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Reasonably easy Aluminum polishing photo.

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  • larry h
    Hi All, In my testing of various coffee methods I am once again back to testing some Pedestal perks of which most are aluminum. I found this mid sized
    Message 1 of 2 , Sep 24, 2010
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      Hi All,

      In my testing of various coffee methods I am once again back to testing some "Pedestal" perks of which most are aluminum. I found this mid sized Universal Percolator and the finish was among the worst dull looking pots I have purchased. Over the years I have tried various things, many of which work after difficult cleaning. This pot was so dull and weathered looking that I decided it couldn't be much worse off to use fine steel wool on it. I started with 0000 grade dry. It quickly took it to a semi shine and even looking which was a big improvement. After that I knew it needed more gloss to look right. I decided to try a technique used in furniture finish polishing and used a new fine 0000 pad which I put some drops of baby oil on so it would not cut too fast. I polished rather briskly and it came out after several go rounds quite nicely. Still not 100% to my satisfaction. Then I got some polishing rouge for buffing wheels and used the white rouge for fine finishes. I put it dry on a smooth cotton cloth and repeated the rapid buffing by hand. After than and a good washing and buffing with a hand towel I think it looks pretty successful. It sounds like a lot of work. But in comparison to the cleaners I have used and the length of time, and then somewhat iffy results this technique is really a boom to me. I posted a photo of the finished pot.

      This percolator transmits the heat from the surface of the stove, in my case a wood range, just about as perfectly as you would want. Easy to control and no overcooked coffee effects. I used a fairly coarse grind although the grounds basket is marked to use a medium fine grind. When I tried that it clogged and held the water which caused it to be not as flavorful as when the water is able to pass though quickly. Takes more grounds than say a drip might, but it lays to rest the theory that percolators produce poor tasting coffee. I don't really think these style pots would be as successful on a electric or gas range due to the small foot. Some later style Mirro pots and others used this style into the 50's which was a surprise to me but they went to a wider foot which may have been more suited to stoves after solid fuel ranges went out of favor. This one is marked as 1907 on the last patent date.

      Larry
    • stebchem
      Wow, Larry. It seems that you ve got a good technique for bringing dull, scratched aluminum pots back to a nice shine. We ll have to try this on some of our
      Message 2 of 2 , Sep 25, 2010
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        Wow, Larry. It seems that you've got a good technique for bringing
        dull, scratched aluminum pots back to a nice shine.

        We'll have to try this on some of our desirable aluminum pots that
        just aren't as shiny as we'd like.

        Ron & Edgar
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