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Re: [vacpot] Re: Roasting beans

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  • Dave Leonard
    I am a member there, too. The only problem I have with them is that the coffee I want always comes up when I m broke, and when I have money, the wrong coffee
    Message 1 of 8 , Feb 6, 2010
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      I am a member there, too. The only problem I have with them is that the coffee I want always comes up when I'm broke, and when I have money, the wrong coffee becomes available. One of these days we'll coordinate and I'll get a deal.

      Dave



      --- On Sat, 2/6/10, John L. Bengfort <jbengfort@...> wrote:

      From: John L. Bengfort <jbengfort@...>
      Subject: Re: [vacpot] Re: Roasting beans
      To: vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com
      Date: Saturday, February 6, 2010, 1:03 PM







       









      I belong to the Green Coffee Buying Club (no fee) which has provided a huge amount of expertise and excellent coffee at inexpensive prices.  Dave Borton who has provided comment on these pages often distributes coffee at this site.  Highly recommended.



      --- On Sat, 2/6/10, seavandal91203 <seavandal@hotmail. com> wrote:



      From: seavandal91203 <seavandal@hotmail. com>

      Subject: [vacpot] Re: Roasting beans

      To: vacuumcoffeepotcoll ector@yahoogroup s.com

      Date: Saturday, February 6, 2010, 10:23 AM



       



      Excellent advice Dave. I tried some Ethiopian a month ago, and it looked marbled instead of green. For me, it turned out nasty! I guess there are a few varieties to choose from. I had a great bag of green Ethiopian from another roaster that was excellent. Lately, he has been stingy about giving it out (likes to blend it with other beans. I'll ask what variety both have and see if I can get the variety you mentioned. I'll look for the other beans that you mentioned (Sweet Maria's?) and give it a whirl. The Poppery 11 seems to be an interesting choice at best but I didn't like the fact that you can only roast a very small amount (like only enough for one pot) at a time. The Whirley Pop does enough for a few days in 10 minutes or a week's worth in 20. By the way, I just tried out my Beehive c30a with a courser grind and the fine mesh filter this morning. 20 seconds until it snapped to Low. It seemed to stall towards the end. I put the fan on it and

      voila, down it went. I think the cooling of the copper at the neck really does make the vacuum work better. Unfortunately, the coffee doesn't really taste good. A little burnt flavor. I have used a Kent glass vac pot but have trouble separating the two pots after brewing. It's scary putting so much pressure on the glass with my fingers. I fear that I will break the glass. Is there a lubricant (vegetable oil or something) that I can put on the seal for an easier separation? The Nicro is very consistent in it's flavor. I'm never at the mercy of an electric switch to determine when it's the right time to pull it off the fire. My Chemex is a great choice too but I have found that the coffee turns out very cold when the brew process is complete. I have tried hot water baths, filling the carafe with hot water, etc. but the coffee is no where near the temperature of the vacpots. I must admit that the Chemex does make some very tasty coffee.



      --- In vacuumcoffeepotcoll ector@yahoogroup s.com, Dave Leonard <the_hurdy_gurdyman @...> wrote:



      >



      > I use Ethiopian Yirgacheffe, too. Try roasting some Tanzanian Peaberry to around a New York City Roast and Ethiopian Yirgacheffe to a N.Y. City plus, or even a French Roast, and blend the two. Use Tanzanian 70%/Ethiopian 30%. This makes some of the best coffee I have ever had. Nothing you can buy off the shelf will come close. Also, if you like this type of coffee, try Kenya AA. It is also great with lots of fruity overtones that no off the shelf coffee has.



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      > For those of you who haven't tried home roasting, you don't know what you are missing. No matter how a coffee is packaged, they all lose the fresh roasted taste in a short time, even bricks of coffee. They don't taste stale, but that wonderful fresh brightness is missing. You can order beans fresh roasted from roasters and get them within a couple of days. These will still taste good, but you are limited to what the roaster feels is the best roast for a given bean. By doing it yourself, you can experiment with each type of bean and find the perfect roast for you. Nothing else is as good.



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      > The simplest and least complicated way at a decent price to roast for a beginner who doesn't have a large family of coffee drinkers to supply is to get a Fresh Roast plus 8. This roasts enough for one person to last several days. Takes less than 10 minutes to use. You can clearly see the color of the beans while roasting and hear the cracks. The chafe filter works great, so no mess. You do want to use next to an open door or window, as a darker roast will smoke and stink. It's all very easy and well worth while. Cost for the roaster is around $100. Bigger roasters cost more but would be needed for coffee drinking families. Some popcorn poppers work (like the Poppery II), but are difficult to see the beans and make more noise, so it's harder to hear the beans crack. A skillet can work well, also, but takes more practice and the beans need to be constantly flipped to keep them from burning on the flat side.



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      > A new roast is at it's best after gassing out for around 24 hours and stays fresh for a couple of weeks if stored propperly. Nothing else out there comes close to fresh roasted coffee. I'd encourage everyone to give it a try. It's not difficult and, with a little practice, you can get professional results.



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      > Dave in Michigan



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      > --- On Sat, 2/6/10, Larry Hollenberg <larryhollenb@ ...> wrote:



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      > From: Larry Hollenberg <larryhollenb@ ...>



      > Subject: Re: [vacpot] Roasting beans



      > To: vacuumcoffeepotcoll ector@yahoogroup s.com



      > Date: Saturday, February 6, 2010, 9:03 AM



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      > Just about anything is better than Starbucks to my taste.  Try some Eight O Clock Ground  Columbian, very inexpensive and quite good to my mind.  



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      > Larry



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      > --- On Sat, 2/6/10, seavandal91203 <seavandal@hotmail. com> wrote:



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      > From: seavandal91203 <seavandal@hotmail. com>



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      > Subject: [vacpot] Roasting beans



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      > To: vacuumcoffeepotcoll ector@yahoogroup s.com



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      > Date: Saturday, February 6, 2010, 12:10 AM



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      > I decided about a year ago that I wanted to home roast beans. I tried to get a corn air popper to work with no thermostat but wired it wrong. It literally blew up in my face! Next was the best home roaster that I found at a garage sale: The Whirley Pop. Several pounds later, I have figured out the time and amounts to roast. On the gas coleman stove outside, I can roast about a pint of green beans at a time. 10 minutes total and I have a full city roast. Sumatra seems to be the best for my taste. There is a local roaster that sells the beans to me for $4 to $5 a pound. Ethiopian is a really good bean too. They have Peruvian and Mexican bean that I think I'll try out as well. Does anyone home roast? It seems to be a pretty cheap way to get great fresh bean with a low dough mentality. Last time I went to Starbucks and bought a cup of Petes, I really felt that my brew was better. It has to be the Vac pot!



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