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Re: [vacpot] coffee grinding

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  • Dave Leonard
    Thanks. I ve seen pictures of those. They d be like my C30 s metal mesh except for the cover to keep a cone from forming and causing filter plugging. I can use
    Message 1 of 20 , Dec 13, 2011
    • 0 Attachment
      Thanks. I've seen pictures of those. They'd be like my C30's metal mesh except for the cover to keep a cone from forming and causing filter plugging.
      I can use my C30 metal mesh just fine with my KA grinder. The only issue is a bit of fine sediment, which isn't too bad. The same grind will stall my glass rods every time.

      Dave

       
      The Hurdy-Gurdy Man,




      ________________________________
      From: Herm L. Harrison <herm.harrison@...>
      To: vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Tuesday, December 13, 2011 10:31 AM
      Subject: Re: [vacpot] coffee grinding


       
      The C50 has a coarse perforated metal cover over a very fine wire mesh.

      Herm L. Harrison
      Foster Transformer Company
      3820 Colerain Avenue
      Cincinnati, OH 45223-2586
      (800)963-9799
      (513)681-2420, ext. 111
      (513)681-2424
      herm.harrison@...
      http://www.foster-transformer.com

      On 12/13/2011 10:03 AM, Dave Leonard wrote:
      >
      > Herm ,
      >
      > Which filter does the C50 use? I only have experience with The C30's
      > wire mesh screen and cloth filters.
      >
      > Bunn makes nice stuff. Is the burr grinder you have the big pro model?
      >
      > Dave in Michigan
      >
      >
      >
      > ________________________________
      > From: Herm L. Harrison <herm.harrison@...
      > <mailto:herm.harrison%40foster-transformer.com>>
      > To: vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com
      > <mailto:vacuumcoffeepotcollector%40yahoogroups.com>
      > Sent: Monday, December 12, 2011 5:18 PM
      > Subject: Re: [vacpot] coffee grinding
      >
      >
      >
      > I apologize for jumping into the conversation uninvited, but I use a
      > Bunn Burr grinder and have it set to grind very fine. So fine, in fact,
      > I had to pour the water in two stages when using a Bunn drip machine
      > lest the water overflow the filter and run grinds into the pot. Using a
      > Sunbeam C50 with this grind and it works very well. Have used 8 O'Clock
      > in the past and am currently using a Guatemalan blend from Costco. I
      > haven't experimented with coarsening the grind as I'm satisfied with my
      > current results and the Sunbeam has no trouble pulling the water through
      > the grinds and filter despite the fine texture and oiliness of the beans.
      >
      > Herm L. Harrison
      > Foster Transformer Company
      > 3820 Colerain Avenue
      > Cincinnati, OH 45223-2586
      > (800)963-9799
      > (513)681-2420, ext. 111
      > (513)681-2424
      > herm.harrison@...
      > <mailto:herm.harrison%40foster-transformer.com>
      > http://www.foster-transformer.com
      >
      > On 12/12/2011 5:02 PM, Dave Leonard wrote:
      > >
      > > Larry,
      > >
      > > Which grind setting do you use for vac brewing? Near perk or drip? I
      > > may try grinding some 8:00 bean or Sams coffee and see what happens.
      > >
      > > Dave
      > >
      > >
      > > The Hurdy-Gurdy Man,
      > >
      > > ________________________________
      > > From: Larry Hollenberg <larryhollenb@...
      > <mailto:larryhollenb%40yahoo.com>
      > > <mailto:larryhollenb%40yahoo.com>>
      > > To: "vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com
      > <mailto:vacuumcoffeepotcollector%40yahoogroups.com>
      > > <mailto:vacuumcoffeepotcollector%40yahoogroups.com>"
      > > <vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com
      > <mailto:vacuumcoffeepotcollector%40yahoogroups.com>
      > > <mailto:vacuumcoffeepotcollector%40yahoogroups.com>>
      > > Sent: Monday, December 12, 2011 4:52 PM
      > > Subject: Re: [vacpot] coffee grinding
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > Dave,
      > >
      > > I use the Eight O Clock Columbian bean and the last thing I have been
      > > enjoying is the Sams Choice I think it is of the Breakfast Blend.
      > > Since I too am using percolators a good deal of the time I grind it
      > > on the largest Drip Grind that on the grinder at the store is the one
      > > next to the Perk Grind. I put some in a mason jar with a thigh lid
      > > and freeze the rest and fill the jar as needed. I have been using both
      > > a silex with lox in rod with spring and the cory with glass rod and
      > > none of them has stalled once? I know what your saying though as
      > > over time I have had some very balky filters or coffee, more than
      > > likely the filters.
      > >
      > > Matt,
      > >
      > > I find that the Sunbeam Retro Coffee Master perks with the rather
      > > small basket do indeed flood with some grinds. I went though as you
      > > probably know a number of percolators this year in my quest to find
      > > which ones I liked the best, and as things go my idea changed somewhat
      > > to and from and back with some pots. At first I really found that
      > > if its working right, ( which is a very big if) the 50's Flavo Matic
      > > West Bends can do an very good job. Then after some of them started
      > > acting up I tried a few of those Sunbeams. They too could make decent
      > > coffee but quickly the thermostats went haywire an no amount of
      > > adjusting could make them work. Worse was that one of them had a fowl
      > > smell to the pot which was totally impossible to get rid of totally
      > > and quickly came back. Yuk. Then I found that if it worked a Dormeyer
      > > with the dowdy looking wide top worked better than any, but again
      > > after a short time the thermostat started to act up and way over cooked
      > > the coffee, or with the other it started shutting down when barely
      > > hot. So I returned to the West Bends and really I was right in the
      > > first place, with a somewhat coarse blend they made a very nice cup of
      > > coffee, rich and without that overly hot effect and somewhat brunt
      > > taste percolators can make. Some times I wish I had kept a few of the
      > > Alcohol Universal pots as they were the ultimate in control of perking
      > > and to this time nothing has worked better. That little alcohol burner
      > > would adjust to a great slow perk that made super coffee. ( you had
      > > to start out with hot water if you wanted it to perk quickly however).
      > >
      > > Larry
      > >
      > > ________________________________
      > > From: Dave Leonard <the_hurdy_gurdyman@...
      > <mailto:the_hurdy_gurdyman%40yahoo.com>
      > > <mailto:the_hurdy_gurdyman%40yahoo.com>>
      > > To: "vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com
      > <mailto:vacuumcoffeepotcollector%40yahoogroups.com>
      > > <mailto:vacuumcoffeepotcollector%40yahoogroups.com>"
      > > <vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com
      > <mailto:vacuumcoffeepotcollector%40yahoogroups.com>
      > > <mailto:vacuumcoffeepotcollector%40yahoogroups.com>>
      > > Sent: Monday, December 12, 2011 3:35 PM
      > > Subject: Re: [vacpot] coffee grinding
      > >
      > >
      > > I usually have 8:00 bean, both Colombian and regular decaf, around and
      > > use them from time to time. I put a small amount in a bag and the rest
      > > in the freezer. I'll use the bag to make my occasional afternoon pot.
      > > When the bag is almost empty, I get the frozen bag out and let sit
      > > until morning, the put more into the bag a freeze the rest again. The
      > > coffee is always good, but still plugs my glass rods.
      > >
      > > Dave
      > >
      > >
      > > The Hurdy-Gurdy Man,
      > >
      > > ________________________________
      > > From: Mark Hartman <kiltmark@... <mailto:kiltmark%40gmail.com>
      > <mailto:kiltmark%40gmail.com>>
      > > To: "vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com
      > <mailto:vacuumcoffeepotcollector%40yahoogroups.com>
      > > <mailto:vacuumcoffeepotcollector%40yahoogroups.com>"
      > > <vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com
      > <mailto:vacuumcoffeepotcollector%40yahoogroups.com>
      > > <mailto:vacuumcoffeepotcollector%40yahoogroups.com>>
      > > Sent: Monday, December 12, 2011 3:31 PM
      > > Subject: Re: [vacpot] coffee grinding
      > >
      > >
      > > Maybe my success comes from using 8 O'clock coffee. I grind it fresh,
      > > but have no idea how fresh the beans actually are. I know, it is
      > > probably heresy to use such cheap coffee (though it did win the Cook's
      > > Illustrated test it was in), and I do occasionally get Peets or some
      > > other better beans, but I haven't been bitten by the roasting bug.
      > > Maybe (since it sounds like you roast your own, correct me if I
      > > misinterpreted that) there is something about the way a fresher bean
      > > grinds that is giving you the problems. Come to think about it the
      > > tast time I had my pot stall on me may have been with the Peets...
      > >
      > > Sent from my iPad
      > >
      > > On Dec 12, 2011, at 15:00, Dave Leonard
      > <the_hurdy_gurdyman@... <mailto:the_hurdy_gurdyman%40yahoo.com>
      > > <mailto:the_hurdy_gurdyman%40yahoo.com>> wrote:
      > >
      > > > Thanks for the nice write up. I have a slew of percolators going
      > > back to a 1910 patent. Every now and then I dig one down and use it.
      > > Some of the old ones that don't have an auto shut off do a good job
      > > making coffee if I get them unplugged at just the right time. I have a
      > > glass stove-top perc that makes very good smooth coffee, a pleasant
      > > switch from vac brewers. I also have my mom's GE percolator, probably
      > > from the 50's. I grew up with this making coffee, and learned to love
      > > coffee through it. Still makes a nice pot of coffee. I have a fairly
      > > new Proctor Silex (70's, maybe?) with a glass pot that is nice, and
      > > makes a good cup (it's a 12 cup, good for card night :)
      > > >
      > > > However, I haven't found a percolator that can make the highlights
      > > of some coffees jump out like vac brewing does. I can use a cloth or
      > > fine mesh filter and get a very good cup. It's my main coffee each day
      > > unless I'm in a hurry. I have a Bunn-O-Matic fired up and ready for
      > > when I need coffee fast.
      > > > It just irks me to read of others using the glass rods with ease
      > > (and the ease of cleaning) and I can't. I've had three hand grinders
      > > and my KitchenAid grinder, and none of them seem to be compatible. I
      > > don't use oily beans often. I normally roast around City- Full City,
      > > rarely past that. I've been trying to get that Cory Rod to work since
      > > I first got a Cafex vac brewer back in the early 80's (I now have
      > > three different styles of rod), followed by a Sunbeam Coffeemaster C30
      > > and a glass Silex.. Once in a while it works, but not often. Back then
      > > it did better when I was buying commercial ground coffee most of the
      > > time. It only stalled occasionally. With my grinder today. it only
      > > actually works on rare occasions. I just get tired of wasting
      > > expensive coffee. I'm not wealthy, and this hobby cuts deep into my
      > > budget. It's funny, but the Cona, with it's finer grooves on its glass
      > > filter, works OK more often. About 50-50 or slightly better with it.
      > > Maybe it's
      > > > the alcohol burner instead of the gas stove.
      > > >
      > > > I also have a Silex Lox or whatever they are called. Had to do a lot
      > > of modification on the glass just to get it to fit, as the seams were
      > > terrible, letting grounds flow freely into the pot while the seams
      > > held the rod up from the funnel seat. It's better now, but still lets
      > > too much through.
      > > >
      > > > Anyway, I am compelled to dig those danged glass filters out about
      > > every six months and try again. There has to be a way to get them to
      > > work. After all, a lot of other people have no problems at all with
      > > them, and use a variety of grinders. I wish I could get a different
      > > grinder right now and try again, but living on SSI makes that a very
      > > major purchase, and just not in the cards for a bit. Maybe in a few
      > > months...
      > > >
      > > > On another note, I miss that old Cafex and Silex. I broke the top of
      > > the Cafex and the bottom of the Silex. Yes, they fit together.
      > > However, the funnel stem is far too short on the Silex, leaving around
      > > two inches or more water in the bottom, making a pretty weak cup.
      > > That's why I use a Yama. Only 12 dollars, which includes shipping, to
      > > replace either glass piece. Combine that with the best thought out
      > > seal I have yet seen, it's a no brainer.
      > > >
      > > > Dave
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > The Hurdy-Gurdy Man,
      > > >
      > > > ________________________________
      > > > From: "mathewdh@... <mailto:mathewdh%40q.com>
      > <mailto:mathewdh%40q.com>" <mathewdh@... <mailto:mathewdh%40q.com>
      > > <mailto:mathewdh%40q.com>>
      > > > To: vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com
      > <mailto:vacuumcoffeepotcollector%40yahoogroups.com>
      > > <mailto:vacuumcoffeepotcollector%40yahoogroups.com>
      > > > Sent: Monday, December 12, 2011 2:14 PM
      > > > Subject: [vacpot] coffee grinding
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > The issue that appears to me from the conversations is that the
      > > coffee is stalling when a Cory or Cona rod is used for the filtering.
      > > >
      > > > The textured portion of the rods is not all that deep for fluid
      > > passage. Smaller coffee grounds, aka Fines, and the residual powder
      > > can block these channels quickly. Experience has also shown me that
      > > the beans with the external oil sheen tend to clog the glass filters,
      > > and this includes the Silex model too. A clogged filter is bad. It is
      > > n ore than the inconvenience of having to get it to drain, the added
      > > time the grounds are floating in the fluid increases the extraction
      > > time that allows the bitter oils to come out. High quality home model
      > > grinders and commercial models are designed to eliminate incinsistant
      > > sized ground coffee and minimize the powder residue--but they cannot
      > > eliminate it. There is no guarentee that the grinder you are using on
      > > a mixer will do a great job of grinding for the grind consistancy you
      > > need for a vacuum coffee maker. If you look at the time these
      > > orginated in the 1930s, a lot of the coffee brewing was done in
      > > percolators and
      > > > the grind was not going to be the important feature for extacting
      > > brewed coffee. A percolator is not going to block up during the
      > > brewing cycle but the time length of extraction will vary the quality.
      > > >
      > > > For a little fun, try using a 1930's Universal percolator. They do a
      > > good job of extraction. You just have to check the coffee for the
      > > optimal brewing time so that later you can use a simple wind up timer
      > > for clocking the cycle. I have also gotten good results from a circa
      > > 1912 GE percoloator.
      > > >
      > > > Currently I am using a GE monel coiled wire filter with the cloth
      > > cover. It is similar to the Silex version but does not come with the
      > > little pulling handle at the hook end. Pull down is fast. Another type
      > > to look for would be the Abco Whirlpool filter. It is a coiled wire
      > > filter that sits in the siphon top area like a Cory rod. It does a
      > > very good job. It is not original though as the Kofee-Koil filter of
      > > 1939 was the first and it has a spring design to hold it in place.
      > > >
      > > > CHEERS...Mathew
      > > >
      > > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      > > >
      > > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      > > >
      > > >
      > >
      > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      > >
      > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      > >
      > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      > >
      > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      > >
      > >
      >
      > ----------
      >
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      > Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
      > Version: 9.0.925 / Virus Database: 271.1.1/4076 - Release Date:
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    • Larry Hollenberg
      Dave, I tired a pot of the coarser drip grind in the cory and it wasn t to successful.  For one the seal wanted to play games and I lost vacuum twice while it
      Message 2 of 20 , Dec 13, 2011
      • 0 Attachment
        Dave,

        I tired a pot of the coarser drip grind in the cory and it wasn't to successful.  For one the seal wanted to play games and I lost vacuum twice while it was starting to raise which didn't help.  I think the grind is too heavy for a vac pot. It makes wonderful perk coffee though. I think if your going to test best to try one of the "auto drip" settings to see what you get. Not sure if the coarser would be best to try or the center one?  Let us know if one of them works out well for you. 



        Larry




        ________________________________
        From: Dave Leonard <the_hurdy_gurdyman@...>
        To: "vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com" <vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Monday, December 12, 2011 4:02 PM
        Subject: Re: [vacpot] coffee grinding


         
        Larry,

        Which grind setting do you use for vac brewing? Near perk or drip? I may try grinding some 8:00 bean or Sams coffee and see what happens.

        Dave

         
        The Hurdy-Gurdy Man,

        ________________________________
        From: Larry Hollenberg <larryhollenb@...>
        To: "vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com" <vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Monday, December 12, 2011 4:52 PM
        Subject: Re: [vacpot] coffee grinding


         
        Dave,

        I use the Eight O Clock Columbian bean and the last thing I have been enjoying is the Sams Choice I think it is of the Breakfast Blend.  Since I too am using percolators a good deal of the time I grind it on the largest Drip Grind that on the grinder at the store is the one next to the Perk Grind.  I put some in a mason jar with a thigh lid and freeze the rest and fill the jar as needed. I have been using both a silex with lox in rod with spring and the cory with glass rod and none of them has stalled once?   I know what your saying though as over time I have had some very balky filters or coffee, more than likely the filters. 

        Matt,  

        I find that the Sunbeam Retro Coffee Master perks with the rather small basket do indeed flood with some grinds.  I went though as you probably know a number of percolators this year in my quest to find which ones I liked the best, and as things go my idea changed somewhat to and from and back with some pots.   At first I really  found that if its working right, ( which is a very big if) the 50's Flavo Matic West Bends can do an very good job.  Then after some of them started acting up I tried  a few of those Sunbeams. They too could make decent coffee but quickly the thermostats went haywire an no amount of adjusting could make them work. Worse was that one of them had a fowl smell to the pot which was totally impossible to get rid of totally and quickly came back. Yuk. Then I found that if it worked a Dormeyer with the dowdy looking wide top worked better than any, but again after a short time the thermostat started to act up and way over cooked
        the coffee, or with the other it started shutting down when barely hot.   So I returned to the West Bends and really I was right in the first place, with a somewhat coarse blend they made a very nice cup of coffee, rich and without that overly hot effect and somewhat brunt taste percolators can make. Some times I wish I had kept a few of the Alcohol Universal pots as they were the ultimate in control of perking and to this time nothing has worked better. That little alcohol burner would adjust to a great slow perk that made super coffee.  ( you had to start out with hot water if you wanted it to perk quickly however). 

        Larry

        ________________________________
        From: Dave Leonard <the_hurdy_gurdyman@...>
        To: "vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com" <vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Monday, December 12, 2011 3:35 PM
        Subject: Re: [vacpot] coffee grinding

         
        I usually have 8:00 bean, both Colombian and regular decaf, around and use them from time to time. I put a small amount in a bag and the rest in the freezer. I'll use the bag to make my occasional afternoon pot. When the bag is almost empty, I get the frozen bag out and let sit until morning, the put more into the bag a freeze the rest again. The coffee is always good, but still plugs my glass rods.

        Dave

         
        The Hurdy-Gurdy Man,

        ________________________________
        From: Mark Hartman <kiltmark@...>
        To: "vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com" <vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Monday, December 12, 2011 3:31 PM
        Subject: Re: [vacpot] coffee grinding

         
        Maybe my success comes from using 8 O'clock coffee. I grind it fresh, but have no idea how fresh the beans actually are. I know, it is probably heresy to use such cheap coffee (though it did win the Cook's Illustrated test it was in), and I do occasionally get Peets or some other better beans, but I haven't been bitten by the roasting bug. Maybe (since it sounds like you roast your own, correct me if I misinterpreted that) there is something about the way a fresher bean grinds that is giving you the problems. Come to think about it the tast time I had my pot stall on me may have been with the Peets...

        Sent from my iPad

        On Dec 12, 2011, at 15:00, Dave Leonard <the_hurdy_gurdyman@...> wrote:

        > Thanks for the nice write up. I have a slew of percolators going back to a 1910 patent. Every now and then I dig one down and use it. Some of the old ones that don't have an auto shut off do a good job making coffee if I get them unplugged at just the right time. I have a glass stove-top perc that makes very good smooth coffee, a pleasant switch from vac brewers. I also have my mom's GE percolator, probably from the 50's. I grew up with this making coffee, and learned to love coffee through it. Still makes a nice pot of coffee. I have a fairly new Proctor Silex (70's, maybe?) with a glass pot that is nice, and makes a good cup (it's a 12 cup, good for card night :)
        >
        > However, I haven't found a percolator that can make the highlights of some coffees jump out like vac brewing does. I can use a cloth or fine mesh filter and get a very good cup. It's my main coffee each day unless I'm in a hurry. I have a Bunn-O-Matic fired up and ready for when I need coffee fast.
        > It just irks me to read of others using the glass rods with ease (and the ease of cleaning) and I can't. I've had three hand grinders and my KitchenAid grinder, and none of them seem to be compatible. I don't use oily beans often. I normally roast around City- Full City, rarely past that. I've been trying to get that Cory Rod to work since I first got a Cafex vac brewer back in the early 80's (I now have three different styles of rod), followed by a Sunbeam Coffeemaster C30 and a glass Silex.. Once in a while it works, but not often. Back then it did better when I was buying commercial ground coffee most of the time. It only stalled occasionally. With my grinder today. it only actually works on rare occasions. I just get tired of wasting expensive coffee. I'm not wealthy, and this hobby cuts deep into my budget. It's funny, but the Cona, with it's finer grooves on its glass filter, works OK more often. About 50-50 or slightly better with it. Maybe it's
        > the alcohol burner instead of the gas stove.
        >
        > I also have a Silex Lox or whatever they are called. Had to do a lot of modification on the glass just to get it to fit, as the seams were terrible, letting grounds flow freely into the pot while the seams held the rod up from the funnel seat. It's better now, but still lets too much through.
        >
        > Anyway, I am compelled to dig those danged glass filters out about every six months and try again. There has to be a way to get them to work. After all, a lot of other people have no problems at all with them, and use a variety of grinders. I wish I could get a different grinder right now and try again, but living on SSI makes that a very major purchase, and just not in the cards for a bit. Maybe in a few months...
        >
        > On another note, I miss that old Cafex and Silex. I broke the top of the Cafex and the bottom of the Silex. Yes, they fit together. However, the funnel stem is far too short on the Silex, leaving around two inches or more water in the bottom, making a pretty weak cup. That's why I use a Yama. Only 12 dollars, which includes shipping, to replace either glass piece. Combine that with the best thought out seal I have yet seen, it's a no brainer.
        >
        > Dave
        >
        >
        > The Hurdy-Gurdy Man,
        >
        > ________________________________
        > From: "mathewdh@..." <mathewdh@...>
        > To: vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com
        > Sent: Monday, December 12, 2011 2:14 PM
        > Subject: [vacpot] coffee grinding
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > The issue that appears to me from the conversations is that the coffee is stalling when a Cory or Cona rod is used for the filtering.
        >
        > The textured portion of the rods is not all that deep for fluid passage. Smaller coffee grounds, aka Fines, and the residual powder can block these channels quickly. Experience has also shown me that the beans with the external oil sheen tend to clog the glass filters, and this includes the Silex model too. A clogged filter is bad. It is n ore than the inconvenience of having to get it to drain, the added time the grounds are floating in the fluid increases the extraction time that allows the bitter oils to come out. High quality home model grinders and commercial models are designed to eliminate incinsistant sized ground coffee and minimize the powder residue--but they cannot eliminate it. There is no guarentee that the grinder you are using on a mixer will do a great job of grinding for the grind consistancy you need for a vacuum coffee maker. If you look at the time these orginated in the 1930s, a lot of the coffee brewing was done in percolators and
        > the grind was not going to be the important feature for extacting brewed coffee. A percolator is not going to block up during the brewing cycle but the time length of extraction will vary the quality.
        >
        > For a little fun, try using a 1930's Universal percolator. They do a good job of extraction. You just have to check the coffee for the optimal brewing time so that later you can use a simple wind up timer for clocking the cycle. I have also gotten good results from a circa 1912 GE percoloator.
        >
        > Currently I am using a GE monel coiled wire filter with the cloth cover. It is similar to the Silex version but does not come with the little pulling handle at the hook end. Pull down is fast. Another type to look for would be the Abco Whirlpool filter. It is a coiled wire filter that sits in the siphon top area like a Cory rod. It does a very good job. It is not original though as the Kofee-Koil filter of 1939 was the first and it has a spring design to hold it in place.
        >
        > CHEERS...Mathew
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
        >

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Cheryl
        Hi everyone, I have a vtg. cory coffee grinder it is set just above the very fine grind. Which would be closer to an espresso grind than the drip grind.This
        Message 3 of 20 , Dec 13, 2011
        • 0 Attachment
          Hi everyone, I have a vtg. cory coffee grinder it is set just above the very fine grind. Which would be closer to an espresso grind than the drip grind.This works perfectly for me on my rubber and rubberless cory pots. I do not have a problem with a clogged filter or stalling. It will leave a little bit of a fine sediment and I do mean very little in the finished product. My spent grounds are almost completely dry when the coffee is done. I hope this helps. Cheryl :)
        • Dave Leonard
          Larry, I can t imagine any grind braking the seal on a Yama. This has the best seal I have ever seen on a vac pot. Dave   The Hurdy-Gurdy Man,
          Message 4 of 20 , Dec 13, 2011
          • 0 Attachment
            Larry, I can't imagine any grind braking the seal on a Yama. This has the best seal I have ever seen on a vac pot.

            Dave

             
            The Hurdy-Gurdy Man,




            ________________________________
            From: Larry Hollenberg <larryhollenb@...>
            To: "vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com" <vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com>
            Sent: Tuesday, December 13, 2011 5:31 PM
            Subject: Re: [vacpot] coffee grinding


             
            Dave,

            I tired a pot of the coarser drip grind in the cory and it wasn't to successful.  For one the seal wanted to play games and I lost vacuum twice while it was starting to raise which didn't help.  I think the grind is too heavy for a vac pot. It makes wonderful perk coffee though. I think if your going to test best to try one of the "auto drip" settings to see what you get. Not sure if the coarser would be best to try or the center one?  Let us know if one of them works out well for you. 

            Larry

            ________________________________
            From: Dave Leonard <the_hurdy_gurdyman@...>
            To: "vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com" <vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com>
            Sent: Monday, December 12, 2011 4:02 PM
            Subject: Re: [vacpot] coffee grinding


             
            Larry,

            Which grind setting do you use for vac brewing? Near perk or drip? I may try grinding some 8:00 bean or Sams coffee and see what happens.

            Dave

             
            The Hurdy-Gurdy Man,

            ________________________________
            From: Larry Hollenberg <larryhollenb@...>
            To: "vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com" <vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com>
            Sent: Monday, December 12, 2011 4:52 PM
            Subject: Re: [vacpot] coffee grinding

             
            Dave,

            I use the Eight O Clock Columbian bean and the last thing I have been enjoying is the Sams Choice I think it is of the Breakfast Blend.  Since I too am using percolators a good deal of the time I grind it on the largest Drip Grind that on the grinder at the store is the one next to the Perk Grind.  I put some in a mason jar with a thigh lid and freeze the rest and fill the jar as needed. I have been using both a silex with lox in rod with spring and the cory with glass rod and none of them has stalled once?   I know what your saying though as over time I have had some very balky filters or coffee, more than likely the filters. 

            Matt,  

            I find that the Sunbeam Retro Coffee Master perks with the rather small basket do indeed flood with some grinds.  I went though as you probably know a number of percolators this year in my quest to find which ones I liked the best, and as things go my idea changed somewhat to and from and back with some pots.   At first I really  found that if its working right, ( which is a very big if) the 50's Flavo Matic West Bends can do an very good job.  Then after some of them started acting up I tried  a few of those Sunbeams. They too could make decent coffee but quickly the thermostats went haywire an no amount of adjusting could make them work. Worse was that one of them had a fowl smell to the pot which was totally impossible to get rid of totally and quickly came back. Yuk. Then I found that if it worked a Dormeyer with the dowdy looking wide top worked better than any, but again after a short time the thermostat started to act up and way over cooked
            the coffee, or with the other it started shutting down when barely hot.   So I returned to the West Bends and really I was right in the first place, with a somewhat coarse blend they made a very nice cup of coffee, rich and without that overly hot effect and somewhat brunt taste percolators can make. Some times I wish I had kept a few of the Alcohol Universal pots as they were the ultimate in control of perking and to this time nothing has worked better. That little alcohol burner would adjust to a great slow perk that made super coffee.  ( you had to start out with hot water if you wanted it to perk quickly however). 

            Larry

            ________________________________
            From: Dave Leonard <the_hurdy_gurdyman@...>
            To: "vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com" <vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com>
            Sent: Monday, December 12, 2011 3:35 PM
            Subject: Re: [vacpot] coffee grinding

             
            I usually have 8:00 bean, both Colombian and regular decaf, around and use them from time to time. I put a small amount in a bag and the rest in the freezer. I'll use the bag to make my occasional afternoon pot. When the bag is almost empty, I get the frozen bag out and let sit until morning, the put more into the bag a freeze the rest again. The coffee is always good, but still plugs my glass rods.

            Dave

             
            The Hurdy-Gurdy Man,

            ________________________________
            From: Mark Hartman <kiltmark@...>
            To: "vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com" <vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com>
            Sent: Monday, December 12, 2011 3:31 PM
            Subject: Re: [vacpot] coffee grinding

             
            Maybe my success comes from using 8 O'clock coffee. I grind it fresh, but have no idea how fresh the beans actually are. I know, it is probably heresy to use such cheap coffee (though it did win the Cook's Illustrated test it was in), and I do occasionally get Peets or some other better beans, but I haven't been bitten by the roasting bug. Maybe (since it sounds like you roast your own, correct me if I misinterpreted that) there is something about the way a fresher bean grinds that is giving you the problems. Come to think about it the tast time I had my pot stall on me may have been with the Peets...

            Sent from my iPad

            On Dec 12, 2011, at 15:00, Dave Leonard <the_hurdy_gurdyman@...> wrote:

            > Thanks for the nice write up. I have a slew of percolators going back to a 1910 patent. Every now and then I dig one down and use it. Some of the old ones that don't have an auto shut off do a good job making coffee if I get them unplugged at just the right time. I have a glass stove-top perc that makes very good smooth coffee, a pleasant switch from vac brewers. I also have my mom's GE percolator, probably from the 50's. I grew up with this making coffee, and learned to love coffee through it. Still makes a nice pot of coffee. I have a fairly new Proctor Silex (70's, maybe?) with a glass pot that is nice, and makes a good cup (it's a 12 cup, good for card night :)
            >
            > However, I haven't found a percolator that can make the highlights of some coffees jump out like vac brewing does. I can use a cloth or fine mesh filter and get a very good cup. It's my main coffee each day unless I'm in a hurry. I have a Bunn-O-Matic fired up and ready for when I need coffee fast.
            > It just irks me to read of others using the glass rods with ease (and the ease of cleaning) and I can't. I've had three hand grinders and my KitchenAid grinder, and none of them seem to be compatible. I don't use oily beans often. I normally roast around City- Full City, rarely past that. I've been trying to get that Cory Rod to work since I first got a Cafex vac brewer back in the early 80's (I now have three different styles of rod), followed by a Sunbeam Coffeemaster C30 and a glass Silex.. Once in a while it works, but not often. Back then it did better when I was buying commercial ground coffee most of the time. It only stalled occasionally. With my grinder today. it only actually works on rare occasions. I just get tired of wasting expensive coffee. I'm not wealthy, and this hobby cuts deep into my budget. It's funny, but the Cona, with it's finer grooves on its glass filter, works OK more often. About 50-50 or slightly better with it. Maybe it's
            > the alcohol burner instead of the gas stove.
            >
            > I also have a Silex Lox or whatever they are called. Had to do a lot of modification on the glass just to get it to fit, as the seams were terrible, letting grounds flow freely into the pot while the seams held the rod up from the funnel seat. It's better now, but still lets too much through.
            >
            > Anyway, I am compelled to dig those danged glass filters out about every six months and try again. There has to be a way to get them to work. After all, a lot of other people have no problems at all with them, and use a variety of grinders. I wish I could get a different grinder right now and try again, but living on SSI makes that a very major purchase, and just not in the cards for a bit. Maybe in a few months...
            >
            > On another note, I miss that old Cafex and Silex. I broke the top of the Cafex and the bottom of the Silex. Yes, they fit together. However, the funnel stem is far too short on the Silex, leaving around two inches or more water in the bottom, making a pretty weak cup. That's why I use a Yama. Only 12 dollars, which includes shipping, to replace either glass piece. Combine that with the best thought out seal I have yet seen, it's a no brainer.
            >
            > Dave
            >
            >
            > The Hurdy-Gurdy Man,
            >
            > ________________________________
            > From: "mathewdh@..." <mathewdh@...>
            > To: vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com
            > Sent: Monday, December 12, 2011 2:14 PM
            > Subject: [vacpot] coffee grinding
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > The issue that appears to me from the conversations is that the coffee is stalling when a Cory or Cona rod is used for the filtering.
            >
            > The textured portion of the rods is not all that deep for fluid passage. Smaller coffee grounds, aka Fines, and the residual powder can block these channels quickly. Experience has also shown me that the beans with the external oil sheen tend to clog the glass filters, and this includes the Silex model too. A clogged filter is bad. It is n ore than the inconvenience of having to get it to drain, the added time the grounds are floating in the fluid increases the extraction time that allows the bitter oils to come out. High quality home model grinders and commercial models are designed to eliminate incinsistant sized ground coffee and minimize the powder residue--but they cannot eliminate it. There is no guarentee that the grinder you are using on a mixer will do a great job of grinding for the grind consistancy you need for a vacuum coffee maker. If you look at the time these orginated in the 1930s, a lot of the coffee brewing was done in percolators and
            > the grind was not going to be the important feature for extacting brewed coffee. A percolator is not going to block up during the brewing cycle but the time length of extraction will vary the quality.
            >
            > For a little fun, try using a 1930's Universal percolator. They do a good job of extraction. You just have to check the coffee for the optimal brewing time so that later you can use a simple wind up timer for clocking the cycle. I have also gotten good results from a circa 1912 GE percoloator.
            >
            > Currently I am using a GE monel coiled wire filter with the cloth cover. It is similar to the Silex version but does not come with the little pulling handle at the hook end. Pull down is fast. Another type to look for would be the Abco Whirlpool filter. It is a coiled wire filter that sits in the siphon top area like a Cory rod. It does a very good job. It is not original though as the Kofee-Koil filter of 1939 was the first and it has a spring design to hold it in place.
            >
            > CHEERS...Mathew
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
            >

            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Larry Hollenberg
            Dave, I  think I mentioned somewhere that it was a Cory Pot with glass rod.. I also had a cory with the metal filter which worked well also.  Larry
            Message 5 of 20 , Dec 13, 2011
            • 0 Attachment
              Dave,

              I  think I mentioned somewhere that it was a Cory Pot with glass rod.. I also had a cory with the metal filter which worked well also. 

              Larry


              ________________________________
              From: Dave Leonard <the_hurdy_gurdyman@...>
              To: "vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com" <vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com>
              Sent: Tuesday, December 13, 2011 8:36 PM
              Subject: Re: [vacpot] coffee grinding


               
              Larry, I can't imagine any grind braking the seal on a Yama. This has the best seal I have ever seen on a vac pot.

              Dave

               
              The Hurdy-Gurdy Man,

              ________________________________
              From: Larry Hollenberg <larryhollenb@...>
              To: "vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com" <vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com>
              Sent: Tuesday, December 13, 2011 5:31 PM
              Subject: Re: [vacpot] coffee grinding


               
              Dave,

              I tired a pot of the coarser drip grind in the cory and it wasn't to successful.  For one the seal wanted to play games and I lost vacuum twice while it was starting to raise which didn't help.  I think the grind is too heavy for a vac pot. It makes wonderful perk coffee though. I think if your going to test best to try one of the "auto drip" settings to see what you get. Not sure if the coarser would be best to try or the center one?  Let us know if one of them works out well for you. 

              Larry

              ________________________________
              From: Dave Leonard <the_hurdy_gurdyman@...>
              To: "vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com" <vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com>
              Sent: Monday, December 12, 2011 4:02 PM
              Subject: Re: [vacpot] coffee grinding

               
              Larry,

              Which grind setting do you use for vac brewing? Near perk or drip? I may try grinding some 8:00 bean or Sams coffee and see what happens.

              Dave

               
              The Hurdy-Gurdy Man,

              ________________________________
              From: Larry Hollenberg <larryhollenb@...>
              To: "vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com" <vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com>
              Sent: Monday, December 12, 2011 4:52 PM
              Subject: Re: [vacpot] coffee grinding

               
              Dave,

              I use the Eight O Clock Columbian bean and the last thing I have been enjoying is the Sams Choice I think it is of the Breakfast Blend.  Since I too am using percolators a good deal of the time I grind it on the largest Drip Grind that on the grinder at the store is the one next to the Perk Grind.  I put some in a mason jar with a thigh lid and freeze the rest and fill the jar as needed. I have been using both a silex with lox in rod with spring and the cory with glass rod and none of them has stalled once?   I know what your saying though as over time I have had some very balky filters or coffee, more than likely the filters. 

              Matt,  

              I find that the Sunbeam Retro Coffee Master perks with the rather small basket do indeed flood with some grinds.  I went though as you probably know a number of percolators this year in my quest to find which ones I liked the best, and as things go my idea changed somewhat to and from and back with some pots.   At first I really  found that if its working right, ( which is a very big if) the 50's Flavo Matic West Bends can do an very good job.  Then after some of them started acting up I tried  a few of those Sunbeams. They too could make decent coffee but quickly the thermostats went haywire an no amount of adjusting could make them work. Worse was that one of them had a fowl smell to the pot which was totally impossible to get rid of totally and quickly came back. Yuk. Then I found that if it worked a Dormeyer with the dowdy looking wide top worked better than any, but again after a short time the thermostat started to act up and way over cooked
              the coffee, or with the other it started shutting down when barely hot.   So I returned to the West Bends and really I was right in the first place, with a somewhat coarse blend they made a very nice cup of coffee, rich and without that overly hot effect and somewhat brunt taste percolators can make. Some times I wish I had kept a few of the Alcohol Universal pots as they were the ultimate in control of perking and to this time nothing has worked better. That little alcohol burner would adjust to a great slow perk that made super coffee.  ( you had to start out with hot water if you wanted it to perk quickly however). 

              Larry

              ________________________________
              From: Dave Leonard <the_hurdy_gurdyman@...>
              To: "vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com" <vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com>
              Sent: Monday, December 12, 2011 3:35 PM
              Subject: Re: [vacpot] coffee grinding

               
              I usually have 8:00 bean, both Colombian and regular decaf, around and use them from time to time. I put a small amount in a bag and the rest in the freezer. I'll use the bag to make my occasional afternoon pot. When the bag is almost empty, I get the frozen bag out and let sit until morning, the put more into the bag a freeze the rest again. The coffee is always good, but still plugs my glass rods.

              Dave

               
              The Hurdy-Gurdy Man,

              ________________________________
              From: Mark Hartman <kiltmark@...>
              To: "vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com" <vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com>
              Sent: Monday, December 12, 2011 3:31 PM
              Subject: Re: [vacpot] coffee grinding

               
              Maybe my success comes from using 8 O'clock coffee. I grind it fresh, but have no idea how fresh the beans actually are. I know, it is probably heresy to use such cheap coffee (though it did win the Cook's Illustrated test it was in), and I do occasionally get Peets or some other better beans, but I haven't been bitten by the roasting bug. Maybe (since it sounds like you roast your own, correct me if I misinterpreted that) there is something about the way a fresher bean grinds that is giving you the problems. Come to think about it the tast time I had my pot stall on me may have been with the Peets...

              Sent from my iPad

              On Dec 12, 2011, at 15:00, Dave Leonard <the_hurdy_gurdyman@...> wrote:

              > Thanks for the nice write up. I have a slew of percolators going back to a 1910 patent. Every now and then I dig one down and use it. Some of the old ones that don't have an auto shut off do a good job making coffee if I get them unplugged at just the right time. I have a glass stove-top perc that makes very good smooth coffee, a pleasant switch from vac brewers. I also have my mom's GE percolator, probably from the 50's. I grew up with this making coffee, and learned to love coffee through it. Still makes a nice pot of coffee. I have a fairly new Proctor Silex (70's, maybe?) with a glass pot that is nice, and makes a good cup (it's a 12 cup, good for card night :)
              >
              > However, I haven't found a percolator that can make the highlights of some coffees jump out like vac brewing does. I can use a cloth or fine mesh filter and get a very good cup. It's my main coffee each day unless I'm in a hurry. I have a Bunn-O-Matic fired up and ready for when I need coffee fast.
              > It just irks me to read of others using the glass rods with ease (and the ease of cleaning) and I can't. I've had three hand grinders and my KitchenAid grinder, and none of them seem to be compatible. I don't use oily beans often. I normally roast around City- Full City, rarely past that. I've been trying to get that Cory Rod to work since I first got a Cafex vac brewer back in the early 80's (I now have three different styles of rod), followed by a Sunbeam Coffeemaster C30 and a glass Silex.. Once in a while it works, but not often. Back then it did better when I was buying commercial ground coffee most of the time. It only stalled occasionally. With my grinder today. it only actually works on rare occasions. I just get tired of wasting expensive coffee. I'm not wealthy, and this hobby cuts deep into my budget. It's funny, but the Cona, with it's finer grooves on its glass filter, works OK more often. About 50-50 or slightly better with it. Maybe it's
              > the alcohol burner instead of the gas stove.
              >
              > I also have a Silex Lox or whatever they are called. Had to do a lot of modification on the glass just to get it to fit, as the seams were terrible, letting grounds flow freely into the pot while the seams held the rod up from the funnel seat. It's better now, but still lets too much through.
              >
              > Anyway, I am compelled to dig those danged glass filters out about every six months and try again. There has to be a way to get them to work. After all, a lot of other people have no problems at all with them, and use a variety of grinders. I wish I could get a different grinder right now and try again, but living on SSI makes that a very major purchase, and just not in the cards for a bit. Maybe in a few months...
              >
              > On another note, I miss that old Cafex and Silex. I broke the top of the Cafex and the bottom of the Silex. Yes, they fit together. However, the funnel stem is far too short on the Silex, leaving around two inches or more water in the bottom, making a pretty weak cup. That's why I use a Yama. Only 12 dollars, which includes shipping, to replace either glass piece. Combine that with the best thought out seal I have yet seen, it's a no brainer.
              >
              > Dave
              >
              >
              > The Hurdy-Gurdy Man,
              >
              > ________________________________
              > From: "mathewdh@..." <mathewdh@...>
              > To: vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com
              > Sent: Monday, December 12, 2011 2:14 PM
              > Subject: [vacpot] coffee grinding
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > The issue that appears to me from the conversations is that the coffee is stalling when a Cory or Cona rod is used for the filtering.
              >
              > The textured portion of the rods is not all that deep for fluid passage. Smaller coffee grounds, aka Fines, and the residual powder can block these channels quickly. Experience has also shown me that the beans with the external oil sheen tend to clog the glass filters, and this includes the Silex model too. A clogged filter is bad. It is n ore than the inconvenience of having to get it to drain, the added time the grounds are floating in the fluid increases the extraction time that allows the bitter oils to come out. High quality home model grinders and commercial models are designed to eliminate incinsistant sized ground coffee and minimize the powder residue--but they cannot eliminate it. There is no guarentee that the grinder you are using on a mixer will do a great job of grinding for the grind consistancy you need for a vacuum coffee maker. If you look at the time these orginated in the 1930s, a lot of the coffee brewing was done in percolators and
              > the grind was not going to be the important feature for extacting brewed coffee. A percolator is not going to block up during the brewing cycle but the time length of extraction will vary the quality.
              >
              > For a little fun, try using a 1930's Universal percolator. They do a good job of extraction. You just have to check the coffee for the optimal brewing time so that later you can use a simple wind up timer for clocking the cycle. I have also gotten good results from a circa 1912 GE percoloator.
              >
              > Currently I am using a GE monel coiled wire filter with the cloth cover. It is similar to the Silex version but does not come with the little pulling handle at the hook end. Pull down is fast. Another type to look for would be the Abco Whirlpool filter. It is a coiled wire filter that sits in the siphon top area like a Cory rod. It does a very good job. It is not original though as the Kofee-Koil filter of 1939 was the first and it has a spring design to hold it in place.
              >
              > CHEERS...Mathew
              >
              > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              >
              > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              >
              >

              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Phil Warner
              I’ve been reading the thread on coffee grinding and would first request that when answering this thread we delete all but a relevant bit of quoted material;
              Message 6 of 20 , Dec 14, 2011
              • 0 Attachment
                I’ve been reading the thread on coffee grinding and would first request that when answering this thread we delete all but a relevant bit of quoted material; it is really hard to find new posts among all the re-quoted stuff.

                On the thread itself we use a C30C daily and I grind beans in one of those square wooden hand coffee grinders that are usually seen as decorative items. The one I use has no label, is 5 inches square with a cast iron top, and sat on a shelf for years before we got into the vintage Sunbeam CoffeeMaster mode and I decided to see if it actually worked; it did and with a little adjusting of the top screw it makes a grind just right for the C30C’s Mesh filter. My wife prefers things with cords that plug into a wall socket and go whirr, so if she gets up first she pulverizes beans in a miniature whirling blade food processor thing which unfortunately makes enough small fines to bypass the mesh filter a bit, but hey, if she makes the coffee who am I to complain (at least not out loud).

                I also bought a smaller vintage Armin Trosser hand grinder at a flea market (like this one -http://www.cyberattic.com/stores/upnorthchevy69/items/868959/item868959cyberattic.html) that I thought might work even better, but the grinds are essentially the same as the no-name grinder and it has a much smaller drawer capacity so it now lives in the TransVan for making coffee on the road. It was interesting to me that each of these grinders took the same 80 turns to grind a half cup of Folgers Lively Columbian beans, the amount we use for a full pot, although the Armin Trosser drawer had to be emptied twice at that amount which is why it went to the van.

                Cheers, Phil Warner


                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • Larry Hollenberg
                Phil, While I think your idea on the thread is fine, I think you will find that in every case the reply is the first comment in it when you open the message.
                Message 7 of 20 , Dec 14, 2011
                • 0 Attachment
                  Phil,

                  While I think your idea on the thread is fine, I think you will find that in every case the reply is the first comment in it when you open the message. No need read any farther than that. 

                  Larry


                  ________________________________
                  From: Phil Warner <philwarner@...>
                  To: vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com
                  Sent: Wednesday, December 14, 2011 10:27 AM
                  Subject: [vacpot] Re: coffee grinding


                   
                  I’ve been reading the thread on coffee grinding and would first request that when answering this thread we delete all but a relevant bit of quoted material; it is really hard to find new posts among all the re-quoted stuff.




                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • Philip
                  It also helps to sort the messages by topic. Makes it very clear who said what to whom and when. Phil Petty
                  Message 8 of 20 , Dec 14, 2011
                  • 0 Attachment
                    It also helps to sort the messages by topic. Makes it very clear who said what to whom and when.

                    Phil Petty

                    --- In vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com, Larry Hollenberg <larryhollenb@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > Phil,
                    >
                    > While I think your idea on the thread is fine, I think you will find that in every case the reply is the first comment in it when you open the message. No need read any farther than that. 
                    >
                    > Larry
                    >
                    >
                    > ________________________________
                    > From: Phil Warner <philwarner@...>
                    > To: vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com
                    > Sent: Wednesday, December 14, 2011 10:27 AM
                    > Subject: [vacpot] Re: coffee grinding
                    >
                    >
                    >  
                    > I’ve been reading the thread on coffee grinding and would first request that when answering this thread we delete all but a relevant bit of quoted material; it is really hard to find new posts among all the re-quoted stuff.
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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                  • Larry Hollenberg
                    Phil,  I again agree. The  thing which is the closest to what your asking about is to go to the home page where you can see the existing topics and
                    Message 9 of 20 , Dec 14, 2011
                    • 0 Attachment
                      Phil,

                       I again agree. The  thing which is the closest to what your asking about is to go to the "home page" where you can see the existing topics and generally any answer pertaining to that topic will come up under the original message. Yes some of them are going to be about other things, but that is closest thing we have for practical use.  

                      It would be helpful if members would use the Start new Topic link at the bottom of all message pages for things that are significantly different than the current thread. Practically speaking that doesn't happen on many yahoo groups.  At least in ours most things will pertain to coffee or coffee pots, some groups might have a coffee discussion but end up taking about how the garden is growing  and never switch the topics. That is difficult to follow. 

                      Larry



                      ________________________________
                      From: Philip <pbpetty@...>
                      To: vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com
                      Sent: Wednesday, December 14, 2011 2:13 PM
                      Subject: [vacpot] Re: coffee grinding


                       


                      It also helps to sort the messages by topic. Makes it very clear who said what to whom and when.

                      Phil Petty

                      --- In vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com, Larry Hollenberg <larryhollenb@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > Phil,
                      >
                      > While I think your idea on the thread is fine, I think you will find that in every case the reply is the first comment in it when you open the message. No need read any farther than that. 
                      >
                      > Larry
                      >
                      >
                      > ________________________________
                      > From: Phil Warner <philwarner@...>
                      > To: vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com
                      > Sent: Wednesday, December 14, 2011 10:27 AM
                      > Subject: [vacpot] Re: coffee grinding
                      >
                      >
                      >  
                      > I’ve been reading the thread on coffee grinding and would first request that when answering this thread we delete all but a relevant bit of quoted material; it is really hard to find new posts among all the re-quoted stuff.
                      >
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