Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

[vacpot] Re: life span

Expand Messages
  • John A.
    You are welcome, Roland. The last production of these is the best. It has the mesh filter with the six support spokes, the small bypass rivet, and the
    Message 1 of 30 , Feb 17, 2013
    View Source
    • 0 Attachment
      You are welcome, Roland. The last production of these is the best. It has the mesh filter with the six support spokes, the small "bypass rivet," and the permanent silicone rubber ring. I've been using the same one for years, only needing to soak it every couple of months in some Urnex Cafiza solution to keep it fresh.

      John A.

      --- In vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com, "rsburritt" <rsburritt@...> wrote:
      >
      > John,
      > Thank you for the excellent pictorial rundown on the coffeemaster filters. I haven't used my vac pots in a few years but recently started again (after acquiring some new ones) and this was very helpful.
      >
      > Roland
      >
      > --- In vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com, "John A." <kreuzueber.halbmond@> wrote:
      > >
      > > Actually, what you are describing about the terminal plug on the cord is pretty common to all coffee pots, especially ones that are used daily. The connectors in a new cord will grip the pins tightly, making a solid electrical connection. Over time, the connectors in the cord end get looser, then you begin to lose that good, tight connection, which causes overheating at the pins; the result is then as you describe. At one time, you could buy a replacement end for coffee pot cords at the hardware store, but now you just buy the whole cord when the old one is worn out. Around $5.00.
      > >
      > > If the plating in your pot is worn away, then copper is leaching into your coffee. Some say it's bad and some don't mind. I actually think it does affect the taste in a negative way.
      > >
      > > If you decide to go with a C30, the most important thing is to keep the switch dry. Do that and keep it clean and adjusted, and you will have about the best electric coffee maker around. Here is the rundown on Coffeemaster filter systems:
      > >
      > > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/vacuumcoffeepotcollector/photos/album/1892080296/pic/list
      > >
      > > John A.
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > --- In vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com, Chuck Neville <chuckneville@> wrote:
      > > >
      > > > The problem for me was around the plug. It seems that a lot of heat
      > > > develops where the plug fits onto the two
      > > > pins. In this case the pins became loose. I took it apart and put a
      > > > new washer and tightened up the little nuts
      > > > that held the pins in place. A little further down the road the plastic
      > > > which held the pins deteriorated to the point
      > > > that the pins had no foundation. On my present one I am noticing that
      > > > the pins are staying in good shape but
      > > > part of the plastic on the plug itself is starting to melt away and
      > > > disappear. I was led to believe by a rather scholarly
      > > > article written on the net about these coffee makers that the only one
      > > > worth buying was the C50 as the others had
      > > > different drawbacks such as difficulties with the filters and having to
      > > > replace a cloth? filter in the C30. But what you
      > > > say seems to put a different light on things. I don't find any problem
      > > > with the spring steel, nylon type filter in my
      > > > C 50. Can you use the same one in the C30. If so and the pot
      > > > mechanical parts of the machine will keep on going forever
      > > > then that seems to be the best choice.
      > > > Also as to the chrome plating on the lower pot. I think I have
      > > > scrubbed most of it away. I still use it. Do you think that
      > > > this really adversely effects the coffee? I don't find any problems
      > > > with the taste. Thanks for the feedback.
      > > >
      > > > Chuck
      > > >
      > > > On 2/06/12 11:38 AM, John A. wrote:
      > > > >
      > > > >
      > > > >
      > > > > Chuck,
      > > > >
      > > > > How did the C50 die? Like I've mentioned before, in my view, the
      > > > > quality of the C50 just does not match that of the earlier C30's.
      > > > > Unlike the open base of the C30's which allows for air flow, the C50
      > > > > is a sealed, watertight unit. The heat builds up, taking a toll on the
      > > > > electromechanical parts. A couple of other weaknesses I've seen are
      > > > > the locking tabs on the upper pot wear out and don't fully compress
      > > > > the O-ring, so sometimes the pot will lift off during brewing; and the
      > > > > quality of the chrome plating inside the lower pot is thin and wears
      > > > > away easily. However, everything except the main heating element in
      > > > > the C50 is repairable/replaceable, though new chrome plating might be
      > > > > a bit difficult. In my experience, a C30C with a good gasket and a
      > > > > switch that is kept dry and properly adjusted will last indefinitely.
      > > > >
      > > > > John A.
      > > > >
      > > > > --- In vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com
      > > > > <mailto:vacuumcoffeepotcollector%40yahoogroups.com>, Chuck Neville
      > > > > <chuckneville@> wrote:
      > > > > >
      > > > > > It seems that many of you have lots of experience with c50s. What do
      > > > > > you think the average life span of one of
      > > > > > these babies is. I had one which I got on ebay that lasted about 3 or 4
      > > > > > years and now I am on my second one. I
      > > > > > use mine every day once. The thing that drew me to this coffe maker in
      > > > > > the first place was that I can't use those
      > > > > > drip machines seeing that I have fairly hard water and in no time they
      > > > > > are sputtering and spitting and hardly
      > > > > > any water is getting through. I have thought of trying an electric
      > > > > > percolator but wasn't sure how well they work.
      > > > > > We like the convenience of an electric model.
      > > > > >
      > > > > >
      > > > > > Chuck.
      > > > >
      > > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      > > >
      > >
      >
    • Roland
      I was fortunate that I recently picked up a couple of coffeemasters very cheap that had one complete last-model assembly, plus an extra mesh filter (the one
      Message 2 of 30 , Feb 18, 2013
      View Source
      • 0 Attachment
        I was fortunate that I recently picked up a couple of coffeemasters very
        cheap that had one complete last-model assembly, plus an extra mesh filter
        (the one with the permanent silicone ring) and as a bonus.the elusive
        coffeemaster upper bowl stand. I still haven't used the coffee master
        because I need a good lower with good plating and a new seal for the upper.
        But the coffeemaster filter works great in other pots.



        Roland



        From: vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com
        [mailto:vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of John A.
        Sent: Sunday, February 17, 2013 9:23 PM
        To: vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [vacpot] Re: life span







        You are welcome, Roland. The last production of these is the best. It has
        the mesh filter with the six support spokes, the small "bypass rivet," and
        the permanent silicone rubber ring. I've been using the same one for years,
        only needing to soak it every couple of months in some Urnex Cafiza solution
        to keep it fresh.

        John A.

        --- In vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com
        <mailto:vacuumcoffeepotcollector%40yahoogroups.com> , "rsburritt" wrote:
        >
        > John,
        > Thank you for the excellent pictorial rundown on the coffeemaster filters.
        I haven't used my vac pots in a few years but recently started again (after
        acquiring some new ones) and this was very helpful.
        >
        > Roland
        >
        > --- In vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com
        <mailto:vacuumcoffeepotcollector%40yahoogroups.com> , "John A." wrote:
        > >
        > > Actually, what you are describing about the terminal plug on the cord is
        pretty common to all coffee pots, especially ones that are used daily. The
        connectors in a new cord will grip the pins tightly, making a solid
        electrical connection. Over time, the connectors in the cord end get looser,
        then you begin to lose that good, tight connection, which causes overheating
        at the pins; the result is then as you describe. At one time, you could buy
        a replacement end for coffee pot cords at the hardware store, but now you
        just buy the whole cord when the old one is worn out. Around $5.00.
        > >
        > > If the plating in your pot is worn away, then copper is leaching into
        your coffee. Some say it's bad and some don't mind. I actually think it does
        affect the taste in a negative way.
        > >
        > > If you decide to go with a C30, the most important thing is to keep the
        switch dry. Do that and keep it clean and adjusted, and you will have about
        the best electric coffee maker around. Here is the rundown on Coffeemaster
        filter systems:
        > >
        > >
        http://groups.yahoo.com/group/vacuumcoffeepotcollector/photos/album/18920802
        96/pic/list
        > >
        > > John A.
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > --- In vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com
        <mailto:vacuumcoffeepotcollector%40yahoogroups.com> , Chuck Neville wrote:
        > > >
        > > > The problem for me was around the plug. It seems that a lot of heat
        > > > develops where the plug fits onto the two
        > > > pins. In this case the pins became loose. I took it apart and put a
        > > > new washer and tightened up the little nuts
        > > > that held the pins in place. A little further down the road the
        plastic
        > > > which held the pins deteriorated to the point
        > > > that the pins had no foundation. On my present one I am noticing that
        > > > the pins are staying in good shape but
        > > > part of the plastic on the plug itself is starting to melt away and
        > > > disappear. I was led to believe by a rather scholarly
        > > > article written on the net about these coffee makers that the only one

        > > > worth buying was the C50 as the others had
        > > > different drawbacks such as difficulties with the filters and having
        to
        > > > replace a cloth? filter in the C30. But what you
        > > > say seems to put a different light on things. I don't find any problem

        > > > with the spring steel, nylon type filter in my
        > > > C 50. Can you use the same one in the C30. If so and the pot
        > > > mechanical parts of the machine will keep on going forever
        > > > then that seems to be the best choice.
        > > > Also as to the chrome plating on the lower pot. I think I have
        > > > scrubbed most of it away. I still use it. Do you think that
        > > > this really adversely effects the coffee? I don't find any problems
        > > > with the taste. Thanks for the feedback.
        > > >
        > > > Chuck
        > > >
        > > > On 2/06/12 11:38 AM, John A. wrote:
        > > > >
        > > > >
        > > > >
        > > > > Chuck,
        > > > >
        > > > > How did the C50 die? Like I've mentioned before, in my view, the
        > > > > quality of the C50 just does not match that of the earlier C30's.
        > > > > Unlike the open base of the C30's which allows for air flow, the C50

        > > > > is a sealed, watertight unit. The heat builds up, taking a toll on
        the
        > > > > electromechanical parts. A couple of other weaknesses I've seen are
        > > > > the locking tabs on the upper pot wear out and don't fully compress
        > > > > the O-ring, so sometimes the pot will lift off during brewing; and
        the
        > > > > quality of the chrome plating inside the lower pot is thin and wears

        > > > > away easily. However, everything except the main heating element in
        > > > > the C50 is repairable/replaceable, though new chrome plating might
        be
        > > > > a bit difficult. In my experience, a C30C with a good gasket and a
        > > > > switch that is kept dry and properly adjusted will last
        indefinitely.
        > > > >
        > > > > John A.
        > > > >
        > > > > --- In vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com
        <mailto:vacuumcoffeepotcollector%40yahoogroups.com>
        > > > > , Chuck Neville
        > > > > wrote:
        > > > > >
        > > > > > It seems that many of you have lots of experience with c50s. What
        do
        > > > > > you think the average life span of one of
        > > > > > these babies is. I had one which I got on ebay that lasted about 3
        or 4
        > > > > > years and now I am on my second one. I
        > > > > > use mine every day once. The thing that drew me to this coffe
        maker in
        > > > > > the first place was that I can't use those
        > > > > > drip machines seeing that I have fairly hard water and in no time
        they
        > > > > > are sputtering and spitting and hardly
        > > > > > any water is getting through. I have thought of trying an electric
        > > > > > percolator but wasn't sure how well they work.
        > > > > > We like the convenience of an electric model.
        > > > > >
        > > > > >
        > > > > > Chuck.
        > > > >
        > > > >
        > > >
        > > >
        > > >
        > > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        > > >
        > >
        >





        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.