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Sunbeam C30A Burned Out

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  • eccopronto
    Hello Folks! I use my C30A as my go-to every day pot. Today in the middle of its boiling cycle the high/low switch and the plug began to smoke and burn.
    Message 1 of 6 , Mar 8, 2013
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      Hello Folks! I use my C30A as my go-to every day pot. Today in the middle of its boiling cycle the high/low switch and the plug began to smoke and burn. What happened to my pot? What caused this burnout?

      I have a bunch of other vac pots, but that old sunbeam was my work horse. I will miss it!

      Anyone have any thoughts on what might have caused this melt down?

      Thanks guys.

      Best,
      Leonard
    • littleb193
      Hello Leonard. I had one that seemed to burn out on me recently. However, it turned out to be the power cord that was smoking due to a short in the plug in
      Message 2 of 6 , Mar 11, 2013
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        Hello Leonard.

        I had one that seemed to 'burn out' on me recently. However, it turned out to be the power cord that was smoking due to a short in the plug in portion. It gave the impression of the thing totally dieing as the pot wasn't warmed up at all.

        Try taking the plug apart and see if you see anything amiss. If so just replace the cord and you should be back in business! Let us know what happens.

        Bri

        --- In vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com, "eccopronto" <lennylenny@...> wrote:
        >
        > Hello Folks! I use my C30A as my go-to every day pot. Today in the middle of its boiling cycle the high/low switch and the plug began to smoke and burn. What happened to my pot? What caused this burnout?
        >
        > I have a bunch of other vac pots, but that old sunbeam was my work horse. I will miss it!
        >
        > Anyone have any thoughts on what might have caused this melt down?
        >
        > Thanks guys.
        >
        > Best,
        > Leonard
        >
      • P. Wilhelm
        Yes, agreed, check out the power cord AND the prongs in the socket of the pot. The latter should be a nice silver color. I just picked up a second C20B, which
        Message 3 of 6 , Mar 12, 2013
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          Yes, agreed, check out the power cord AND the prongs in the socket of the pot. The latter should be a nice silver color.

          I just picked up a second C20B, which is kind of rough (parts unit), and noticed the plug was hot as heck after I tested it. Dirty/rusty prongs were the culprit and can actually cause a fire due to what's called a "resistive short".
        • littleb193
          I m glad you mentioned this...I ve noticed my plug getting crazy hot and they aren t a silver color. Hadn t even thought of the resistance. It doesn t help
          Message 4 of 6 , Mar 12, 2013
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            I'm glad you mentioned this...I've noticed my plug getting crazy hot and they aren't a silver color. Hadn't even thought of the resistance. It doesn't help when water bubbles over and down into the plug either, maybe that is why they tend to deteriorate.

            What do you think about using dielectric grease on them once they are cleaned up pretty-like?

            Bri

            --- In vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com, "P. Wilhelm" <pawilh@...> wrote:
            >
            > Yes, agreed, check out the power cord AND the prongs in the socket of the pot. The latter should be a nice silver color.
            >
            > I just picked up a second C20B, which is kind of rough (parts unit), and noticed the plug was hot as heck after I tested it. Dirty/rusty prongs were the culprit and can actually cause a fire due to what's called a "resistive short".
            >
          • eccopronto
            The smell of burnt plastic in the unit is too strong to use the pot again, but i will clean the contacts on my cory electric and my farberware robot! Thanks
            Message 5 of 6 , Mar 13, 2013
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              The smell of burnt plastic in the unit is too strong to use the pot again, but i will clean the contacts on my cory electric and my farberware robot! Thanks for the tip

              Best
              Leonard

              --- In vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com, "littleb193" <littleb193@...> wrote:
              >
              > I'm glad you mentioned this...I've noticed my plug getting crazy hot and they aren't a silver color. Hadn't even thought of the resistance. It doesn't help when water bubbles over and down into the plug either, maybe that is why they tend to deteriorate.
              >
              > What do you think about using dielectric grease on them once they are cleaned up pretty-like?
              >
              > Bri
              >
              > --- In vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com, "P. Wilhelm" <pawilh@> wrote:
              > >
              > > Yes, agreed, check out the power cord AND the prongs in the socket of the pot. The latter should be a nice silver color.
              > >
              > > I just picked up a second C20B, which is kind of rough (parts unit), and noticed the plug was hot as heck after I tested it. Dirty/rusty prongs were the culprit and can actually cause a fire due to what's called a "resistive short".
              > >
              >
            • P. Wilhelm
              Clean them very lightly if there is still some of the factory plating left on the prongs. You don t want to remove that. If they re rusty, the safest thing to
              Message 6 of 6 , Mar 13, 2013
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                Clean them very lightly if there is still some of the factory plating left on the prongs. You don't want to remove that.

                If they're rusty, the safest thing to do would be replace them with good ones, if that's even possible. Really hard to advise you on that--I don't think anyone does small appliance repairs like that anymore, but it may be worth checking into. That guy on that American Restoration show appears to work on vintage elex appliances, so someone must have those sorts of parts available someplace.

                A good cleaning and some dielectric grease would probably be ok if the pot was used infrequently, and monitored. For everyday use I wouldn't risk it.

                A resistive short occurs when a stray resistance builds up somewhere in the circuit, usually starting with a loose or bad connection, but rusty prongs would also do it.

                Once the resistance gets high enough, it begins to rob power from the actual load, and begins to dissipate heat. As the bad connection gets hotter, the resistance can and usually increases to the point of it catching fire.

                You'd think that in a situation like that your circuit breaker would trip, but that's not always the case.
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