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Septic

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  • Stephen
    Chuck and John A., Our most recent home is a 1960 s ranch-burger style house that was completed gutted and remodeled prior to our purchasing it. The remodel
    Message 1 of 6 , Jan 26, 2012
      Chuck and John A.,

      Our most recent home is a 1960's ranch-burger style house that was completed
      gutted and remodeled prior to our purchasing it. The remodel included all new
      plumbing among many other updated amenities.

      We use to dump everything down the drain because the seller installed a garbage disposal at the kitchen sink. After about 5 years a gurgle could be heard coming from the bar sink in the kitchen when we ran water down the drain at the main sink.

      Long story short, a 20 foot section of the 2-inch PVC, kitchen drainpipe underneath the house was removed and we were horrified at what we saw. The 2-inch pipe was filled with a solid sludge except for an area about the size of a pencil at the bottom of the pipe that provided the only drainage. The sludge consisted of coffee grinds, food solids and detergent slime.

      I immediately called the plumber to snake lines and vacuum the septic tank. Once the septic tank was opened, the plumber jabbed a shovel into the tank and let go of the shovel--it stood straight up--embedded in solids!

      All that is behind us now. Today, if it's not liquid, it does not go down the drain with the exception of solid human waste. It's either to the compost or out the door in the trashcan.

      If one wants to know what NOT to put down their drains that flow to a septic tank and to better understand septic systems, please go to this website offered by the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Services and the US Department of Agriculture and read the 2 page PDF file:

      http://www.fcs.uga.edu/ext/pubs/hace/HACE-E-47.pdf

      This site certainly educated me after that horrible plumbing scare. I've tried to live by these rules since. Because maintenance is key to a happy septic system!

      Call me a fanatic if you wish,

      Stephen
    • John A.
      Stephen, Thanks for the link. I guess I m living right ... or on borrowed time. Septic system here is over 50 years old. Vacuum coffee everyday, vacuum septic
      Message 2 of 6 , Jan 26, 2012
        Stephen,
        Thanks for the link. I guess I'm living right ... or on borrowed time. Septic system here is over 50 years old. Vacuum coffee everyday, vacuum septic every ten years. And the beat goes on..
        Cheers,
        John A.

        --- In vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com, "Stephen" <tnswt12@...> wrote:
        >
        > Chuck and John A.,
        >
        > Our most recent home is a 1960's ranch-burger style house that was completed
        > gutted and remodeled prior to our purchasing it. The remodel included all new
        > plumbing among many other updated amenities.
        >
        > We use to dump everything down the drain because the seller installed a garbage disposal at the kitchen sink. After about 5 years a gurgle could be heard coming from the bar sink in the kitchen when we ran water down the drain at the main sink.
        >
        > Long story short, a 20 foot section of the 2-inch PVC, kitchen drainpipe underneath the house was removed and we were horrified at what we saw. The 2-inch pipe was filled with a solid sludge except for an area about the size of a pencil at the bottom of the pipe that provided the only drainage. The sludge consisted of coffee grinds, food solids and detergent slime.
        >
        > I immediately called the plumber to snake lines and vacuum the septic tank. Once the septic tank was opened, the plumber jabbed a shovel into the tank and let go of the shovel--it stood straight up--embedded in solids!
        >
        > All that is behind us now. Today, if it's not liquid, it does not go down the drain with the exception of solid human waste. It's either to the compost or out the door in the trashcan.
        >
        > If one wants to know what NOT to put down their drains that flow to a septic tank and to better understand septic systems, please go to this website offered by the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Services and the US Department of Agriculture and read the 2 page PDF file:
        >
        > http://www.fcs.uga.edu/ext/pubs/hace/HACE-E-47.pdf
        >
        > This site certainly educated me after that horrible plumbing scare. I've tried to live by these rules since. Because maintenance is key to a happy septic system!
        >
        > Call me a fanatic if you wish,
        >
        > Stephen
        >
      • Chuck Neville
        I guess we are doing well. Our municipality empties all the septic tanks every other year and up to now we haven t had any problems but it would probably be
        Message 3 of 6 , Jan 26, 2012
          I guess we are doing well. Our municipality empties all the septic
          tanks every other year and up to now we haven't had any
          problems but it would probably be a good idea to be more careful in the
          future.

          Chuck


          On 1/26/12 12:43 PM, Stephen wrote:
          >
          > Chuck and John A.,
          >
          > Our most recent home is a 1960's ranch-burger style house that was
          > completed
          > gutted and remodeled prior to our purchasing it. The remodel included
          > all new
          > plumbing among many other updated amenities.
          >
          > We use to dump everything down the drain because the seller installed
          > a garbage disposal at the kitchen sink. After about 5 years a gurgle
          > could be heard coming from the bar sink in the kitchen when we ran
          > water down the drain at the main sink.
          >
          > Long story short, a 20 foot section of the 2-inch PVC, kitchen
          > drainpipe underneath the house was removed and we were horrified at
          > what we saw. The 2-inch pipe was filled with a solid sludge except for
          > an area about the size of a pencil at the bottom of the pipe that
          > provided the only drainage. The sludge consisted of coffee grinds,
          > food solids and detergent slime.
          >
          > I immediately called the plumber to snake lines and vacuum the septic
          > tank. Once the septic tank was opened, the plumber jabbed a shovel
          > into the tank and let go of the shovel--it stood straight up--embedded
          > in solids!
          >
          > All that is behind us now. Today, if it's not liquid, it does not go
          > down the drain with the exception of solid human waste. It's either to
          > the compost or out the door in the trashcan.
          >
          > If one wants to know what NOT to put down their drains that flow to a
          > septic tank and to better understand septic systems, please go to this
          > website offered by the University of Georgia College of Agricultural
          > and Environmental Services and the US Department of Agriculture and
          > read the 2 page PDF file:
          >
          > http://www.fcs.uga.edu/ext/pubs/hace/HACE-E-47.pdf
          >
          > This site certainly educated me after that horrible plumbing scare.
          > I've tried to live by these rules since. Because maintenance is key to
          > a happy septic system!
          >
          > Call me a fanatic if you wish,
          >
          > Stephen
          >
          >



          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Stephen
          Chuck, That s a great service. Here, a pump-out cost $295. Stephen
          Message 4 of 6 , Jan 27, 2012
            Chuck,

            That's a great service. Here, a pump-out cost $295.

            Stephen

            --- In vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com, Chuck Neville <chuckneville@...> wrote:
            >
            > I guess we are doing well. Our municipality empties all the septic
            > tanks every other year and up to now we haven't had any
            > problems but it would probably be a good idea to be more careful in the
            > future.
            >
            > Chuck
            >
            >
            > On 1/26/12 12:43 PM, Stephen wrote:
            > >
            > > Chuck and John A.,
            > >
            > > Our most recent home is a 1960's ranch-burger style house that was
            > > completed
            > > gutted and remodeled prior to our purchasing it. The remodel included
            > > all new
            > > plumbing among many other updated amenities.
            > >
            > > We use to dump everything down the drain because the seller installed
            > > a garbage disposal at the kitchen sink. After about 5 years a gurgle
            > > could be heard coming from the bar sink in the kitchen when we ran
            > > water down the drain at the main sink.
            > >
            > > Long story short, a 20 foot section of the 2-inch PVC, kitchen
            > > drainpipe underneath the house was removed and we were horrified at
            > > what we saw. The 2-inch pipe was filled with a solid sludge except for
            > > an area about the size of a pencil at the bottom of the pipe that
            > > provided the only drainage. The sludge consisted of coffee grinds,
            > > food solids and detergent slime.
            > >
            > > I immediately called the plumber to snake lines and vacuum the septic
            > > tank. Once the septic tank was opened, the plumber jabbed a shovel
            > > into the tank and let go of the shovel--it stood straight up--embedded
            > > in solids!
            > >
            > > All that is behind us now. Today, if it's not liquid, it does not go
            > > down the drain with the exception of solid human waste. It's either to
            > > the compost or out the door in the trashcan.
            > >
            > > If one wants to know what NOT to put down their drains that flow to a
            > > septic tank and to better understand septic systems, please go to this
            > > website offered by the University of Georgia College of Agricultural
            > > and Environmental Services and the US Department of Agriculture and
            > > read the 2 page PDF file:
            > >
            > > http://www.fcs.uga.edu/ext/pubs/hace/HACE-E-47.pdf
            > >
            > > This site certainly educated me after that horrible plumbing scare.
            > > I've tried to live by these rules since. Because maintenance is key to
            > > a happy septic system!
            > >
            > > Call me a fanatic if you wish,
            > >
            > > Stephen
            > >
            > >
            >
            >
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
          • Herm L. Harrison
            Never mistake a government provided service for a free service. You re still paying for it and likely paying far more than it would cost in the open market.
            Message 5 of 6 , Jan 27, 2012
              Never mistake a government provided service for a free service. You're
              still paying for it and likely paying far more than it would cost in the
              open market.

              Herm L. Harrison
              Foster Transformer Company
              3820 Colerain Avenue
              Cincinnati, OH 45223-2586
              (800)963-9799
              (513)681-2420, ext. 111
              (513)681-2424
              herm.harrison@...
              http://www.foster-transformer.com


              On 01/27/2012 9:53 AM, Stephen wrote:
              >
              > Chuck,
              >
              > That's a great service. Here, a pump-out cost $295.
              >
              > Stephen
              >
              > --- In vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com
              > <mailto:vacuumcoffeepotcollector%40yahoogroups.com>, Chuck Neville
              > <chuckneville@...> wrote:
              > >
              > > I guess we are doing well. Our municipality empties all the septic
              > > tanks every other year and up to now we haven't had any
              > > problems but it would probably be a good idea to be more careful in the
              > > future.
              > >
              > > Chuck
              > >
              > >
              > > On 1/26/12 12:43 PM, Stephen wrote:
              > > >
              > > > Chuck and John A.,
              > > >
              > > > Our most recent home is a 1960's ranch-burger style house that was
              > > > completed
              > > > gutted and remodeled prior to our purchasing it. The remodel included
              > > > all new
              > > > plumbing among many other updated amenities.
              > > >
              > > > We use to dump everything down the drain because the seller installed
              > > > a garbage disposal at the kitchen sink. After about 5 years a gurgle
              > > > could be heard coming from the bar sink in the kitchen when we ran
              > > > water down the drain at the main sink.
              > > >
              > > > Long story short, a 20 foot section of the 2-inch PVC, kitchen
              > > > drainpipe underneath the house was removed and we were horrified at
              > > > what we saw. The 2-inch pipe was filled with a solid sludge except
              > for
              > > > an area about the size of a pencil at the bottom of the pipe that
              > > > provided the only drainage. The sludge consisted of coffee grinds,
              > > > food solids and detergent slime.
              > > >
              > > > I immediately called the plumber to snake lines and vacuum the septic
              > > > tank. Once the septic tank was opened, the plumber jabbed a shovel
              > > > into the tank and let go of the shovel--it stood straight
              > up--embedded
              > > > in solids!
              > > >
              > > > All that is behind us now. Today, if it's not liquid, it does not go
              > > > down the drain with the exception of solid human waste. It's
              > either to
              > > > the compost or out the door in the trashcan.
              > > >
              > > > If one wants to know what NOT to put down their drains that flow to a
              > > > septic tank and to better understand septic systems, please go to
              > this
              > > > website offered by the University of Georgia College of Agricultural
              > > > and Environmental Services and the US Department of Agriculture and
              > > > read the 2 page PDF file:
              > > >
              > > > http://www.fcs.uga.edu/ext/pubs/hace/HACE-E-47.pdf
              > > >
              > > > This site certainly educated me after that horrible plumbing scare.
              > > > I've tried to live by these rules since. Because maintenance is
              > key to
              > > > a happy septic system!
              > > >
              > > > Call me a fanatic if you wish,
              > > >
              > > > Stephen
              > > >
              > > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              > >
              >
              >


              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Stephen
              Herm, Never insinuated it was free, friend :) I couldn t agree with you more! Stephen
              Message 6 of 6 , Jan 27, 2012
                Herm,

                Never insinuated it was free, friend :)

                I couldn't agree with you more!

                Stephen


                --- In vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com, "Herm L. Harrison" <herm.harrison@...> wrote:
                >
                > Never mistake a government provided service for a free service. You're
                > still paying for it and likely paying far more than it would cost in the
                > open market.
                >
                > Herm L. Harrison
                > Foster Transformer Company
                > 3820 Colerain Avenue
                > Cincinnati, OH 45223-2586
                > (800)963-9799
                > (513)681-2420, ext. 111
                > (513)681-2424
                > herm.harrison@...
                > http://www.foster-transformer.com
                >
                >
                > On 01/27/2012 9:53 AM, Stephen wrote:
                > >
                > > Chuck,
                > >
                > > That's a great service. Here, a pump-out cost $295.
                > >
                > > Stephen
                > >
                > > --- In vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com
                > > <mailto:vacuumcoffeepotcollector%40yahoogroups.com>, Chuck Neville
                > > <chuckneville@> wrote:
                > > >
                > > > I guess we are doing well. Our municipality empties all the septic
                > > > tanks every other year and up to now we haven't had any
                > > > problems but it would probably be a good idea to be more careful in the
                > > > future.
                > > >
                > > > Chuck
                > > >
                > > >
                > > > On 1/26/12 12:43 PM, Stephen wrote:
                > > > >
                > > > > Chuck and John A.,
                > > > >
                > > > > Our most recent home is a 1960's ranch-burger style house that was
                > > > > completed
                > > > > gutted and remodeled prior to our purchasing it. The remodel included
                > > > > all new
                > > > > plumbing among many other updated amenities.
                > > > >
                > > > > We use to dump everything down the drain because the seller installed
                > > > > a garbage disposal at the kitchen sink. After about 5 years a gurgle
                > > > > could be heard coming from the bar sink in the kitchen when we ran
                > > > > water down the drain at the main sink.
                > > > >
                > > > > Long story short, a 20 foot section of the 2-inch PVC, kitchen
                > > > > drainpipe underneath the house was removed and we were horrified at
                > > > > what we saw. The 2-inch pipe was filled with a solid sludge except
                > > for
                > > > > an area about the size of a pencil at the bottom of the pipe that
                > > > > provided the only drainage. The sludge consisted of coffee grinds,
                > > > > food solids and detergent slime.
                > > > >
                > > > > I immediately called the plumber to snake lines and vacuum the septic
                > > > > tank. Once the septic tank was opened, the plumber jabbed a shovel
                > > > > into the tank and let go of the shovel--it stood straight
                > > up--embedded
                > > > > in solids!
                > > > >
                > > > > All that is behind us now. Today, if it's not liquid, it does not go
                > > > > down the drain with the exception of solid human waste. It's
                > > either to
                > > > > the compost or out the door in the trashcan.
                > > > >
                > > > > If one wants to know what NOT to put down their drains that flow to a
                > > > > septic tank and to better understand septic systems, please go to
                > > this
                > > > > website offered by the University of Georgia College of Agricultural
                > > > > and Environmental Services and the US Department of Agriculture and
                > > > > read the 2 page PDF file:
                > > > >
                > > > > http://www.fcs.uga.edu/ext/pubs/hace/HACE-E-47.pdf
                > > > >
                > > > > This site certainly educated me after that horrible plumbing scare.
                > > > > I've tried to live by these rules since. Because maintenance is
                > > key to
                > > > > a happy septic system!
                > > > >
                > > > > Call me a fanatic if you wish,
                > > > >
                > > > > Stephen
                > > > >
                > > > >
                > > >
                > > >
                > > >
                > > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                > > >
                > >
                > >
                >
                >
                > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                >
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