grounds already pushed
              down to the bottom). The Press is also the most complex to clean, which I
              don't enjoy. The simplest as far as clean up is the Melitta followed by the
              vac pot.

              One thing about the press is that you can start with the absolute cheapest
              generic store bought pre-ground, semi-stale coffee...and still end up with a
              half-decent brew.

              Roland

              -----Original Message-----
              From: vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com <mailto:vacuumcoffeepotcollector%40yahoogroups.com> <mailto:vacuumcoffeepotcollector%40yahoogroups.com>
              [mailto:vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com <mailto:vacuumcoffeepotcollector%40yahoogroups.com> <mailto:vacuumcoffeepotcollector%40yahoogroups.com> ] On Behalf Of David Fiore
              Sent: Friday, March 22, 2013 12:36 PM
              To: vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com <mailto:vacuumcoffeepotcollector%40yahoogroups.com> <mailto:vacuumcoffeepotcollector%40yahoogroups.com>
              Subject: Re: [vacpot] Vac Coffee vs French Press

              I switch to vac pots for the following reasons:

              - I loved the flavor of my french press but...
              - the kids kept knocking it of the counter and breaking it so I kept
              having to buy new ones
              - the Sunbeam C30s were virtually indestructible
              - I love the coffee from my C30!

              A friend of mine loves the vac pot over the french press primarily because
              it keeps the coffee hot, whereas the french press did not.

              Cheers,
              -dbf

              On Fri, Mar 22, 2013 at 1:52 PM, Brian Helfrich <bhelfric@... <mailto:bhelfric%40hotmail.com> <mailto:bhelfric%40hotmail.com> >wrote:

              > **
              >
              >
              > For me the first two in this list have the biggest impact on the
              > coffee
              > flavor:
              >
              > Vac pots can keep the water in the 200 F +/- degree range while
              > brewing so you get a better bloom during the brew.
              >
              > French press also requires the use of a larger grind to the beans,
              > which means one doesn't extract as much of the flavor. I think it's
              > important to use a burr grinder to keep the powder down in the
              > grounds, but you don't need a grinder good enough to do espresso grind.
              >
              > As you mentioned vac pots can do a better job of filtering the brew,
              > and can be set up to keep the oils in the grinds with cloth or paper
              > fillers if desired, or not, using screens or Cory style filters.
              >
              > Brian
              >
              > your mileage may vary ;-)
              >
              > --------------------------------------------------
              > From: "opinicize" <opinicize@... <mailto:opinicize%40yahoo.com> <mailto:opinicize%40yahoo.com> >
              > Sent: Friday, March 22, 2013 1:17 PM
              > To: <vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com <mailto:vacuumcoffeepotcollector%40yahoogroups.com> <mailto:vacuumcoffeepotcollector%40yahoogroups.com> >
              > Subject: [vacpot] Vac Coffee vs French Press
              >
              >
              > > Hi Brian,
              > >
              > > Sorry to be obtuse, but what are the two reasons French Press is not
              > > as good? I cannot follow the thread properly to even pick out which
              > > one reason was cited.
              > >
              > > But ... I love the ease of French Press but switched to pour over
              > > (Melitta) because I didn't like the silt in the bottom of the mug,
              > > and
              > the
              > > occasional grounds floating in my drink. So, I assume one of the two
              > > reasons French Press is not liked is the one I just mentioned. It's
              > > not worth the trouble to have to strain your coffee before you drink it.
              > >
              > >
              > > Christine - Mpls
              > >
              > >
              >
              >
              >

              --

              ----------------------------------------------------------
              ----------

              David Fiore

              david@... <mailto:david%40fiores.org> <mailto:david%40fiores.org>

              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

              ------------------------------------

              Yahoo! Groups Links

              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Larry Hollenberg
              Dave, Say you were using four cups of water.. You simply save back some, maybe a half cup to a cup and when the heated water comes to that boil for 30 seconds
              Message 6 of 16 , Mar 23, 2013
              • 0 Attachment
                Dave,

                Say you were using four cups of water.. You simply save back some, maybe a half cup to a cup and when the heated water comes to that boil for 30 seconds or so, you then pour in the remaining cold and I place it over a very low heat (enough to keep it  just drinkable), and let it steep for 6 minutes or so. Some do it less, or others longer depending on how strong you want it and how the grounds react to the water.. The recipe I quoted mentioned using a coarse grind.. I have used standard grinds like you get in packaged coffee with decent results as well, but you don't want to use the almost powered like grind that is becoming more common. 

                It might take a few tries but if its done right with a coffee that works well with the procedure it can be a very smooth and rich tasting coffee. In fact I have often contended that the vacuum pot is really in most ways mimicking the old boiled method only doing it so that the grounds are automatically separated from the coffee. \

                If I didn't make it clear the grounds are put in the water and then brought to a boil for the short period, then turned low after the water addition in the method where the cold is added to settle the grounds.

                Larry



                ________________________________
                From: Dave Bellware <bigbells@...>
                To: vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com
                Sent: Saturday, March 23, 2013 11:54 AM
                Subject: Re: [vacpot] Boiled Coffee


                 
                On Sat, Mar 23, 2013 at 7:56 AM, Larry Hollenberg
                <larryhollenb@...>wrote: There are numerous recipes in older
                cook books for how to
                successfully make boiled coffee. Among them is the type where they added
                egg to the coffee. Here is a recipe my old Meta Givens Modern Encyclopedia
                of Cooking book gives.
                >
                > Old fashioned "Boiled Coffee" Steeping Method
                >
                > There are other versions which are what I personally use.. You make it the
                > same but retaining about a fourth of the water and after the 1/2 minute
                > brew you then pour the cold water into the pot. (this causes the cold
                > water to move the grounds to the bottom of the pan). Serve as the same. I
                > keep it over a very low heat so it stays hot.
                >
                > The egg shell variety had a bit of odd flavor from the egg to my taste.
                >
                > Larry
                >
                Fascinating!
                Larry: When you say you retain about one fourth of the water, are you
                talking about actual cold water, or are you talking about water which is
                only 30 seconds off of boil?

                > ________________________________
                > From: Roland <rsburritt@...>
                > I also think the Pyrex glass percolator does a pretty good job, especially
                > with flavored coffees (which are not suited for vacpot brewing).
                >
                > Roland
                >
                Some might say that flavored coffees in and of themselves are not worth
                brewing by any method. Lol.

                >
                > From: vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com [mailto:
                > vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Larry Hollenberg
                > Sent: Friday, March 22, 2013 3:32 PM
                > To: vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com
                > Subject: Re: [vacpot] Vac Coffee vs French Press
                >
                > I have a photo in the photo album of a Melita electric drip coffee maker.
                > Its a rather interesting looking piece and is in perfect shape.. I ran
                > across it at an antique mall and had no idea what it was.. It turned out
                > that Ian responded that it was the first Melita automatic coffee drip type
                > system. I didn't use it much as I tried all kinds of other pots.. However
                > the past bit I have gotten lazy about boiling water and using several pots
                > to make drip manually or even the vac pots.. The old Melita has as you
                > mentioned actually done a quite good job of producing a good brew and it
                > does it very quickly.. I guess laziness is a symptom of older age..
                >
                > I did at some points also use the French Press type pots. The also make a
                > reasonably rich brew to my taste. Something along the order perhaps of
                > boiled coffee. Something else I used to do with a simple sauce pan. The
                > secret to them was to add the cold water portion (usually about a cup to
                > half cup) depending on how much you were making. Then letting it rest over
                > low heat before serving. It would drop the grounds to the bottom and unless
                > you really tilted the pot over it would serve clear coffee. One bad feature
                > as the press has is that to really have it stay at its best you need to
                > pour the coffee off the grounds after its done. The grounds cause it to
                > become bitter in a fairly short time.
                >
                > Larry
                >
                > ________________________________
                > From: Roland <rsburritt@... <mailto:rsburritt%40gmail.com> >
                > To: vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com <mailto:
                > vacuumcoffeepotcollector%40yahoogroups.com>
                > Sent: Friday, March 22, 2013 2:46 PM
                > Subject: RE: [vacpot] Vac Coffee vs French Press
                >
                > This is an interesting topic, seeing who prefers what and why.
                >
                > As far as flavor I prefer the pour-over Melitta method. This seems to
                > produce a rich flavor without over-extraction. However, I like very hot
                > coffee and even though I brew with 210-215 degree water....
                >
                215 degree water? You have to be about 2000 feet below sea level for water
                to be that hot.

                >
                >
                > One thing about the press is that you can start with the absolute cheapest
                > generic store bought pre-ground, semi-stale coffee...and still end up with
                > a
                > half-decent brew.
                >
                > Roland
                >
                Coffee is good, period, even when not optimal.

                >
                > -----Original Message-----
                > On Behalf Of David Fiore
                >
                > - the Sunbeam C30s were virtually indestructible
                > - I love the coffee from my C30!
                >
                Me 3!
                Dave Bellware

                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • Larry Hollenberg
                Roland, Dave, I see that in reading the recipe I gave she mentions pouring the boiling water over the grounds rather than adding them from the start of the
                Message 7 of 16 , Mar 23, 2013
                • 0 Attachment
                  Roland, Dave,

                  I see that in reading the recipe I gave she mentions pouring the boiling water over the grounds rather than adding them from the start of the heating process.  I have done it several ways and books vary as well.  Some times you can simply dump your grounds into a pot of the water boiling on the stove, stir and add the cold water after a few seconds.. some books said to start with cold water with the grounds in it an when it comes to the boil then you brew the allotted time and add the cold water.. its fun to try different things and see what happens.. It actually proves that as in the Cowboy reference that a fancy coffee maker is not the only way to make coffee and not always the best. 

                  Larry


                  ________________________________
                  From: Roland <rsburritt@...>
                  To: vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com
                  Sent: Saturday, March 23, 2013 12:09 PM
                  Subject: RE: [vacpot] Boiled Coffee


                   
                  Thanks for the recipe, Larry. It sounds very interesting.

                  Roland

                  From: vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com [mailto:vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Larry Hollenberg
                  Sent: Saturday, March 23, 2013 5:57 AM
                  To: vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com
                  Subject: Re: [vacpot] Boiled Coffee

                  Hi Roland,

                  Nice to see you with us again. Some people probably do call it Cowboy Coffee. I would suppose the reason being that its something that was easily made without any special equipment. There are numerous recipes in older cook books for how to successfully make boiled coffee. Among them is the type where they added egg to the coffee. Here is a recipe my old Meta Givens Modern Encyclopedia of Cooking book gives.

                  Old fashioned "Boiled Coffee" Steeping Method

                  Preheat pot by scalding with hot water. Measure 11/2 to 2 level tablespoons of regular or coarse grind coffee into the pot for each cup of water. (1/2 pint). To 5 or 6 tablespoons of coffee stir in about 1/2 tablespoon of beaten egg or egg whites or inner linings of egg shells. Pour on the measured amount of fresh boiling water. Stir over direct heat 1/2 minute. Cover, turn off burner or remove from heat (if electric is used). Let stand to steep for 5 to 10 minutes depending on grind or strength desired. Pour coffee though a strainer if desired to serve. If not served at once remove and pour coffee though a strainer into a hot scaled pot.

                  There are other versions which are what I personally use.. You make it the same but retaining about a fourth of the water and after the 1/2 minute brew you then pour the cold water into the pot. (this causes the cold water to move the grounds to the bottom of the pan). Serve as the same. I keep it over a very low heat so it stays hot.

                  The egg shell variety had a bit of odd flavor from the egg to my taste.

                  Larry

                  ________________________________
                  From: Roland <rsburritt@... <mailto:rsburritt%40gmail.com> >
                  To: vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com <mailto:vacuumcoffeepotcollector%40yahoogroups.com>
                  Sent: Friday, March 22, 2013 11:40 PM
                  Subject: RE: [vacpot] Vac Coffee vs French Press

                  Larry, isn't that called "Cowboy Coffee" where you use the saucepan? I have never tried it, nor have I been where someone did the coffee that way, but I seem to recall someone saying once that you crack an egg into it to keep the grounds from spreading.

                  Surprisingly, I have found that I also enjoy percolated coffee, but it has to be done just right, either on the stove or in a pot that does not overextract. So far, the only one I have found that makes pretty good coffee is the Farberware Superfast. I picked up a very old one NOS for a couple of dollars a few years ago and used it as my main pot for about a year. It made good coffee. One thing is that the coffee is also very hot like vacpot coffee. I also think the Pyrex glass percolator does a pretty good job, especially with flavored coffees (which are not suited for vacpot brewing).

                  Roland

                  From: vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com <mailto:vacuumcoffeepotcollector%40yahoogroups.com> [mailto:vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com <mailto:vacuumcoffeepotcollector%40yahoogroups.com> ] On Behalf Of Larry Hollenberg
                  Sent: Friday, March 22, 2013 3:32 PM
                  To: vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com <mailto:vacuumcoffeepotcollector%40yahoogroups.com>
                  Subject: Re: [vacpot] Vac Coffee vs French Press

                  I have a photo in the photo album of a Melita electric drip coffee maker. Its a rather interesting looking piece and is in perfect shape.. I ran across it at an antique mall and had no idea what it was.. It turned out that Ian responded that it was the first Melita automatic coffee drip type system. I didn't use it much as I tried all kinds of other pots.. However the past bit I have gotten lazy about boiling water and using several pots to make drip manually or even the vac pots.. The old Melita has as you mentioned actually done a quite good job of producing a good brew and it does it very quickly.. I guess laziness is a symptom of older age..

                  I did at some points also use the French Press type pots. The also make a reasonably rich brew to my taste. Something along the order perhaps of boiled coffee. Something else I used to do with a simple sauce pan. The secret to them was to add the cold water portion (usually about a cup to half cup) depending on how much you were making. Then letting it rest over low heat before serving. It would drop the grounds to the bottom and unless you really tilted the pot over it would serve clear coffee. One bad feature as the press has is that to really have it stay at its best you need to pour the coffee off the grounds after its done. The grounds cause it to become bitter in a fairly short time.

                  Larry

                  ________________________________
                  From: Roland <rsburritt@... <mailto:rsburritt%40gmail.com> <mailto:rsburritt%40gmail.com> >
                  To: vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com <mailto:vacuumcoffeepotcollector%40yahoogroups.com> <mailto:vacuumcoffeepotcollector%40yahoogroups.com>
                  Sent: Friday, March 22, 2013 2:46 PM
                  Subject: RE: [vacpot] Vac Coffee vs French Press

                  This is an interesting topic, seeing who prefers what and why.

                  As far as flavor I prefer the pour-over Melitta method. This seems to
                  produce a rich flavor without over-extraction. However, I like very hot
                  coffee and even though I brew with 210-215 degree water, by the time the
                  pour-over finishes brewing (I brew in a 2-cup batch) the brewed coffee in
                  the decanter has cooled down to below where I like it so I end up having to
                  zap it for a few seconds in the cup to get it hot enough again. With a vac
                  pot, there is I feel a bit of compromise on flavor but the coffee comes out
                  of the pot piping hot, which I like.

                  I'm 50/50 on a Coffee Press. I used one for several years and it does
                  produce a tasty brew, but you have to transfer it directly to another
                  decanter to avoid any overextraction (even with the grounds already pushed
                  down to the bottom). The Press is also the most complex to clean, which I
                  don't enjoy. The simplest as far as clean up is the Melitta followed by the
                  vac pot.

                  One thing about the press is that you can start with the absolute cheapest
                  generic store bought pre-ground, semi-stale coffee...and still end up with a
                  half-decent brew.

                  Roland

                  -----Original Message-----
                  From: vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com <mailto:vacuumcoffeepotcollector%40yahoogroups.com> <mailto:vacuumcoffeepotcollector%40yahoogroups.com>
                  [mailto:vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com <mailto:vacuumcoffeepotcollector%40yahoogroups.com> <mailto:vacuumcoffeepotcollector%40yahoogroups.com> ] On Behalf Of David Fiore
                  Sent: Friday, March 22, 2013 12:36 PM
                  To: vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com <mailto:vacuumcoffeepotcollector%40yahoogroups.com> <mailto:vacuumcoffeepotcollector%40yahoogroups.com>
                  Subject: Re: [vacpot] Vac Coffee vs French Press

                  I switch to vac pots for the following reasons:

                  - I loved the flavor of my french press but...
                  - the kids kept knocking it of the counter and breaking it so I kept
                  having to buy new ones
                  - the Sunbeam C30s were virtually indestructible
                  - I love the coffee from my C30!

                  A friend of mine loves the vac pot over the french press primarily because
                  it keeps the coffee hot, whereas the french press did not.

                  Cheers,
                  -dbf

                  On Fri, Mar 22, 2013 at 1:52 PM, Brian Helfrich <bhelfric@... <mailto:bhelfric%40hotmail.com> <mailto:bhelfric%40hotmail.com> >wrote:

                  > **
                  >
                  >
                  > For me the first two in this list have the biggest impact on the
                  > coffee
                  > flavor:
                  >
                  > Vac pots can keep the water in the 200 F +/- degree range while
                  > brewing so you get a better bloom during the brew.
                  >
                  > French press also requires the use of a larger grind to the beans,
                  > which means one doesn't extract as much of the flavor. I think it's
                  > important to use a burr grinder to keep the powder down in the
                  > grounds, but you don't need a grinder good enough to do espresso grind.
                  >
                  > As you mentioned vac pots can do a better job of filtering the brew,
                  > and can be set up to keep the oils in the grinds with cloth or paper
                  > fillers if desired, or not, using screens or Cory style filters.
                  >
                  > Brian
                  >
                  > your mileage may vary ;-)
                  >
                  > --------------------------------------------------
                  > From: "opinicize" <opinicize@... <mailto:opinicize%40yahoo.com> <mailto:opinicize%40yahoo.com> >
                  > Sent: Friday, March 22, 2013 1:17 PM
                  > To: <vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com <mailto:vacuumcoffeepotcollector%40yahoogroups.com> <mailto:vacuumcoffeepotcollector%40yahoogroups.com> >
                  > Subject: [vacpot] Vac Coffee vs French Press
                  >
                  >
                  > > Hi Brian,
                  > >
                  > > Sorry to be obtuse, but what are the two reasons French Press is not
                  > > as good? I cannot follow the thread properly to even pick out which
                  > > one reason was cited.
                  > >
                  > > But ... I love the ease of French Press but switched to pour over
                  > > (Melitta) because I didn't like the silt in the bottom of the mug,
                  > > and
                  > the
                  > > occasional grounds floating in my drink. So, I assume one of the two
                  > > reasons French Press is not liked is the one I just mentioned. It's
                  > > not worth the trouble to have to strain your coffee before you drink it.
                  > >
                  > >
                  > > Christine - Mpls
                  > >
                  > >
                  >
                  >
                  >

                  --

                  ----------------------------------------------------------
                  ----------

                  David Fiore

                  david@... <mailto:david%40fiores.org> <mailto:david%40fiores.org>

                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

                  ------------------------------------

                  Yahoo! Groups Links

                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • Dave Bellware
                  Roger. Now I m clear on your procedure. Thanks, Larry. I might try it soon, with some beans that I roasted a month ago. Beans roasted 30 days ago are on the
                  Message 8 of 16 , Mar 23, 2013
                  • 0 Attachment
                    Roger. Now I'm clear on your procedure. Thanks, Larry. I might try it soon,
                    with some beans that I roasted a month ago. Beans roasted 30 days ago are
                    on the verge of becoming plant food, even though they're in canning jars
                    with the lids closed tight. I've become quite the coffee snob.
                    Dave B

                    On Sat, Mar 23, 2013 at 1:18 PM, Larry Hollenberg <larryhollenb@...>wrote:

                    > **
                    >
                    >
                    > Dave,
                    >
                    > Say you were using four cups of water.. You simply save back some, maybe a
                    > half cup to a cup and when the heated water comes to that boil for 30
                    > seconds or so, you then pour in the remaining cold and I place it over a
                    > very low heat (enough to keep it just drinkable), and let it steep for 6
                    > minutes or so. Some do it less, or others longer depending on how strong
                    > you want it and how the grounds react to the water.. The recipe I quoted
                    > mentioned using a coarse grind.. I have used standard grinds like you get
                    > in packaged coffee with decent results as well, but you don't want to use
                    > the almost powered like grind that is becoming more common.
                    >
                    > It might take a few tries but if its done right with a coffee that works
                    > well with the procedure it can be a very smooth and rich tasting coffee. In
                    > fact I have often contended that the vacuum pot is really in most ways
                    > mimicking the old boiled method only doing it so that the grounds are
                    > automatically separated from the coffee. \
                    >
                    > If I didn't make it clear the grounds are put in the water and then
                    > brought to a boil for the short period, then turned low after the water
                    > addition in the method where the cold is added to settle the grounds.
                    >
                    > Larry
                    >


                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  • Larry Hollenberg
                    I haven t made this in some time so I decided to give it a try using my mix of eight o clock coffee using a mix of four cups of decaf beans to 1/2 cups regular
                    Message 9 of 16 , Mar 23, 2013
                    • 0 Attachment
                      I haven't made this in some time so I decided to give it a try using my mix of eight o'clock coffee using a mix of four cups of decaf beans to 1/2 cups regular columbian beans.  I ground them on the coarsest setting of my 
                      "cheap",  Mr. Coffee Grinder.  (never tried that setting before)..   from that I put two an a half tablespoons of grounds into an empty pot.  I brought to a boil two cups of boiling water, (measuring cups) and poured it over the grounds which I  put it back on the heat (cory coil coffee stove) for 30 seconds.  Here I may have goofed. It said on electric stoves to remove it from the heat source, which I only turned off.  I added the 1/2 cup of cold water an let it stand for 5 minutes. Then I poured it in a mug..  I noticed that it had a lot of grounds in it so I got out me small strainer and strained all the coffee back into a container and started over with the mug.. 


                      It is really quite good.  I would say its what most people would want from a successful brew in their vac pots. Totally smooth tasting an it has that sort of foam top I have seen described in some post when a coffee came out just right.  Actually it taste way better than the last time I did it using a standard coffee and grind. 

                      For my pots I used glass pyrex.. I use a six cup pyrex which fits perfectly on the cory stove.  Then for the coffee I used a Pyrex Tea Pot.  Thus no taint from a metal pot.   Nancy got me to using the Pyrex things, they are wonderful for coffee.  ( I don't like the perks though I find them near impossible to get to make a good cup that doesn't taste over cooked..).    

                      I think its the best cup of a mostly decaf coffee I have made as well.  I had to switch to mostly decaf due to health issues which I disliked, but after a while one finds some decent decaf coffee as well.  I do use the eight o'clock a lot but our local IGA went in with a local coffee shop and sells a Rock Solid Coffee which has a very good decaf breakfast blend I mix a bit of regular in with as well. 

                      Let me know if any of you try it an have good results..  I think the coarse grind is probably a must for this kind of brewing method. 

                      Larry


                      ________________________________
                      From: Dave Bellware <bigbells@...>
                      To: vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com
                      Sent: Saturday, March 23, 2013 1:18 PM
                      Subject: Re: [vacpot] Boiled Coffee


                       
                      Roger. Now I'm clear on your procedure. Thanks, Larry. I might try it soon,
                      with some beans that I roasted a month ago. Beans roasted 30 days ago are
                      on the verge of becoming plant food, even though they're in canning jars
                      with the lids closed tight. I've become quite the coffee snob.
                      Dave B

                      On Sat, Mar 23, 2013 at 1:18 PM, Larry Hollenberg <larryhollenb@...>wrote:

                      > **
                      >
                      >
                      > Dave,
                      >
                      > Say you were using four cups of water.. You simply save back some, maybe a
                      > half cup to a cup and when the heated water comes to that boil for 30
                      > seconds or so, you then pour in the remaining cold and I place it over a
                      > very low heat (enough to keep it just drinkable), and let it steep for 6
                      > minutes or so. Some do it less, or others longer depending on how strong
                      > you want it and how the grounds react to the water.. The recipe I quoted
                      > mentioned using a coarse grind.. I have used standard grinds like you get
                      > in packaged coffee with decent results as well, but you don't want to use
                      > the almost powered like grind that is becoming more common.
                      >
                      > It might take a few tries but if its done right with a coffee that works
                      > well with the procedure it can be a very smooth and rich tasting coffee. In
                      > fact I have often contended that the vacuum pot is really in most ways
                      > mimicking the old boiled method only doing it so that the grounds are
                      > automatically separated from the coffee. \
                      >
                      > If I didn't make it clear the grounds are put in the water and then
                      > brought to a boil for the short period, then turned low after the water
                      > addition in the method where the cold is added to settle the grounds.
                      >
                      > Larry
                      >

                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    • Larry Hollenberg
                      Hi all, As things will go today after my very tasty boiled coffee I decided to make some this afternoon.. I did it almost the same way. I did use a bit more
                      Message 10 of 16 , Mar 24, 2013
                      • 0 Attachment
                        Hi all,

                        As things will go today after my very tasty boiled coffee I decided to make some this afternoon.. I did it almost the same way. I did use a bit more water and perhaps then not quite enough grounds, or the ground beans which I had to mix a new batch of for the grinder might be slightly different. What ever I followed the suggested method of removing the coffee from the heat after the short boil period.  I left it on a trivet.. It poured with hardly any sediment at all down to the very bottom where the grounds sat mostly undisturbed.  So removing from the heat kept them from agitating a bit no doubt leaving them to settle as I recalled was the often the result. But this time the coffee lacks the extra smooth taste and I don't see the foam effect on the top of the brew before I poured it off the grounds.. I suspect that by leaving it on the off burner and it agitating for awhile it developed a different way which may have accounted for how good it was
                        yesterday..   So as I suggested yesterday, some experimenting may be on order to figure out just what it takes to make it come out right. 

                        I just know that if its brewed just right, you won't be disappointed, but if it has a lackluster effect something about it hasn't gone just right. 

                        Larry


                        ________________________________
                        From: Larry Hollenberg <larryhollenb@...>
                        To: "vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com" <vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com>
                        Sent: Saturday, March 23, 2013 6:56 AM
                        Subject: Re: [vacpot] Boiled Coffee


                         
                        Hi Roland,

                        Nice to see you with us again.  Some people probably do call it Cowboy Coffee. I would suppose the reason being that its something that was easily made without any special equipment.  There are numerous recipes in older cook books for how to successfully make boiled coffee.  Among them is the type where they added egg to the coffee.  Here is a recipe my old Meta Givens Modern Encyclopedia of Cooking book gives. 

                        Old fashioned "Boiled Coffee"  Steeping Method

                        Preheat pot by scalding with hot water. Measure 11/2 to 2 level tablespoons of regular or coarse grind coffee into the pot for each cup of water. (1/2 pint). To 5 or 6 tablespoons of coffee stir in about  1/2 tablespoon of beaten egg or egg whites or inner linings of egg shells. Pour on the measured amount of fresh boiling water. Stir over direct heat 1/2 minute.  Cover, turn off burner or remove from heat (if electric is used). Let stand to steep for 5 to 10 minutes depending on grind or strength desired. Pour coffee though a strainer if desired to serve. If not served at once remove and pour coffee though a strainer into a hot scaled pot. 

                        There are other versions which are what I personally use.. You make it the same but  retaining about a fourth of the water and after the 1/2 minute brew you then pour the cold water into the pot.  (this causes the cold water to move the grounds to the bottom of the pan).  Serve as the same.  I keep it over a very low heat so it stays hot. 

                        The egg shell variety had a bit of odd flavor from the egg to my taste. 

                        Larry

                        ________________________________
                        From: Roland <rsburritt@...>
                        To: vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com
                        Sent: Friday, March 22, 2013 11:40 PM
                        Subject: RE: [vacpot] Vac Coffee vs French Press


                         
                        Larry, isn't that called "Cowboy Coffee" where you use the saucepan? I have never tried it, nor have I been where someone did the coffee that way, but I seem to recall someone saying once that you crack an egg into it to keep the grounds from spreading.

                        Surprisingly, I have found that I also enjoy percolated coffee, but it has to be done just right, either on the stove or in a pot that does not overextract. So far, the only one I have found that makes pretty good coffee is the Farberware Superfast. I picked up a very old one NOS for a couple of dollars a few years ago and used it as my main pot for about a year. It made good coffee. One thing is that the coffee is also very hot like vacpot coffee. I also think the Pyrex glass percolator does a pretty good job, especially with flavored coffees (which are not suited for vacpot brewing).

                        Roland

                        From: vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com [mailto:vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Larry Hollenberg
                        Sent: Friday, March 22, 2013 3:32 PM
                        To: vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com
                        Subject: Re: [vacpot] Vac Coffee vs French Press

                        I have a photo in the photo album of a Melita electric drip coffee maker. Its a rather interesting looking piece and is in perfect shape.. I ran across it at an antique mall and had no idea what it was.. It turned out that Ian responded that it was the first Melita automatic coffee drip type system. I didn't use it much as I tried all kinds of other pots.. However the past bit I have gotten lazy about boiling water and using several pots to make drip manually or even the vac pots.. The old Melita has as you mentioned actually done a quite good job of producing a good brew and it does it very quickly.. I guess laziness is a symptom of older age..

                        I did at some points also use the French Press type pots. The also make a reasonably rich brew to my taste. Something along the order perhaps of boiled coffee. Something else I used to do with a simple sauce pan. The secret to them was to add the cold water portion (usually about a cup to half cup) depending on how much you were making. Then letting it rest over low heat before serving. It would drop the grounds to the bottom and unless you really tilted the pot over it would serve clear coffee. One bad feature as the press has is that to really have it stay at its best you need to pour the coffee off the grounds after its done. The grounds cause it to become bitter in a fairly short time.

                        Larry

                        ________________________________
                        From: Roland <rsburritt@... <mailto:rsburritt%40gmail.com> >
                        To: vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com <mailto:vacuumcoffeepotcollector%40yahoogroups.com>
                        Sent: Friday, March 22, 2013 2:46 PM
                        Subject: RE: [vacpot] Vac Coffee vs French Press

                        This is an interesting topic, seeing who prefers what and why.

                        As far as flavor I prefer the pour-over Melitta method. This seems to
                        produce a rich flavor without over-extraction. However, I like very hot
                        coffee and even though I brew with 210-215 degree water, by the time the
                        pour-over finishes brewing (I brew in a 2-cup batch) the brewed coffee in
                        the decanter has cooled down to below where I like it so I end up having to
                        zap it for a few seconds in the cup to get it hot enough again. With a vac
                        pot, there is I feel a bit of compromise on flavor but the coffee comes out
                        of the pot piping hot, which I like.

                        I'm 50/50 on a Coffee Press. I used one for several years and it does
                        produce a tasty brew, but you have to transfer it directly to another
                        decanter to avoid any overextraction (even with the grounds already pushed
                        down to the bottom). The Press is also the most complex to clean, which I
                        don't enjoy. The simplest as far as clean up is the Melitta followed by the
                        vac pot.

                        One thing about the press is that you can start with the absolute cheapest
                        generic store bought pre-ground, semi-stale coffee...and still end up with a
                        half-decent brew.

                        Roland

                        -----Original Message-----
                        From: vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com <mailto:vacuumcoffeepotcollector%40yahoogroups.com>
                        [mailto:vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com <mailto:vacuumcoffeepotcollector%40yahoogroups.com> ] On Behalf Of David Fiore
                        Sent: Friday, March 22, 2013 12:36 PM
                        To: vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com <mailto:vacuumcoffeepotcollector%40yahoogroups.com>
                        Subject: Re: [vacpot] Vac Coffee vs French Press

                        I switch to vac pots for the following reasons:

                        - I loved the flavor of my french press but...
                        - the kids kept knocking it of the counter and breaking it so I kept
                        having to buy new ones
                        - the Sunbeam C30s were virtually indestructible
                        - I love the coffee from my C30!

                        A friend of mine loves the vac pot over the french press primarily because
                        it keeps the coffee hot, whereas the french press did not.

                        Cheers,
                        -dbf

                        On Fri, Mar 22, 2013 at 1:52 PM, Brian Helfrich <bhelfric@... <mailto:bhelfric%40hotmail.com> >wrote:

                        > **
                        >
                        >
                        > For me the first two in this list have the biggest impact on the
                        > coffee
                        > flavor:
                        >
                        > Vac pots can keep the water in the 200 F +/- degree range while
                        > brewing so you get a better bloom during the brew.
                        >
                        > French press also requires the use of a larger grind to the beans,
                        > which means one doesn't extract as much of the flavor. I think it's
                        > important to use a burr grinder to keep the powder down in the
                        > grounds, but you don't need a grinder good enough to do espresso grind.
                        >
                        > As you mentioned vac pots can do a better job of filtering the brew,
                        > and can be set up to keep the oils in the grinds with cloth or paper
                        > fillers if desired, or not, using screens or Cory style filters.
                        >
                        > Brian
                        >
                        > your mileage may vary ;-)
                        >
                        > --------------------------------------------------
                        > From: "opinicize" <opinicize@... <mailto:opinicize%40yahoo.com> >
                        > Sent: Friday, March 22, 2013 1:17 PM
                        > To: <vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com <mailto:vacuumcoffeepotcollector%40yahoogroups.com> >
                        > Subject: [vacpot] Vac Coffee vs French Press
                        >
                        >
                        > > Hi Brian,
                        > >
                        > > Sorry to be obtuse, but what are the two reasons French Press is not
                        > > as good? I cannot follow the thread properly to even pick out which
                        > > one reason was cited.
                        > >
                        > > But ... I love the ease of French Press but switched to pour over
                        > > (Melitta) because I didn't like the silt in the bottom of the mug,
                        > > and
                        > the
                        > > occasional grounds floating in my drink. So, I assume one of the two
                        > > reasons French Press is not liked is the one I just mentioned. It's
                        > > not worth the trouble to have to strain your coffee before you drink it.
                        > >
                        > >
                        > > Christine - Mpls
                        > >
                        > >
                        >
                        >
                        >

                        --

                        ----------------------------------------------------------
                        ----------

                        David Fiore

                        david@... <mailto:david%40fiores.org>

                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

                        ------------------------------------

                        Yahoo! Groups Links

                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      • larry h
                        After yesterdays not as good results I attempted to duplicate the first try which was fine. I brought the water to a boil.. about two and a half measuring
                        Message 11 of 16 , Mar 25, 2013
                        • 0 Attachment
                          After yesterdays not as good results I attempted to duplicate the first try which was fine.

                          I brought the water to a boil.. about two and a half measuring cups. I poured it over coarse grounds (three tablespoons) stirred it a bit, then poured about a third cup of cold water in. Instead of leaving it off the cory stove I put it back on it but it was unplugged. I left it sit for 5 minutes. I poured it though a strainer back into the first pot, it had grounds in it right off as did the first more successful try. The left over heat from the stove kept it agitating I suspect. However the taste was much closer to the first attempt.

                          When you think about it, it really is sort of like a manual vacpot.. You put your grounds in a container, I used the small cory percolator glass pot, with the baskets removed. You pour the boiling water over the grounds, (rather like the water raising in a vacuum pot), let it boil for a bit, then let it rest. (somewhat like some vacuum pots do before they return to the bottom.. I think when you figure the right system its a pretty close comparison in taste. In fact when it comes out the best it reminded me of the fleeting times I got that result from a vacuum pot.. That being the biggest complaint I had with them, duplication was not always the result.

                          One night I had company for dinner and decided to use my small neck Silex on its little half round stove. I did as it suggested and let it raise and then unplugged the stove. In fact that system of leaving it on the stove till it returns is very much like the resting time for the boiled method.. It seemed to take quite some time but finally it dropped.. Everyone raved about the smooth and delicious coffee.. Frankly I tired to many a day to get that exact result and rarely did.. I have always thought that the half minute to two minutes of standing in the upper chambers might be too short and caused the less than perfect results. The one vacuum pot that did that the most dependably was the Duralux. Sadly the seals on them are mostly shot causing them to drop the coffee often before it was done.

                          Larry
                          --- In vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com, Larry Hollenberg <larryhollenb@...> wrote:
                          >
                          > Hi all,
                          >
                          > As things will go today after my very tasty boiled coffee I decided to make some this afternoon.. I did it almost the same way. I did use a bit more water and perhaps then not quite enough grounds, or the ground beans which I had to mix a new batch of for the grinder might be slightly different. What ever I followed the suggested method of removing the coffee from the heat after the short boil period.  I left it on a trivet.. It poured with hardly any sediment at all down to the very bottom where the grounds sat mostly undisturbed.  So removing from the heat kept them from agitating a bit no doubt leaving them to settle as I recalled was the often the result. But this time the coffee lacks the extra smooth taste and I don't see the foam effect on the top of the brew before I poured it off the grounds.. I suspect that by leaving it on the off burner and it agitating for awhile it developed a different way which may have accounted for how good it was
                          > yesterday..   So as I suggested yesterday, some experimenting may be on order to figure out just what it takes to make it come out right. 
                          >
                          > I just know that if its brewed just right, you won't be disappointed, but if it has a lackluster effect something about it hasn't gone just right. 
                          >
                          > Larry
                          >
                          >
                          > ________________________________
                          > From: Larry Hollenberg <larryhollenb@...>
                          > To: "vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com" <vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com>
                          > Sent: Saturday, March 23, 2013 6:56 AM
                          > Subject: Re: [vacpot] Boiled Coffee
                          >
                          >
                          >  
                          > Hi Roland,
                          >
                          > Nice to see you with us again.  Some people probably do call it Cowboy Coffee. I would suppose the reason being that its something that was easily made without any special equipment.  There are numerous recipes in older cook books for how to successfully make boiled coffee.  Among them is the type where they added egg to the coffee.  Here is a recipe my old Meta Givens Modern Encyclopedia of Cooking book gives. 
                          >
                          > Old fashioned "Boiled Coffee"  Steeping Method
                          >
                          > Preheat pot by scalding with hot water. Measure 11/2 to 2 level tablespoons of regular or coarse grind coffee into the pot for each cup of water. (1/2 pint). To 5 or 6 tablespoons of coffee stir in about  1/2 tablespoon of beaten egg or egg whites or inner linings of egg shells. Pour on the measured amount of fresh boiling water. Stir over direct heat 1/2 minute.  Cover, turn off burner or remove from heat (if electric is used). Let stand to steep for 5 to 10 minutes depending on grind or strength desired. Pour coffee though a strainer if desired to serve. If not served at once remove and pour coffee though a strainer into a hot scaled pot. 
                          >
                          > There are other versions which are what I personally use.. You make it the same but  retaining about a fourth of the water and after the 1/2 minute brew you then pour the cold water into the pot.  (this causes the cold water to move the grounds to the bottom of the pan).  Serve as the same.  I keep it over a very low heat so it stays hot. 
                          >
                          > The egg shell variety had a bit of odd flavor from the egg to my taste. 
                          >
                          > Larry
                          >
                          > ________________________________
                          > From: Roland <rsburritt@...>
                          > To: vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com
                          > Sent: Friday, March 22, 2013 11:40 PM
                          > Subject: RE: [vacpot] Vac Coffee vs French Press
                          >
                          >
                          >  
                          > Larry, isn't that called "Cowboy Coffee" where you use the saucepan? I have never tried it, nor have I been where someone did the coffee that way, but I seem to recall someone saying once that you crack an egg into it to keep the grounds from spreading.
                          >
                          > Surprisingly, I have found that I also enjoy percolated coffee, but it has to be done just right, either on the stove or in a pot that does not overextract. So far, the only one I have found that makes pretty good coffee is the Farberware Superfast. I picked up a very old one NOS for a couple of dollars a few years ago and used it as my main pot for about a year. It made good coffee. One thing is that the coffee is also very hot like vacpot coffee. I also think the Pyrex glass percolator does a pretty good job, especially with flavored coffees (which are not suited for vacpot brewing).
                          >
                          > Roland
                          >
                          > From: vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com [mailto:vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Larry Hollenberg
                          > Sent: Friday, March 22, 2013 3:32 PM
                          > To: vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com
                          > Subject: Re: [vacpot] Vac Coffee vs French Press
                          >
                          > I have a photo in the photo album of a Melita electric drip coffee maker. Its a rather interesting looking piece and is in perfect shape.. I ran across it at an antique mall and had no idea what it was.. It turned out that Ian responded that it was the first Melita automatic coffee drip type system. I didn't use it much as I tried all kinds of other pots.. However the past bit I have gotten lazy about boiling water and using several pots to make drip manually or even the vac pots.. The old Melita has as you mentioned actually done a quite good job of producing a good brew and it does it very quickly.. I guess laziness is a symptom of older age..
                          >
                          > I did at some points also use the French Press type pots. The also make a reasonably rich brew to my taste. Something along the order perhaps of boiled coffee. Something else I used to do with a simple sauce pan. The secret to them was to add the cold water portion (usually about a cup to half cup) depending on how much you were making. Then letting it rest over low heat before serving. It would drop the grounds to the bottom and unless you really tilted the pot over it would serve clear coffee. One bad feature as the press has is that to really have it stay at its best you need to pour the coffee off the grounds after its done. The grounds cause it to become bitter in a fairly short time.
                          >
                          > Larry
                          >
                          > ________________________________
                          > From: Roland <rsburritt@... <mailto:rsburritt%40gmail.com> >
                          > To: vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com <mailto:vacuumcoffeepotcollector%40yahoogroups.com>
                          > Sent: Friday, March 22, 2013 2:46 PM
                          > Subject: RE: [vacpot] Vac Coffee vs French Press
                          >
                          > This is an interesting topic, seeing who prefers what and why.
                          >
                          > As far as flavor I prefer the pour-over Melitta method. This seems to
                          > produce a rich flavor without over-extraction. However, I like very hot
                          > coffee and even though I brew with 210-215 degree water, by the time the
                          > pour-over finishes brewing (I brew in a 2-cup batch) the brewed coffee in
                          > the decanter has cooled down to below where I like it so I end up having to
                          > zap it for a few seconds in the cup to get it hot enough again. With a vac
                          > pot, there is I feel a bit of compromise on flavor but the coffee comes out
                          > of the pot piping hot, which I like.
                          >
                          > I'm 50/50 on a Coffee Press. I used one for several years and it does
                          > produce a tasty brew, but you have to transfer it directly to another
                          > decanter to avoid any overextraction (even with the grounds already pushed
                          > down to the bottom). The Press is also the most complex to clean, which I
                          > don't enjoy. The simplest as far as clean up is the Melitta followed by the
                          > vac pot.
                          >
                          > One thing about the press is that you can start with the absolute cheapest
                          > generic store bought pre-ground, semi-stale coffee...and still end up with a
                          > half-decent brew.
                          >
                          > Roland
                          >
                          > -----Original Message-----
                          > From: vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com <mailto:vacuumcoffeepotcollector%40yahoogroups.com>
                          > [mailto:vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com <mailto:vacuumcoffeepotcollector%40yahoogroups.com> ] On Behalf Of David Fiore
                          > Sent: Friday, March 22, 2013 12:36 PM
                          > To: vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com <mailto:vacuumcoffeepotcollector%40yahoogroups.com>
                          > Subject: Re: [vacpot] Vac Coffee vs French Press
                          >
                          > I switch to vac pots for the following reasons:
                          >
                          > - I loved the flavor of my french press but...
                          > - the kids kept knocking it of the counter and breaking it so I kept
                          > having to buy new ones
                          > - the Sunbeam C30s were virtually indestructible
                          > - I love the coffee from my C30!
                          >
                          > A friend of mine loves the vac pot over the french press primarily because
                          > it keeps the coffee hot, whereas the french press did not.
                          >
                          > Cheers,
                          > -dbf
                          >
                          > On Fri, Mar 22, 2013 at 1:52 PM, Brian Helfrich <bhelfric@... <mailto:bhelfric%40hotmail.com> >wrote:
                          >
                          > > **
                          > >
                          > >
                          > > For me the first two in this list have the biggest impact on the
                          > > coffee
                          > > flavor:
                          > >
                          > > Vac pots can keep the water in the 200 F +/- degree range while
                          > > brewing so you get a better bloom during the brew.
                          > >
                          > > French press also requires the use of a larger grind to the beans,
                          > > which means one doesn't extract as much of the flavor. I think it's
                          > > important to use a burr grinder to keep the powder down in the
                          > > grounds, but you don't need a grinder good enough to do espresso grind.
                          > >
                          > > As you mentioned vac pots can do a better job of filtering the brew,
                          > > and can be set up to keep the oils in the grinds with cloth or paper
                          > > fillers if desired, or not, using screens or Cory style filters.
                          > >
                          > > Brian
                          > >
                          > > your mileage may vary ;-)
                          > >
                          > > --------------------------------------------------
                          > > From: "opinicize" <opinicize@... <mailto:opinicize%40yahoo.com> >
                          > > Sent: Friday, March 22, 2013 1:17 PM
                          > > To: <vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com <mailto:vacuumcoffeepotcollector%40yahoogroups.com> >
                          > > Subject: [vacpot] Vac Coffee vs French Press
                          > >
                          > >
                          > > > Hi Brian,
                          > > >
                          > > > Sorry to be obtuse, but what are the two reasons French Press is not
                          > > > as good? I cannot follow the thread properly to even pick out which
                          > > > one reason was cited.
                          > > >
                          > > > But ... I love the ease of French Press but switched to pour over
                          > > > (Melitta) because I didn't like the silt in the bottom of the mug,
                          > > > and
                          > > the
                          > > > occasional grounds floating in my drink. So, I assume one of the two
                          > > > reasons French Press is not liked is the one I just mentioned. It's
                          > > > not worth the trouble to have to strain your coffee before you drink it.
                          > > >
                          > > >
                          > > > Christine - Mpls
                          > > >
                          > > >
                          > >
                          > >
                          > >
                          >
                          > --
                          >
                          > ----------------------------------------------------------
                          > ----------
                          >
                          > David Fiore
                          >
                          > david@... <mailto:david%40fiores.org>
                          >
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                        • Dave Leonard
                          Larry, The secret to good and consistent manual vac brewed coffee is absolute consistency in the brewing process. You will need a deep fay/candy thermometer. I
                          Message 12 of 16 , Mar 26, 2013
                          • 0 Attachment
                            Larry,

                            The secret to good and consistent manual vac brewed coffee is absolute consistency in the brewing process. You will need a deep fay/candy thermometer. I heat my water in an electric heater, then pour into the lower bowl. When the water is all the way up into the funnel, I keep track of the temperature. I hold it between 200F and 205F. I have a gas stove, so easy to do tiny adjustments while brewing. When the water is in the right range, I dump the medium ground beans into the funnel, stir enough to make sure all the grounds are wet, then just keep it temperature regulated for two minutes (nice foam head appears quickly). I then completely remove from heat. Takes about 3.5 minutes to draw down completely. As the last cup is being sucked down, the temp is still between 190F and 195F. I use about 2/3 the recommended grounds (grind while the water is rising). You vary this to your individual taste.

                            Try this as a starting point, and write down every step you do. Experiment for a few days by doing ONE variable until you have it just the way you like it, then follow that procedure precisely. The coffee will be very consistent. After a while, you have it memorized and it then becomes simple.
                            Good luck in finding that perfect and consistent brew.

                            Dave in Michigan



                            ________________________________
                            From: larry h <larryhollenb@...>
                            To: vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com
                            Sent: Monday, March 25, 2013 4:06 PM
                            Subject: Re: [vacpot] Boiled Coffee Update II


                             
                            After yesterdays not as good results I attempted to duplicate the first try which was fine.

                            I brought the water to a boil.. about two and a half measuring cups. I poured it over coarse grounds (three tablespoons) stirred it a bit, then poured about a third cup of cold water in. Instead of leaving it off the cory stove I put it back on it but it was unplugged. I left it sit for 5 minutes. I poured it though a strainer back into the first pot, it had grounds in it right off as did the first more successful try. The left over heat from the stove kept it agitating I suspect. However the taste was much closer to the first attempt.

                            When you think about it, it really is sort of like a manual vacpot.. You put your grounds in a container, I used the small cory percolator glass pot, with the baskets removed. You pour the boiling water over the grounds, (rather like the water raising in a vacuum pot), let it boil for a bit, then let it rest. (somewhat like some vacuum pots do before they return to the bottom.. I think when you figure the right system its a pretty close comparison in taste. In fact when it comes out the best it reminded me of the fleeting times I got that result from a vacuum pot.. That being the biggest complaint I had with them, duplication was not always the result.

                            One night I had company for dinner and decided to use my small neck Silex on its little half round stove. I did as it suggested and let it raise and then unplugged the stove. In fact that system of leaving it on the stove till it returns is very much like the resting time for the boiled method.. It seemed to take quite some time but finally it dropped.. Everyone raved about the smooth and delicious coffee.. Frankly I tired to many a day to get that exact result and rarely did.. I have always thought that the half minute to two minutes of standing in the upper chambers might be too short and caused the less than perfect results. The one vacuum pot that did that the most dependably was the Duralux. Sadly the seals on them are mostly shot causing them to drop the coffee often before it was done.

                            Larry
                            --- In vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com, Larry Hollenberg <larryhollenb@...> wrote:
                            >
                            > Hi all,
                            >
                            > As things will go today after my very tasty boiled coffee I decided to make some this afternoon.. I did it almost the same way. I did use a bit more water and perhaps then not quite enough grounds, or the ground beans which I had to mix a new batch of for the grinder might be slightly different. What ever I followed the suggested method of removing the coffee from the heat after the short boil period.  I left it on a trivet.. It poured with hardly any sediment at all down to the very bottom where the grounds sat mostly undisturbed.  So removing from the heat kept them from agitating a bit no doubt leaving them to settle as I recalled was the often the result. But this time the coffee lacks the extra smooth taste and I don't see the foam effect on the top of the brew before I poured it off the grounds.. I suspect that by leaving it on the off burner and it agitating for awhile it developed a different way which may have accounted for how good it
                            was
                            > yesterday..   So as I suggested yesterday, some experimenting may be on order to figure out just what it takes to make it come out right. 
                            >
                            > I just know that if its brewed just right, you won't be disappointed, but if it has a lackluster effect something about it hasn't gone just right. 
                            >
                            > Larry
                            >
                            >
                            > ________________________________
                            > From: Larry Hollenberg <larryhollenb@...>
                            > To: "vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.comvacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com>
                            > Sent: Saturday, March 23, 2013 6:56 AM
                            > Subject: Re: [vacpot] Boiled Coffee
                            >
                            >
                            >  
                            > Hi Roland,
                            >
                            > Nice to see you with us again.  Some people probably do call it Cowboy Coffee. I would suppose the reason being that its something that was easily made without any special equipment.  There are numerous recipes in older cook books for how to successfully make boiled coffee.  Among them is the type where they added egg to the coffee.  Here is a recipe my old Meta Givens Modern Encyclopedia of Cooking book gives. 
                            >
                            > Old fashioned "Boiled Coffee"  Steeping Method
                            >
                            > Preheat pot by scalding with hot water. Measure 11/2 to 2 level tablespoons of regular or coarse grind coffee into the pot for each cup of water. (1/2 pint). To 5 or 6 tablespoons of coffee stir in about  1/2 tablespoon of beaten egg or egg whites or inner linings of egg shells. Pour on the measured amount of fresh boiling water. Stir over direct heat 1/2 minute.  Cover, turn off burner or remove from heat (if electric is used). Let stand to steep for 5 to 10 minutes depending on grind or strength desired. Pour coffee though a strainer if desired to serve. If not served at once remove and pour coffee though a strainer into a hot scaled pot. 
                            >
                            > There are other versions which are what I personally use.. You make it the same but  retaining about a fourth of the water and after the 1/2 minute brew you then pour the cold water into the pot.  (this causes the cold water to move the grounds to the bottom of the pan).  Serve as the same.  I keep it over a very low heat so it stays hot. 
                            >
                            > The egg shell variety had a bit of odd flavor from the egg to my taste. 
                            >
                            > Larry
                            >
                            > ________________________________
                            > From: Roland <rsburritt@...>
                            > To: vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com
                            > Sent: Friday, March 22, 2013 11:40 PM
                            > Subject: RE: [vacpot] Vac Coffee vs French Press
                            >
                            >
                            >  
                            > Larry, isn't that called "Cowboy Coffee" where you use the saucepan? I have never tried it, nor have I been where someone did the coffee that way, but I seem to recall someone saying once that you crack an egg into it to keep the grounds from spreading.
                            >
                            > Surprisingly, I have found that I also enjoy percolated coffee, but it has to be done just right, either on the stove or in a pot that does not overextract. So far, the only one I have found that makes pretty good coffee is the Farberware Superfast. I picked up a very old one NOS for a couple of dollars a few years ago and used it as my main pot for about a year. It made good coffee. One thing is that the coffee is also very hot like vacpot coffee. I also think the Pyrex glass percolator does a pretty good job, especially with flavored coffees (which are not suited for vacpot brewing).
                            >
                            > Roland
                            >
                            > From: vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com [mailto:vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Larry Hollenberg
                            > Sent: Friday, March 22, 2013 3:32 PM
                            > To: vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com
                            > Subject: Re: [vacpot] Vac Coffee vs French Press
                            >
                            > I have a photo in the photo album of a Melita electric drip coffee maker. Its a rather interesting looking piece and is in perfect shape.. I ran across it at an antique mall and had no idea what it was.. It turned out that Ian responded that it was the first Melita automatic coffee drip type system. I didn't use it much as I tried all kinds of other pots.. However the past bit I have gotten lazy about boiling water and using several pots to make drip manually or even the vac pots.. The old Melita has as you mentioned actually done a quite good job of producing a good brew and it does it very quickly.. I guess laziness is a symptom of older age..
                            >
                            > I did at some points also use the French Press type pots. The also make a reasonably rich brew to my taste. Something along the order perhaps of boiled coffee. Something else I used to do with a simple sauce pan. The secret to them was to add the cold water portion (usually about a cup to half cup) depending on how much you were making. Then letting it rest over low heat before serving. It would drop the grounds to the bottom and unless you really tilted the pot over it would serve clear coffee. One bad feature as the press has is that to really have it stay at its best you need to pour the coffee off the grounds after its done. The grounds cause it to become bitter in a fairly short time.
                            >
                            > Larry
                            >
                            > ________________________________
                            > From: Roland <rsburritt@... <mailto:rsburritt%40gmail.com> >
                            > To: vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com <mailto:vacuumcoffeepotcollector%40yahoogroups.com>
                            > Sent: Friday, March 22, 2013 2:46 PM
                            > Subject: RE: [vacpot] Vac Coffee vs French Press
                            >
                            > This is an interesting topic, seeing who prefers what and why.
                            >
                            > As far as flavor I prefer the pour-over Melitta method. This seems to
                            > produce a rich flavor without over-extraction. However, I like very hot
                            > coffee and even though I brew with 210-215 degree water, by the time the
                            > pour-over finishes brewing (I brew in a 2-cup batch) the brewed coffee in
                            > the decanter has cooled down to below where I like it so I end up having to
                            > zap it for a few seconds in the cup to get it hot enough again. With a vac
                            > pot, there is I feel a bit of compromise on flavor but the coffee comes out
                            > of the pot piping hot, which I like.
                            >
                            > I'm 50/50 on a Coffee Press. I used one for several years and it does
                            > produce a tasty brew, but you have to transfer it directly to another
                            > decanter to avoid any overextraction (even with the grounds already pushed
                            > down to the bottom). The Press is also the most complex to clean, which I
                            > don't enjoy. The simplest as far as clean up is the Melitta followed by the
                            > vac pot.
                            >
                            > One thing about the press is that you can start with the absolute cheapest
                            > generic store bought pre-ground, semi-stale coffee...and still end up with a
                            > half-decent brew.
                            >
                            > Roland
                            >
                            > -----Original Message-----
                            > From: vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com <mailto:vacuumcoffeepotcollector%40yahoogroups.com>
                            > [mailto:vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com <mailto:vacuumcoffeepotcollector%40yahoogroups.com> ] On Behalf Of David Fiore
                            > Sent: Friday, March 22, 2013 12:36 PM
                            > To: vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com <mailto:vacuumcoffeepotcollector%40yahoogroups.com>
                            > Subject: Re: [vacpot] Vac Coffee vs French Press
                            >
                            > I switch to vac pots for the following reasons:
                            >
                            > - I loved the flavor of my french press but...
                            > - the kids kept knocking it of the counter and breaking it so I kept
                            > having to buy new ones
                            > - the Sunbeam C30s were virtually indestructible
                            > - I love the coffee from my C30!
                            >
                            > A friend of mine loves the vac pot over the french press primarily because
                            > it keeps the coffee hot, whereas the french press did not.
                            >
                            > Cheers,
                            > -dbf
                            >
                            > On Fri, Mar 22, 2013 at 1:52 PM, Brian Helfrich <bhelfric@... <mailto:bhelfric%40hotmail.com> >wrote:
                            >
                            > > **
                            > >
                            > >
                            > > For me the first two in this list have the biggest impact on the
                            > > coffee
                            > > flavor:
                            > >
                            > > Vac pots can keep the water in the 200 F +/- degree range while
                            > > brewing so you get a better bloom during the brew.
                            > >
                            > > French press also requires the use of a larger grind to the beans,
                            > > which means one doesn't extract as much of the flavor. I think it's
                            > > important to use a burr grinder to keep the powder down in the
                            > > grounds, but you don't need a grinder good enough to do espresso grind.
                            > >
                            > > As you mentioned vac pots can do a better job of filtering the brew,
                            > > and can be set up to keep the oils in the grinds with cloth or paper
                            > > fillers if desired, or not, using screens or Cory style filters.
                            > >
                            > > Brian
                            > >
                            > > your mileage may vary ;-)
                            > >
                            > > --------------------------------------------------
                            > > From: "opinicize" <opinicize@... <mailto:opinicize%40yahoo.com> >
                            > > Sent: Friday, March 22, 2013 1:17 PM
                            > > To: <vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com <mailto:vacuumcoffeepotcollector%40yahoogroups.com> >
                            > > Subject: [vacpot] Vac Coffee vs French Press
                            > >
                            > >
                            > > > Hi Brian,
                            > > >
                            > > > Sorry to be obtuse, but what are the two reasons French Press is not
                            > > > as good? I cannot follow the thread properly to even pick out which
                            > > > one reason was cited.
                            > > >
                            > > > But ... I love the ease of French Press but switched to pour over
                            > > > (Melitta) because I didn't like the silt in the bottom of the mug,
                            > > > and
                            > > the
                            > > > occasional grounds floating in my drink. So, I assume one of the two
                            > > > reasons French Press is not liked is the one I just mentioned. It's
                            > > > not worth the trouble to have to strain your coffee before you drink it.
                            > > >
                            > > >
                            > > > Christine - Mpls
                            > > >
                            > > >
                            > >
                            > >
                            > >
                            >
                            > --
                            >
                            > ----------------------------------------------------------
                            > ----------
                            >
                            > David Fiore
                            >
                            > david@... <mailto:david%40fiores.org>
                            >
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