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My First Vacuum Coffee pot

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  • seanrussoct08
    Hi All, I am a new member to this site. I wanted to say hi and tell everyone that I just got my first vacuum coffee pot. I won an auction for a Silex Pyrex
    Message 1 of 4 , Feb 8, 2011
      Hi All,
      I am a new member to this site. I wanted to say hi and tell everyone that I just got my first vacuum coffee pot. I won an auction for a Silex Pyrex coffee pot, with a glass filter, black Bakelite handle and lid. It is the one with the silver bands around the top and bottom unit.

      I just received it yesterday after I got home from work. This morning I pulled out our old hot plate, because I was afraid to use our glass-top stove, and used it first thing this morning. The seal on this unit is very stiff, but it still made a good enough seal to brew a pot of coffee. Seemed to work good, although was very slow, maybe I'll use the big burner tomorrow. My next one I think will be a nice C50, if I can get one for a good price.

      How hot can you heat these glass pyrex brewers? Do I need to gradually turn up the heat, or can I just crank it on high?

      ~Sean
    • Larry Hollenberg
      Sean, Welcome to the group.  You will not want to put the silex glass on an electric hot plate without a little wire heat diffuser they sold for that purpose.
      Message 2 of 4 , Feb 8, 2011
        Sean,
        Welcome to the group.  You will not want to put the silex glass on an electric hot plate without a little wire heat diffuser they sold for that purpose. It holds the glass off the elements which can easily break your pot. Especially if you "crank it up". They were not meant for high heats, medium at the most.  Many of them suggested starting with hot water which can speed the time it comes to a brew in the top.   Silex did sell those little stoves to go under them but they were made with a raised set of ceramics that held the pot off the coils they used for heating.  I have used some pots successfully on early hot plates which used the same resistance coils instead of the soild heating element made starting around the late 30's.  I have also had pots to break on the silex stoves, so if you have a pot you really value I would always use the heat diffuser under it.  You can easily make your own if you haven't one by bending a wire coat hanger into a
        start shape and flatten it out to sit on the burner and support the pot. It only needs to be about four or five inches across.
        Larry
        --- On Tue, 2/8/11, seanrussoct08 <seanruss@...> wrote:

        From: seanrussoct08 <seanruss@...>
        Subject: [vacpot] My First Vacuum Coffee pot
        To: vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com
        Date: Tuesday, February 8, 2011, 1:39 PM
















         









        Hi All,

        I am a new member to this site. I wanted to say hi and tell everyone that I just got my first vacuum coffee pot. I won an auction for a Silex Pyrex coffee pot, with a glass filter, black Bakelite handle and lid. It is the one with the silver bands around the top and bottom unit.



        I just received it yesterday after I got home from work. This morning I pulled out our old hot plate, because I was afraid to use our glass-top stove, and used it first thing this morning. The seal on this unit is very stiff, but it still made a good enough seal to brew a pot of coffee. Seemed to work good, although was very slow, maybe I'll use the big burner tomorrow. My next one I think will be a nice C50, if I can get one for a good price.



        How hot can you heat these glass pyrex brewers? Do I need to gradually turn up the heat, or can I just crank it on high?



        ~Sean
































        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Dave Leonard
        hi Sean, I heat the water for my glass Cona vac pot in a separate heater until it s fairly hot. I then pour about 3/4 of an inch of hot water into the Cona and
        Message 3 of 4 , Feb 8, 2011
          hi Sean,

          I heat the water for my glass Cona vac pot in a separate heater until it's fairly hot. I then pour about 3/4 of an inch of hot water into the Cona and let it sit on low on my gas stove. When the water heating in the pot is almost at a boil, I remove the Cona from the stove and pour the rest of the water into it. Must make sure that there is no water drops at all on the outside of the glass or it can break when heat is added. I then return the pot to the stove and heat about 3/4 of full until the water rises, add coffee about half way up, then turn on low during the brew cycle, then remove from heat for draw-down.

          The glass pot will make a better brew than the Sunbeam unless the Sunbeam is tuned perfectly. Very few are, as age changes things. They can be readjusted, but this is tricky. The glass pots require more attention, but have much better control. I have both and rarely use the Sunbeam, even though it's settings are only off a little. I have one that the burner was bad on and stripped all the electronics off of. I use it as a stove-top brewer. The coffee made in it is almost identical to the Cona and gives me much better control of the brew than the electric.

          Vac brewing manually is an art that takes times to develop to perfection. Be patient and it pays off big time.

          Dave in Michigan

          The Hurdy-Gurdy Man,



          --- On Tue, 2/8/11, seanrussoct08 <seanruss@...> wrote:

          From: seanrussoct08 <seanruss@...>
          Subject: [vacpot] My First Vacuum Coffee pot
          To: vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com
          Date: Tuesday, February 8, 2011, 2:39 PM







           









          Hi All,

          I am a new member to this site. I wanted to say hi and tell everyone that I just got my first vacuum coffee pot. I won an auction for a Silex Pyrex coffee pot, with a glass filter, black Bakelite handle and lid. It is the one with the silver bands around the top and bottom unit.



          I just received it yesterday after I got home from work. This morning I pulled out our old hot plate, because I was afraid to use our glass-top stove, and used it first thing this morning. The seal on this unit is very stiff, but it still made a good enough seal to brew a pot of coffee. Seemed to work good, although was very slow, maybe I'll use the big burner tomorrow. My next one I think will be a nice C50, if I can get one for a good price.



          How hot can you heat these glass pyrex brewers? Do I need to gradually turn up the heat, or can I just crank it on high?



          ~Sean
























          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Tex
          Congrats on getting your first vac pot Sean! How about creating an album in the Photos section and posting some pics of your Silex? I use glass vac pots all
          Message 4 of 4 , Feb 8, 2011
            Congrats on getting your first vac pot Sean! How about creating an album in the Photos section and posting some pics of your Silex?

            I use glass vac pots all the time - sometimes a Yama or Yami tabletop, and sometimes a vintage Silex. I use a Cory glass filter rod with all of them; it seems to work better than the Silex glass rod with the spring.

            I don't heat the water in the lower bowl - I have an espresso machine that's on 24/7 and I use the hot water wand to fill the bowl with boiling water, then put it on the heat. Once it's at a rolling boil again (seconds) I put the top bowl in place. This gets me ready to brew in a couple of minutes. The same thing can be accomplished with an electric kettle (An external source of boiling water greatly simplifies using a vac pot.)

            Te

            --- In vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com, "seanrussoct08" <seanruss@...> wrote:
            >
            > Hi All,
            > I am a new member to this site. I wanted to say hi and tell everyone that I just got my first vacuum coffee pot. I won an auction for a Silex Pyrex coffee pot, with a glass filter, black Bakelite handle and lid. It is the one with the silver bands around the top and bottom unit.
            >
            > I just received it yesterday after I got home from work. This morning I pulled out our old hot plate, because I was afraid to use our glass-top stove, and used it first thing this morning. The seal on this unit is very stiff, but it still made a good enough seal to brew a pot of coffee. Seemed to work good, although was very slow, maybe I'll use the big burner tomorrow. My next one I think will be a nice C50, if I can get one for a good price.
            >
            > How hot can you heat these glass pyrex brewers? Do I need to gradually turn up the heat, or can I just crank it on high?
            >
            > ~Sean
            >
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